Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing in Chronic Illness Using Art

A topical collection in Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This collection belongs to the section "Chronic Care".

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Editors


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Guest Editor
Medical Biology Centre, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: mindfulness; well-being; quality of life; complimentary therapies; Palliative care; nephrology; qualitative
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Guest Editor
1. School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
2. Mental Health and Addictions Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Seebohm Rowntree Building, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK
Interests: arts in health; chronic kidney disease; mental and physical health comorbidity; trial methodology; mixed methods; complex intervention development and evaluation

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

This collection of Healthcare will focus on the use of the arts to promote mental health and wellbeing among people with chronic illnesses. The use of the arts in healthcare is a growing area of research, with epidemiological evidence suggesting that engagement with the arts can have a sustained positive impact across one’s lifespan. Evaluations of arts-based interventions in a variety of settings have highlighted the beneficial impact the arts can have on mental health outcomes, including reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression, and increasing mental wellbeing. However, the new field of the arts in health research has typically focused on the use of the arts in general or in psychiatric populations, with little research exploring how the arts can address aspects of mental health impacted by living with a chronic physical illness.

This Special Issue seeks papers (both original research and reviews) related to the use of the arts (including visual arts, performing arts, literary arts, digital arts and cultural events) to promote mental health and wellbeing in people living with chronic physical illness.

Dr. Helen Noble
Dr. Claire Carswell
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • arts in health
  • arts-based interventions
  • chronic illness
  • mental health
  • comorbidity
  • mental wellbeing

Published Papers (7 papers)

2022

Jump to: 2021

11 pages, 568 KiB  
Article
Can Music Therapy Improve the Quality of Life of Institutionalized Elderly People?
by María José González-Ojea, Sara Domínguez-Lloria and Margarita Pino-Juste
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020310 - 06 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3998
Abstract
Introduction: The current population has new characteristics that require changes to be made in the public health system. In the case of the elderly, the concrete aspects of their health must be known to improve the system, in search of a better quality [...] Read more.
Introduction: The current population has new characteristics that require changes to be made in the public health system. In the case of the elderly, the concrete aspects of their health must be known to improve the system, in search of a better quality of life and as much independence as possible. Method: The aim of this study was to verify the efficiency of a music therapy program with institutionalized elderly participants to avoid depressive symptoms and improve social interaction and creativity. This is a group case study that uses a pretest–post-test descriptive design. The program was divided into sixteen sessions, two sessions each week. As inclusion and exclusion criteria, physical dependency and cognitive state were used. Results: The results present an improvement in the physical dimensions of quality of life and an increase in creativity and social interaction. It is recommended that the sessions in the program, aiming to achieve a greater efficiency, are extended because the elderly have very ingrained habits and routines that are very hard to eliminate. Discussion and conclusions: Music therapy, a non-pharmacological and worthwhile treatment, is a therapeutic option with proven benefits. Music therapy has the potential to improve health and quality of life in the elderly and also foster the amelioration of various chronic illnesses, such as depression. Full article
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13 pages, 244 KiB  
Project Report
Evaluation of a Programme of Online Arts Activities for Patients with Kidney Disease during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Anna Wilson, Claire Carswell, Stephanie Burton, William Johnston, Jennifer Baxley Lee, Alistair MacKenzie, Michael Matthews, Paul Murphy, Joanne Reid, Ian Walsh, Fina Wurm and Helen Noble
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020260 - 28 Jan 2022
Viewed by 2413
Abstract
Patients living with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have been seriously impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. As these patients are considered extremely clinically vulnerable, they were advised to ‘shield’ at home, with limited face-to-face contact and support for the duration of the pandemic. Living [...] Read more.
Patients living with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have been seriously impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. As these patients are considered extremely clinically vulnerable, they were advised to ‘shield’ at home, with limited face-to-face contact and support for the duration of the pandemic. Living with ESKD impacts heavily on patients’ mental health and wellbeing, and this extended period of isolation and loneliness is likely to have a further negative effect on patients’ mental wellbeing. The Renal Arts Group (RAG), Queen’s University Belfast, aims to improve the quality of life of those living with ESKD and the extended renal community through engagement with the arts. We developed an initiative, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, and carried out an evaluation. The initiative included a programme of online arts-based activities that built upon the work of RAG and provided mental wellbeing support for patients who faced an extended, lonely period of self-isolation. We worked with experienced arts practitioners to identify appropriate activities and developed five workshops and tutorials that were delivered online. We received positive feedback from participants who found the activities to be enjoyable, beneficial to their mental wellbeing and were interested in undertaking further activities online. We conducted interviews with the arts facilitators and identified three themes for consideration when developing online arts activities for the renal community. Participants reported that the activities benefited their mental wellbeing, were enjoyable and provided an opportunity to meet others with shared interests. The arts facilitators reported experiences around accessibility, audience engagement, impact on health and wellbeing and facilitator experience, that should be considered when developing online arts activities for the renal community. This evaluation will inform future work in this area, and the arts tutorial videos developed as part of this project will remain available online for members of the renal community to access. Full article

