Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 34517

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Education Faculty, Oranim Academic College, 3600600 Tivon, Israel
Interests: cyber psychology; teachers in the digital age; online risk behavior

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Guest Editor
School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee, 1510500 Lake Kinneret, Israel
Interests: cyber psychology; parents-child communication; risk behavior

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Internet use is known to have implications for physiological, emotional, cognitive, and social aspects. Findings concerning Internet use present positive aspects as well as negative aspects.

However, today, in the context of the worldwide COVID-19 outbreak, it is expected that Internet use will increase, as it is as a tool for learning, communicating, and leisure, especially for those who have experienced sustained lockdown. During this period the internet became a major tool in many lives, including for youngsters, adults, and the elderly. Many populations that did not typically use the Internet intensively had to start using it more (because of work tasks, online learning, etc.). Thus, it is important to examine the consequences of using the Internet today (during or after the lockdown). One main question that arises: Is it possible to find differences in the consequences of using the Internet in the current period compared to that before the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak?

This Special Issue calls for the submission of manuscripts related to Internet use (smartphone use, apps, social networks, etc.) during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and its effects on different aspects (physiological, emotional, cognitive, social, and family aspects).

Dr. Michal Dolev-Cohen
Dr. Meyran Boniel-Nissim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Internet use
  • COVID-19
  • Social networks
  • Smartphone use
  • Problematic internet use
  • Online communication
  • Online learning
  • Special populations
  • Psychological aspects
  • Age and gender differences

