Professionalizing Genealogy and Genealogical Research

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2017) | Viewed by 10282

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Fellow, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland
2. Academician, Académie Internationale de Généalogie, 75000 Paris, France
Interests: Scottish genealogy; Scottish heraldry; palaeography; 17th and 18th century documents; genetic genealogy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Genealogy invites scholarly articles and essays on the topic, “Professionalizing Genealogy and Genealogical Research”. The goal of the Special Issue is to examine the impact of high-level educational and professional qualifications on the field of professional genealogy, and implications for genealogical research. At the forefront of this issue is the need for highlighting where genealogy sits as a professional discipline, as an academic subject and as an interdisciplinary research process. Contributors are asked to explain how and/or where genealogy education and praxis intersect, and the impact this might have on professionalising the field. The editorial team hopes to include a wide spectrum of disciplines and sub-disciplines and invites contributions that strengthen and broaden the framework for genealogy studies. Some potential authors with specific areas of focus have already been invited notably:

  • American emigrant returners to Scotland
  • DNA and Genetic Genealogy from Citizen Science to Cutting Edge
  • Evidence in genealogy from the legal/forensic standpoint
  • Oral History to Documented Genealogy
  • Proof Standards in Genealogy

Other submissions might include the following, although further ideas around the overall theme are welcome and encouraged:

  • Certification vs. Qualification
  • The impact and intersections of (e.g.) narrative theory, anthropology, ethnography, communications studies, psychology and sociology
  • Theoretical/epistemological framework of professional genealogy.

Author Fees do not apply to submissions made and accepted in 2017.

Dr. Bruce Durie
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
A “Fishy Tale”? The Fisher Hugheses of Pittenweem, Fife, Scotland: Oral tradition to Documented Genealogy
by Jenny Swanson
Genealogy 2017, 1(3), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy1030018 - 24 Jul 2017
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Abstract
The surname HUGHES (several spelling variants) was numerous amongst the fishers recorded in 19th century censuses for Pittenweem, Fife, Scotland. A twentieth-century oral tradition in at least one HUGHES branch held that the family fished in Pittenweem for “hundreds of years”. This study [...] Read more.
The surname HUGHES (several spelling variants) was numerous amongst the fishers recorded in 19th century censuses for Pittenweem, Fife, Scotland. A twentieth-century oral tradition in at least one HUGHES branch held that the family fished in Pittenweem for “hundreds of years”. This study aimed to examine the tradition, using sound genealogical research techniques of record collection, critical assessment, comparison and analysis, and briefly sets the results in historical context. Lack of information from local vital records created some difficulties, but contextual strategies (for example collection of data for collateral relatives; analysis of baptismal records—particularly witness data—for social connections and possible occupation of baby’s parents) were used as supplements. Alternative strategies proved effective. Evidence was found for fishers in every generation of this direct male line for at least 200 years, with a possible paper-trail for nearly 300 years. A wider question arises over whether the many HUGHES fishers of Pittenweem were from one biological family. Records back to the 1720s suggest this is possible, but lack of earlier paper documentation allows alternative interpretations. Two members of the wider family have had Y-DNA testing which provided a good match—it was concluded that additional samples from descendants of particular, documented, 18th century lines might resolve this issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Professionalizing Genealogy and Genealogical Research)
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Conference Report
Americans and Return Migrants in the 1881 Scottish Census
by Tahitia L. McCabe
Genealogy 2017, 1(3), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy1030016 - 15 Jul 2017
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Abstract
This article reveals basic demographic information on Americans and Scottish return migrant parents of the 1321 American children listed in the 1881 Scottish census and investigates reasons for return migration from America to Scotland. Census information was downloaded into an Excel spreadsheet and [...] Read more.
This article reveals basic demographic information on Americans and Scottish return migrant parents of the 1321 American children listed in the 1881 Scottish census and investigates reasons for return migration from America to Scotland. Census information was downloaded into an Excel spreadsheet and data including occupation, age, relation to head of household, place of residence and length of time back in Scotland, were counted and listed. General causes of return migration are explored and specific reasons for migrants, especially coal miners, to return to Scotland are briefly touched upon; covering the economic downturn in America during the mid-1870s and tensions towards immigrants in the United States during this period. The results of a deeper genealogical study of four families are reported. More than two-thirds of the parents of American children listed were Scottish with others primarily Irish and English. There was a wide range of occupations with construction and coal mining having the greatest numbers. Most families were living in Lanarkshire and Midlothian but 28 other Scottish counties were found as places of residence. Further research is needed to identify whether American children and their Scottish families are represented in other census years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Professionalizing Genealogy and Genealogical Research)
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