2021

Jump to: 2022

3 pages, 167 KiB  
Editorial
Developing Guidance on Implementing Volunteer-Led Intradialytic Arts Activities in Haemodialysis Units
by Anna Wilson, Claire Carswell and Helen Noble
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1506; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111506 - 05 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1423
Abstract
The Renal Arts Group (RAG) at Queen’s University Belfast was formed in 2016 as a collaboration between patients with kidney disease, carers, clinicians, academics and artists to develop a programme of research with the ultimate aim of improving the physical and psychological quality [...] Read more.
The Renal Arts Group (RAG) at Queen’s University Belfast was formed in 2016 as a collaboration between patients with kidney disease, carers, clinicians, academics and artists to develop a programme of research with the ultimate aim of improving the physical and psychological quality of life of those living with kidney disease through the medium of the arts [...] Full article
13 pages, 253 KiB  
Article
The Added Value of Art for the Well-Being of Older People with Chronic Psychiatric Illnesses and Dementia Living in Long-Term Care Facilities, and on the Collaboration between Their Caregivers and Artists
by Petra Boersma, Tjeerd van der Ploeg and Robbert J. J. Gobbens
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1489; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111489 - 01 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2188
Abstract
This study sought to provide insight into how art activities influence the well-being of long-term care residents, and how artists and caregivers collaborate in offering these activities. In two long-term care facilities for people with dementia and one for older people with chronic [...] Read more.
This study sought to provide insight into how art activities influence the well-being of long-term care residents, and how artists and caregivers collaborate in offering these activities. In two long-term care facilities for people with dementia and one for older people with chronic psychiatric disorders, an uncontrolled pre- and post-test study was conducted using a mixed-method design. Forty-six residents participated in the study. Three art activities—(a) dance, (b) music and movement, and (c) visual arts—were studied and co-created with the residents and executed by artists and caregivers together in eight to ten weeks. The Face expression scale (FACE) was used to examine the extent to which participating in the art activity influenced resident mood. Qualitative data were collected via group discussions with artists, caregivers, residents, and an informal caregiver. The results indicated that participating in an art activity positively influenced resident mood (p < 0.000). p-values for the three art activities were: p < 0.000 for dance, p = 0.048 for music and movement, and p = 0.023 for visual arts. The qualitative data revealed that joining an art activity provided a positive effect, increased social relationships, and improved self-esteem for residents. The collaboration between artists and caregivers stimulated creativity, beauty, and learning from each other, as well as evoking emotions. Full article
14 pages, 237 KiB  
Article
The Experiences of a Complex Arts-Based Intervention for Patients with End-Stage Kidney Disease Whilst Receiving Haemodialysis: A Qualitative Process Evaluation
by Claire Carswell, Joanne Reid, Ian Walsh, Clare McKeaveney and Helen Noble
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1392; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101392 - 18 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1769
Abstract
The global prevalence and burden of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is increasing, partially as a result of an aging population. Patients with ESKD who receive haemodialysis experience a difficult, protracted treatment regimen that can negatively impact mental health and wellbeing. One way of [...] Read more.
The global prevalence and burden of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is increasing, partially as a result of an aging population. Patients with ESKD who receive haemodialysis experience a difficult, protracted treatment regimen that can negatively impact mental health and wellbeing. One way of addressing this issue could be through the provision of arts-based interventions during haemodialysis treatment. A process evaluation was conducted as part of a larger feasibility study, to explore experiences and acceptability of an intra-dialytic (during haemodialysis) arts-based intervention. Thirteen patients and nine healthcare professionals were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Three themes related to the experience of art on dialysis included: the perception of art participation, as patients described initial anxiety around participating in art, which reduced after they experienced the intervention; the benefits of art participation on both patients and healthcare professionals; the benefits including improved self-esteem, motivation, increased social interaction and an overall improved haemodialysis experience; and the acceptability of the arts-based intervention, as the intervention was highly acceptable, even when delivered by a facilitator who was not a professional artist. This study highlights that arts-based interventions could be used to improve the mental health and wellbeing of patients with ESKD receiving haemodialysis. Full article
