Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) as a New Diagnostic Tool in Ocular and Systemic Diseases—Third Edition

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 981

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health Eye Clinic, University of Florence, AOU Careggi, 50139 Florence, Italy
Interests: retinal imaging; medical retina; OCT; OCT angiography
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Guest Editor
1. Ophthalmology Unit, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, 00168 Rome, Italy
2. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), 56124 Pisa, Italy
Interests: surgical retina
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research, and Child Health, Eye Clinic, University of Florence, AOU Careggi, 50139 Florence, Italy
Interests: surgical retina; medical retina
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the Diagnostics Editorial Team, I am delighted to present a Special Issue on the topic of Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) as a new diagnostic tool in clinical disease.

We are currently assisting in the evolution and revolution of retinal diagnostic imaging. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) is increasingly becoming a popular tool for retinal imaging in many retinal diseases, where it provides new and useful insights. It enables the rapid, non-invasive, and detailed evaluation of the retinal and choroidal vascular networks, facilitating the evaluation of the retina-choroidal flow layer by layer, with a separated evaluation of the different retinochoroidal plexi that may be involved individually or separately in various pathological diseases. OCTA can provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the retinal and choroidal microvascularization. There is growing interest in the potential role of OCTA in providing early diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. This is why increased interest in this new retinal imaging tool is also emerging in the field of systemic non-ocular pathologies.

This Special Issue aims to evaluate the use of OCTA as a new diagnostic tool in ocular and systemic pathologies in order to evaluate the possibility of obtaining new potential diagnostic biomarkers and create multidisciplinary integration between clinical medicine and the field of retinal imaging.

After all, the retina is a window into our central nervous system and vascularization; it would be interesting if we could also let our non-ophthalmologist colleagues look into this window.

Accepted papers will describe new applications in these areas. This Special Issue accepts high-quality articles containing original research results and case reports as well as review articles.

Dr. Daniela Bacherini
Prof. Dr. Stanislao Rizzo
Prof. Dr. Fabrizio Giansanti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • optical coherence tomography angiography
  • non-invasive retinal imaging
  • biomarkers
  • Ocular and Systemic Diseases
  • diagnostics

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Article
Correlations between Retinal Microvascular Parameters and Clinical Parameters in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: An Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Study
by Alexandra Oltea Dan, Carmen Luminița Mocanu, Andrei Teodor Bălășoiu, Cornelia Andreea Tănasie, Ileana Puiu, Anca Elena Târtea and Veronica Sfredel
Diagnostics 2024, 14(3), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14030317 - 1 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Objectives: In the current study, we investigated the correlations between retinal microvascular parameters using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and clinical parameters for a group of 69 young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Materials and Methods: This retrospective, exploratory study enrolled [...] Read more.
Objectives: In the current study, we investigated the correlations between retinal microvascular parameters using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and clinical parameters for a group of 69 young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Materials and Methods: This retrospective, exploratory study enrolled 69 patients between 5 years old and 30 years old who met the inclusion criteria. All the study participants underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination and OCTA scans for the evaluation of the retinal microcirculation. The retinal OCTA parameters were correlated with the following clinical parameters: the patient’s age at the onset of the disease, the duration of T1DM, the BMI at the time of enrollment in the study, the HbA1C values at onset, the mean values of HbA1C over the period of monitoring the disease and the degree of DKA at onset. Results: For the study group, the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) area and perimeter correlated positively with the mean value of HbA1C (Pearson correlation, Sig.2-Tailed Area: 0.044; perimeter: 0.049). The total vessel density in the superficial capillary plexus (SCP) correlated negatively with the duration of T1DM, based on the superior and inferior analyzed areas (Spearman correlation, Sig.2-Tailed SCP in total region: 0.002; SCP in the superior region: 0.024; SCP in the inferior region: 0.050). The foveal thickness also correlated negatively with the levels of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at onset (Spearman correlation, Sig.2-Tailed: 0.034) and the levels of HbA1C at onset (Spearman correlation, Sig.2-Tailed: 0.047). Further on, the study patients were distributed into two groups according to the duration of the disease: group 1 included 32 patients with a duration of T1DM of less than 5 years, and group 2 included 37 patients with a duration of T1DM of more than 5 years. Independent t-tests were used to compare the OCTA retinal parameters for the two subgroups. While the FAZ-related parameters did not show significant statistical differences between the two groups, the vessel densities in both the SCP and DCP were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusions: Our data suggest that specific alterations in OCTA imaging biomarkers correlate with various clinical parameters: the FAZ area and perimeter increase with higher mean values of HbA1C, leading to poor metabolic control. Moreover, the SCP total vessel density decreases as the duration of T1DM increases. Regarding the vessel densities in the SCP and the DCP, they decrease with a duration of the disease of more than 5 years. Full article
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