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 817 KiB  
Article
Impact of Digital Literacy and Problematic Smartphone Use on Life Satisfaction: Comparing Pre- and Post-COVID-19 Pandemic
by Busra Taskin and Chiho Ok
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(9), 1311-1322; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12090091 - 5 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3884
Abstract
Although the impact of digital literacy (DL) and problematic smartphone use (PSU) on life satisfaction was verified in previous literature, little is known about how the impact of two given variables can be differentiated during the COVID-19 pandemic situation. Thus, the purpose of [...] Read more.
Although the impact of digital literacy (DL) and problematic smartphone use (PSU) on life satisfaction was verified in previous literature, little is known about how the impact of two given variables can be differentiated during the COVID-19 pandemic situation. Thus, the purpose of this study was to empirically analyze whether the influence of DL and PSU on life satisfaction has changed as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. We applied a cross-sectional study design to analyze data obtained from a nationwide survey on smartphone overdependence conducted in 2019 and 2020 by the South Korean Ministry of Science and ICT and the National Information Society Agency. Large-scale data obtained from 41,883 individuals were analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. The results show that the positive relationship between digital literacy and life satisfaction was further strengthened post-COVID-19 rather than pre-COVID-19. In addition, the results suggest that the negative relationship between PSU and life satisfaction is further strengthened during post-COVID-19 rather than pre-COVID-19. The findings indicate that the roles of digital literacy and PSU are more important after the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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19 pages, 866 KiB  
Article
Students’ Perception towards New Face of Education during This Unprecedented Phase of COVID-19 Outbreak: An Empirical Study of Higher Educational Institutions in Saudi Arabia
by Mohammad Asif, Mohammed Arshad Khan and Sufyan Habib
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(7), 835-853; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12070061 - 19 Jul 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 7476
Abstract
Purpose: To examine the perception of students regarding an e-learning system adopted by various educational institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methodology: A web-based-survey was conducted among selected university students in Saudi Arabia. A total of 294 students [...] Read more.
Purpose: To examine the perception of students regarding an e-learning system adopted by various educational institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methodology: A web-based-survey was conducted among selected university students in Saudi Arabia. A total of 294 students were randomly chosen to determine the utilities and credibility of the adopted e-learning mode of education. The reliability of latent constructs was assessed according to Cronbach’s alpha, and confirmatory factors analysis was conducted via AMOS software (version 24) to measure the students’ perceptions of online learning. Results: The outcomes of the present study reveal that e-learning has been very useful throughout the pandemic period among selected Saudi Arabian universities. The students have a positive view of the online system of education, which has many benefits, including flexibility, low cost, self-learning, and convenience. Implications: The results of the present study will be beneficial for all educational institutions that are largely dependent on the findings of the online survey. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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22 pages, 393 KiB  
Article
Online Feedback Systems and Debate on Scientific Issues during COVID-19: A Case Study on Sookmyung Women’s University
by Ji-yoon Kim, Min-kyeong Shim and Young-mee Hwang
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 494-515; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12050037 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1945
Abstract
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, university education and feedback guidance have inevitably moved to online platforms, becoming a global trend. This study focuses on a case of Sookmyung Women’s University in South Korea, which has operated an online discussion clinic for university general [...] Read more.
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, university education and feedback guidance have inevitably moved to online platforms, becoming a global trend. This study focuses on a case of Sookmyung Women’s University in South Korea, which has operated an online discussion clinic for university general education for more than a year as a case study. There are two main research methods. A frequency analysis was conducted to confirm what kind of counseling the students preferred at the discussion clinic based on the answers written in the students’ applications. The students whose applications were used for the analysis were divided into 57 teams, and there were two to six members per team. The results were as follows: In the survey results, students wanted help with the preparation process necessary for the discussion and the practical strategies for facilitating discussions. They wanted personalized counseling, demonstrating that discussion education provided in the foundational curriculum is insufficient. Second, the educational model of the discussion clinic and educational examples were examined. The findings confirmed that online discussion education is effective if the system is technically supplemented. Instructors and researchers are prepared to meet students’ demands for feedback and individual counseling, even if these are not provided through face-to-face discussions. Additionally, face-to-face guidance can be operated more effectively by taking advantage of online systems. The findings also demonstrate that further research on designing and operating online discussion centers is required. This study is a preceding study on developing online systems and educational guidelines for higher educational institutions to present new insights into smart learning. This paper also includes suggestions for educational and scientific discussions. The online discussion instructional model shown in this paper explores methods of scientific communication through a debate on scientific issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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16 pages, 904 KiB  
Article
Children’s Online Collaborative Storytelling during 2020 COVID-19 Home Confinement
by Cristina Alonso-Campuzano, Giuseppe Iandolo, María Concetta Mazzeo, Noelia Sosa González, Michelle Jin Yee Neoh, Alessandro Carollo, Giulio Gabrieli and Gianluca Esposito
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(4), 1619-1634; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11040115 - 10 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4467
Abstract
Digital collaborative storytelling can be supported by an online learning-management system like Moodle, encouraging prosocial behaviors and shared representations. This study investigated children’s storytelling and collaborative behaviors during an online storytelling activity throughout the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 home confinement in Spain. From 1st to [...] Read more.