11 pages, 1012 KiB  
Article
Inside OCD: Perspectives on the Value of Storytelling with Individuals with OCD and Family Members
by Jeffrey Pufahl, Jaison Nainaparampil and Carol A. Mathews
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 920; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9080920 - 21 Jul 2021
Viewed by 2945
Abstract
The Center for Arts in Medicine at the University of Florida (UF) partnered with the UF Center for OCD, Anxiety, and Related Disorders to develop a storytelling program for individuals with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and their families. Over ten weeks, participants shared [...] Read more.
The Center for Arts in Medicine at the University of Florida (UF) partnered with the UF Center for OCD, Anxiety, and Related Disorders to develop a storytelling program for individuals with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and their families. Over ten weeks, participants shared stories regarding their experiences with OCD and engaged in theater and storytelling exercises. In collaboration with each other and the facilitators, participants workshopped and transformed their stories into a cohesive theatrical performance. Participants performed in front of a live audience and engaged in a post-show discussion with the audience, which focused on the diagnosis of OCD, stigma regarding the illness, and the benefits of the program. Program members participated in a post-program focus group and completed a qualitative and quantitative online survey. Participants reported improved understanding of their OCD, more acceptance from family and friends, less shame and guilt related to their OCD, and more confidence about sharing their OCD stories. Although the program was not designed to be therapeutic, participants also reported therapeutic value. Preliminary findings of this study suggest storytelling programs can lead to a reduction in both self-stigma and community stigma; improvement of understanding of the lived experience of OCD by families, loved ones, and clinicians; and facilitation of interpersonal connections. Full article
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12 pages, 375 KiB  
Review
Impact of Alzheimer’s Dementia on Caregivers and Quality Improvement through Art and Music Therapy
by Laura-Cristina Popa, Mihnea Costin Manea, Diana Velcea, Ion Șalapa, Mirela Manea and Adela Magdalena Ciobanu
Healthcare 2021, 9(6), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060698 - 09 Jun 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 9562
Abstract
Dementia is a general term for a series of medical conditions that affect the brain and evolve progressively. According to the literature, there are over 200 subtypes and causes of dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) being the most common in elderly people. AD [...] Read more.
Dementia is a general term for a series of medical conditions that affect the brain and evolve progressively. According to the literature, there are over 200 subtypes and causes of dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) being the most common in elderly people. AD is an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative condition that leads to a decline in mental function, enough to disrupt daily life. Thinking skills slowly deteriorate, which, in advanced stages, makes it impossible to perform simple tasks. Besides the change in the quality of life of AD patients and their families, there is a considerable alteration in the quality of life of their caregivers, whose health can be negatively affected by the development of mental and somatic disorders. This article reviews the literature in order to reveal the benefits of applying non-pharmacological interventions such as music and art therapy to improve quality of life. This article also aims to shed light on the impact of this disease on the caregiver’s life. Music and art therapy have produced reliable results in the treatment of patients with AD, and the best effects are related to increased socialization and the maintenance of social status. Full article
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