Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Technology

A special issue of Inorganics (ISSN 2304-6740). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3530

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Materials Modelling and Simulation Group, School of Engineering, STEM College, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Interests: carbon nanomaterials; materials science; computational chemistry; molecular dynamics

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Guest Editor
Discipline of Chemistry, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
Interests: carbon nanomaterials; materials science computational chemistry; specific ion effects

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of Inorganics titled Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Technology. Carbon nanomaterials have emerged over the past few decades as prime candidates for novel and next-generation applications in the technological materials space. Examples include graphene and carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics, carbon nanoparticles for drug delivery systems and nanodiamonds in bioimaging. Their remarkable mechanical, thermal and electronic properties have attracted broad scientific attention and can be tailored for functional applications across all dimensions.  

Significant steps in the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials have been realized in recent years, These range from rapid processes aimed at scaling up production to highly controlled conditions aimed at achieving selective growth. In unlocking the full potential of carbon nanomaterials to be realized, both experimental and theoretical techniques have been utilized. This has and will lead to the incorporation of carbon nanomaterials into advanced technologies.

This Special Issue aims to detail a collection of original research articles and reviews that reflect recent progress into understanding, synthesizing, and applying carbon nanomaterials. Contributions concerning all kinds of carbon nanomaterials are welcome, with the focus of the employed experimental and/or theoretical techniques being the implementation of carbon nanomaterials in emerging and advanced technology. These technologies could be (but are not limited to) nanoelectronics, sensing, bioimaging, biomedicine, catalysis, mechanical reinforcement and photocatalysis.

We are looking forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Ben McLean
Prof. Dr. Alister Page
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inorganics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon nanomaterial
  • advanced technology
  • graphene
  • carbon nanotube
  • nanodiamond
  • functional applications
  • materials science

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 3530 KiB  
Article
Repair of Small-Area Delamination in Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer through Small Drilled Hole and Carbon Nanotubes-Reinforced Resin Pre-Coating Technique
by Gang Han and Xiaozhi Hu
Inorganics 2023, 11(12), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics11120454 - 24 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1514
Abstract
This study explores the potential for repairing small, isolated delamination areas in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP), while preserving the integrity of the composite structures. A small drilled hole at the center of the delamination section served as a channel for the epoxy infill [...] Read more.
This study explores the potential for repairing small, isolated delamination areas in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP), while preserving the integrity of the composite structures. A small drilled hole at the center of the delamination section served as a channel for the epoxy infill of the sharp delamination cracks. The pressureless infill repair was achieved through the capillary action of an acetone-diluted resin pre-coating (RPC) solution (without hardener) with CNT reinforcement, comprising 89 m/m% acetone, 10 m/m% resin, and 1 m/m% CNT. This acetone-rich resin pre-coating (RPC) solution is easily prepared and applied to the drilled hole area. Curing of the CNT-toughened resin infill was induced by filling the small drilled hole with a resin–hardener mixture toughened by CNT/aramid pulp. The effectiveness of the delamination repair was compared for curing periods of two weeks and three months. The flexural strength measurements indicated that a restoration level of 77% was achieved in this study, while the optimum 100% restoration was achieved using the same technique for edge delamination repairs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Technology)
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Review

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14 pages, 4918 KiB  
Review
Dispersion Stability of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Impact on Energy Storage Devices
by Chunghyeon Choi, Tae Gwang Yun and Byungil Hwang
Inorganics 2023, 11(10), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics11100383 - 25 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1529
Abstract
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with their extraordinary combination of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties, have emerged as a revolutionary class of nanomaterials with immense potential in energy storage and harvesting devices. Realizing this potential hinges on a fundamental challenge: the dispersion stability of CNTs [...] Read more.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with their extraordinary combination of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties, have emerged as a revolutionary class of nanomaterials with immense potential in energy storage and harvesting devices. Realizing this potential hinges on a fundamental challenge: the dispersion stability of CNTs within various matrices. This review paper provides a comprehensive exploration of the critical interplay between CNT dispersion stability and its far-reaching implications for the performance of energy storage and harvesting technologies. By delving into the underlying mechanisms of dispersion, the strategies to achieve stability, and the direct effects on device functionality, this review sheds light on the intricate relationship between nanotube dispersion and the advancement of energy-related applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanomaterials for Advanced Technology)
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