Lithium Niobate Crystals

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016)

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Département d'Optique, NanoOptics Group, Institut FEMTO-ST, 15B Avenue des Montboucons, F-25030 Besançon, France
Interests: nanophotonics; lithium niobate

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lithium niobate (LN) is one of the most important materials used in photonics. It underlies the modulation technologies that enable Internet communications, and is used in a large number of frequency conversion applications. These applications, however, barely scratch the surface of its potential as a functional material if it were possible to develop a robust material platform for lithium niobate in integrated optics that would pave the way for integration in photonic chips. In order to achieve such ambitious objectives, thin films of lithium niobate, subsequent micro and nanoscale engineering, and hybridation with materials like silicon are of key importance in order to design a to fabricate efficient optical functions that could replace the microelectronic equivalent ones.

The objective of the Special Issue, “Lithium Niobate Crystals”, is to show novel achievements to master the micro and nanometer-scale engineering of lithium niobate crystals with the aim of designing ambitious optical functions in footprint dimensions. It will focus on the research of lithium niobate thin films, nano and micro structuring/etching, and the multiple applications in integrated optics, sensors, and acoustics.

It is with great pleasure that I invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Maria-Pilar Bernal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Lithium Niobate
  • epitaxial growth
  • thin film technology
  • micro and nanoscale domain engineering
  • hybridation
  • photonic applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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3368 KiB  
Article
Domain Patterning in Ion-Sliced LiNbO3 Films by Atomic Force Microscopy
by Tatyana Volk, Radmir Gainutdinov and Haihua Zhang
Crystals 2017, 7(5), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7050137 - 14 May 2017
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 6019
Abstract
Photonic structures denoted as LNOI (LiNbO3-on-insulator) are of considerable interest for integrated optics due to a high refractive-index contrast provided by the interface LiNbO3/insulator. A topical problem for LNOI-based optical waveguides is optical-frequency conversion, in particular realized on ferroelectric [...] Read more.
Photonic structures denoted as LNOI (LiNbO3-on-insulator) are of considerable interest for integrated optics due to a high refractive-index contrast provided by the interface LiNbO3/insulator. A topical problem for LNOI-based optical waveguides is optical-frequency conversion, in particular realized on ferroelectric domains on the basis of quasi phase-matching principle. This paper presents extended studies on the fabrication of domain patterns by atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods (raster lithography, piezo-force microscopy, conductive AFM) in single-crystal ion-sliced LiNbO3 films forming LNOI sandwiches. A body of data obtained on writing characteristics of domains and specified 1D and 2D domain patterns permitted us to manipulate the domain sizes and shapes. Of special importance is the stability of created patterns, which persist with no degradation during observation times of months. The domain coalescence leading to the transformation of a discrete domain pattern to a continuous one was investigated. This specific effect—found in thin LiNbO3 layers for the first time—was attributed to the grounding of space-charges accumulated on domain walls. Observations of an enhanced static conduction at domain walls exceeding that in surrounding areas by not less than by five orders of magnitude supports this assumption. AFM domain writing in ion-sliced films serves as a basis for studies in nonlinear photonic crystals in integrated optical schemes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium Niobate Crystals)
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3649 KiB  
Article
Numerical and Experimental Study of Optoelectronic Trapping on Iron-Doped Lithium Niobate Substrate
by Michela Gazzetto, Giovanni Nava, Annamaria Zaltron, Ilaria Cristiani, Cinzia Sada and Paolo Minzioni
Crystals 2016, 6(10), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst6100123 - 23 Sep 2016
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 4669
Abstract
Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) are a promising technique for the realization of reconfigurable systems suitable to trap and manipulate microparticles. In particular, dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces produced by OET represent a valid alternative to micro-fabricated metal electrodes, as strong and spatially reconfigurable electrical fields can [...] Read more.
Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) are a promising technique for the realization of reconfigurable systems suitable to trap and manipulate microparticles. In particular, dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces produced by OET represent a valid alternative to micro-fabricated metal electrodes, as strong and spatially reconfigurable electrical fields can be induced in a photoconductive layer by means of light-driven phenomena. In this paper we report, and compare with the experimental data, the results obtained by analyzing the spatial configurations of the DEP-forces produced by a 532 nm laser beam, with Gaussian intensity distribution, impinging on a Fe-doped Lithium Niobate substrate. Furthermore, we also present a promising preliminary result for water-droplets trapping, which could open the way to the application of this technique to biological samples manipulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium Niobate Crystals)
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5462 KiB  
Article
Add-Drop Filter Based on Wavelength-Dependent Light Interlink between Lithium-Niobate Microwaveguide Chip and Microfiber Knot Ring
by Suxu Zhou, Yuan Wang, Donghui He, Yang Hu, Jianhui Yu, Zhe Chen, Heyuan Guan, Jun Zhang, Yunhan Luo, Jieyuan Tang and Huihui Lu
Crystals 2016, 6(6), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst6060067 - 9 Jun 2016
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4512
Abstract
In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate an add-drop filter based on wavelength-dependent light coupling between a lithium-niobate (LN) microwaveguide chip and a microfiber knot ring (MKR). The MKR was fabricated from a standard single-mode fiber, and the LN microwaveguide chip works as a [...] Read more.
In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate an add-drop filter based on wavelength-dependent light coupling between a lithium-niobate (LN) microwaveguide chip and a microfiber knot ring (MKR). The MKR was fabricated from a standard single-mode fiber, and the LN microwaveguide chip works as a robust substrate to support the MKR. The guided light can be transmitted through add and drop functionality and the behaviors of the add-drop filter can be clearly observed. Furthermore, its performance dependence on the MKR diameter is also studied experimentally. The approach, using a LN microwaveguide chip as a platform to couple and integrate the MKR, may enable us to realize an optical interlink between the microstructured chip and the micro/nano fiber-optic device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lithium Niobate Crystals)
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