Digital collaborative storytelling can be supported by an online learning-management system like Moodle, encouraging prosocial behaviors and shared representations. This study investigated children’s storytelling and collaborative behaviors during an online storytelling activity throughout the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 home confinement in Spain. From 1st to 5th grade of primary school, one-hundred-sixteen students conducted weekly activities of online storytelling as an extracurricular project of a school in Madrid. Facilitators registered participants’ platform use and collaboration. Stories were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the Bears Family Story Analysis System. Three categories related to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic were added to the story content analysis. The results indicate that primary students worked collaboratively in an online environment, with some methodology adaptations to 1st and 2nd grade. Story lengths tended to be reduced with age, while cohesion and story structure showed stable values in all grades. All stories were balanced in positive and negative contents, especially in characters’ behavior and relationships, while story problems remained at positive solution levels. In addition, the pandemic theme emerged directly or indirectly in only 15% of the stories. The findings indicate the potential of the online collaborative storytelling activities as a distance-education tool in promoting collaboration and social interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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11 pages, 307 KiB  
Article
Insecure Attachment Styles and Unbalanced Family Functioning as Risk Factors of Problematic Smartphone Use in Spanish Young Adults: A Relative Weight Analysis
by Sonia Mangialavori, Claudia Russo, Maria Veronica Jimeno, Jorge Javier Ricarte, Giulio D’Urso, Daniela Barni and Marco Cacioppo
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(3), 1011-1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11030075 - 4 Sep 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3341
Abstract
Young adulthood is the life stage during which people are more prone to develop problematic smartphone use (PSU). Only one study investigated the relationship among attachment styles, family functioning, and PSU, but thus far, no research has shown the relative importance that such [...] Read more.
Young adulthood is the life stage during which people are more prone to develop problematic smartphone use (PSU). Only one study investigated the relationship among attachment styles, family functioning, and PSU, but thus far, no research has shown the relative importance that such dimensions may have on PSU. The main aim of this study was to analyze to what extent insecure attachment styles and unbalanced family functioning are related to PSU, investigating the specific weight of each dimension in a sample of young adults (N = 301; 82.7% females; Mage = 22.89; SD = 3.02). Participants completed a self-report questionnaire, including the Relationship Questionnaire, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV, and the Smartphone Addiction Scale. The regression and relative weight analyses results showed that preoccupied attachment style and disengaged, chaotic, and enmeshed family functioning were positively related to PSU. Implications for future research and interventions were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
14 pages, 580 KiB  
Article
Mental Health of Teachers Who Have Teleworked Due to COVID-19
by Claudia Palma-Vasquez, Diego Carrasco and Julio C. Hernando-Rodriguez
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(2), 515-528; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020037 - 9 Jun 2021
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 7822
Abstract
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on education included school closures and the implementation of virtual teaching and teleworking without the knowledge or resources needed to do so. This situation accentuated the inequality in accessing quality education and generated high rates of stress, [...] Read more.
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on education included school closures and the implementation of virtual teaching and teleworking without the knowledge or resources needed to do so. This situation accentuated the inequality in accessing quality education and generated high rates of stress, anxiety, and general discomfort in teachers. This study aimed to explore the mental health of teachers who were forced to telework because of COVID-19, and to analyze the association with sociodemographic, teacher-related, and working conditions. The sample was 278 classroom teachers in Chile who teleworked more than 50% during the 2020 academic year. The participants were mostly women (82%) who entered the teaching profession at age 30 or younger (87%) and worked two or more unpaid overtime hours per day (67%). The dependent variable was mental health measured through the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). The independent variables were sociodemographic, teacher-related, and work conditions. The internal structure of the mental health construct was evaluated using the Rasch model. Crude odds ratios (cORs) and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were estimated using logistic regression models. A high rate of poor mental health was identified in teachers (58%). The variables associated with poor mental health were working in a private–subsidized school (aOR = 2.89; 95% CI: 1.16–7.22), working two or more unpaid overtime hours (aOR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.11–4.59), and being absent due to sickness (aOR = 3.82; 95% CI: 1.53–9.58). These results provide evidence suggesting the need for actions to improve the working conditions of teachers who telework in order to improve their mental health, and thus have a positive impact on the entire educational community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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10 pages, 907 KiB  
Article
Impact of Web-Based Meeting Platform Usage on Overall Well-Being among Higher Education Employees
by Martha E. Kershaw, Shannon P. Lupien and Jennifer L. Scheid
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(2), 372-381; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe11020028 - 19 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3833
Abstract
During the ongoing global pandemic, faculty, staff and administrators at colleges and universities experienced an increase in meetings using web-based platforms. Challenges were identified related to the changes from face-to-face to web-based meetings, including internet connectivity, inadequate technology and distractions in the online [...] Read more.
During the ongoing global pandemic, faculty, staff and administrators at colleges and universities experienced an increase in meetings using web-based platforms. Challenges were identified related to the changes from face-to-face to web-based meetings, including internet connectivity, inadequate technology and distractions in the online environment, which led to questions about how meetings that use web-based platforms may contribute to overall stress and well-being during the pandemic. The research related to the use of web-based meeting platforms is limited. However, some anecdotal evidence suggests that impacts from web-based meeting platforms could include frustration, sleep issues and fatigue, which contribute to overall well-being. The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between a number of potentially related web-based meeting factors including the frequency and length of the meetings and comfort level with the platform and overall well-being. This study involved (N = 164) male, female and nonbinary participants over 18 years of age who worked as tenured, tenure-track, or nontenure track faculty, staff and administrators at colleges/universities in the United States during the global pandemic. The participants were recruited via both social media and email and were provided with a link to the survey tool, which included demographic and web-based meeting questions (e.g., frequency, length, and comfort) along with scales to measure perceived stress, subjective well-being, mental fatigue and sleep quality. The current study did not find a relationship between the frequency of meetings and overall well-being (p = 0.294). However, statistically significant relationships were found between meeting length and overall well-being (p = 0.003) and between comfort with the web-based meeting platform and overall well-being (p = 0.030). Based on the findings of this study, meeting organizers may consider scheduling meetings for less than two hours and providing training to ensure participants are proficient in the web-based meeting platform in order to support overall well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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