Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging and Theranostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 310

Special Issue Editors

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Timisoara, Timisoara, Romania
Interests: ultrasound imaging; obstetrics and gynecology; prenatal medicine
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Grigore T Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iasi, Romania
Interests: prenatal screening and diagnosis; maternal fetal medicine; fetal ultrasound; preeclampsia; fetal growth restriction; fetal heart
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Cringu Ionescu
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Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology "St Pantelimon" Clinical Emergency Hospital, 'Carol Davila' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: prenatal screening and diagnosis; maternal fetal medicine; pregnancy complications; preeclampsia, preterm birth screening; IUGR, fetal heart, gynecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology has made significant strides in recent years. Ultrasound has become an indispensable tool in various aspects of obstetrics and gynecology, including fetal imaging, screening for birth defects, evaluation of the female reproductive system, and monitoring of pregnancy and fetal growth. The use of ultrasound has revolutionized prenatal care, allowing for early detection and management of complications, as well as providing valuable information for decision making in both routine and high-risk pregnancies. Furthermore, advancements in ultrasound technology and techniques have led to improved image quality, increased diagnostic accuracy, and expanded clinical applications. This Special Issue will bring together cutting-edge research, innovative methodologies, and expert perspectives to showcase the current state of ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology, while also shedding light on future directions and potential breakthroughs in this rapidly evolving field.

Prof. Dr. Dan Bogdan Navolan
Prof. Dr. Dragos Nemescu
Prof. Dr. Cringu Ionescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ultrasound
  • ultrasonography
  • obstetrics and gynecology
  • prenatal medicine
  • maternal fetal medicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2205 KiB  
Article
Fetal Left Ventricle Function Evaluated by Two-Dimensional Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography across Clinical Stages of Severity in Growth-Restricted Fetuses
Diagnostics 2024, 14(5), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14050548 - 05 Mar 2024
Abstract
Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can result in adverse perinatal outcomes due to cardiac dysfunction. This study used 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography to assess left ventricle (LV) longitudinal strain across FGR severity stages. A prospective longitudinal cohort study measured global (GLS) and segmental LV longitudinal [...] Read more.
Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can result in adverse perinatal outcomes due to cardiac dysfunction. This study used 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography to assess left ventricle (LV) longitudinal strain across FGR severity stages. A prospective longitudinal cohort study measured global (GLS) and segmental LV longitudinal strain in FGR fetuses, with evaluations conducted at various time points. FGR was classified into subtypes based on published criteria using fetal weight centile and Doppler parameters. A linear mixed model was employed to analyze repeated measures and compare Z-score measurements between groups throughout gestational age. The study included 40 FGR fetuses and a total of 107 evaluations were performed: 21 from small for gestational age (SGA), 74 from the FGR stage I, and 12 from the FGR stage ≥ II. The results indicate that SGA and stage I FGR fetuses exhibit higher LV GLS than stages ≥ II. Throughout gestation, SGA and FGR stage I fetuses showed similar behavior with consistently better LV GLS values when compared to FGR stages ≥ II. No significant differences were observed in LV GLS strain behavior between SGA and FGR stage I. In conclusion, all FGRs show signs of early cardiac dysfunction, with severe cases demonstrating significantly a lower LV GLS when compared to mild cases, suggesting deterioration of cardiac dysfunction with progression of fetal compromise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology)
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