Materials and Devices Grown via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1845

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China
Interests: III-V semidonductor materials; optoelectronics; MBE

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China
Interests: semiconductors; materials physics; thermoelectrics; optoelectronics; molecular beam epitaxy

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK
Interests: molecular beam epitaxy; topological materials; two-dimensional (2D) layered materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is a highly advanced deposition technique renowned for its capacity to produce high-quality thin films. Its unique capability to precisely control deposition processes at the atomic level empowers researchers to push the boundaries of material science, enabling unparalleled exploration of physical properties and phenomena. While MBE has effectively served its purpose for decades, ongoing progress is characterized by the continuous development of innovative materials, novel structures, as well as advanced growth techniques and characterization methods.

The aim of this Special Issue, focused on "Materials and Devices Fabricated via Molecular Beam Epitaxy," is to assemble and showcase the wealth of innovative concepts involving novel structures, pioneering growth techniques, device physics and characterisation methods that have been realized through the application of molecular beam epitaxy. We warmly welcome the submission of both research articles and review articles. All submitted manuscripts will undergo standard journal peer-review procedures, and those accepted for publication will be featured in this Special Issue.

Dr. Daqian Guo
Dr. Wuyang Ren
Prof. Dr. Thorsten Hesjedal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epitaxy growth
  • lattice-mismatch epitaxy
  • heterostructure
  • superlattice
  • characterization methods
  • semiconductor devices

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 19295 KiB  
Article
Low-Temperature Migration-Enhanced Epitaxial Growth of High-Quality (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-Doped InAlAs Quantum Wells for THz Applications
by Linsheng Liu, Zhen Deng, Guipeng Liu, Chongtao Kong, Hao Du, Ruolin Chen, Jianfeng Yan, Le Qin, Shuxiang Song, Xinhui Zhang and Wenxin Wang
Crystals 2024, 14(5), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14050421 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 447
Abstract
This investigation explores the structural and electronic properties of low-temperature-grown (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs and InGaAs/Be-doped InAlAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs), utilizing migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth mode. Through comprehensive characterization methods including transmission electron microscopy [...] Read more.
This investigation explores the structural and electronic properties of low-temperature-grown (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs and InGaAs/Be-doped InAlAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs), utilizing migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth mode. Through comprehensive characterization methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), pump–probe transient reflectivity, and Hall effect measurements, the study reveals significant distinctions between the two types of MQWs. The (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs grown via the MEE mode exhibit enhanced periodicity and interface quality over the InGaAs/Be-InAlAs MQWs grown through the conventional molecule beam epitaxy (MBE) mode, as evidenced by TEM. The AFM results indicate lower surface roughness for the (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs by using the MEE mode. Raman spectroscopy reveals weaker disorder-activated modes in the (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs by using the MEE mode. This originates from utilizing the (InAs)4(GaAs)3 short period superlattices rather than InGaAs, which suppresses the arbitrary distribution of Ga and In atoms during the InGaAs growth. Furthermore, pump–probe transient reflectivity measurements show shorter carrier lifetimes in the (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs, attributed to a higher density of antisite defects. It is noteworthy that room temperature Hall measurements imply that the mobility of (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs grown at a low temperature of 250 °C via the MEE mode is superior to that of InGaAs/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs grown in the conventional MBE growth mode, reaching 2230 cm2/V.s. The reason for the higher mobility of (InAs)4(GaAs)3/Be-doped InAlAs MQWs is that this short-period superlattice structure can effectively suppress alloy scattering caused by the arbitrary distribution of In and Ga atoms during the growth process of the InGaAs ternary alloy. These results exhibit the promise of the MEE growth approach for growing high-performance MQWs for advanced optoelectronic applications, notably for high-speed optoelectronic devices like THz photoconductive antennas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Devices Grown via Molecular Beam Epitaxy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 3112 KiB  
Article
Improvement of Mg-Doped GaN with Shutter-Controlled Process in Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy
by Ying-Chieh Wang, Ikai Lo, Yu-Chung Lin, Cheng-Da Tsai and Ting-Chang Chang
Crystals 2023, 13(6), 907; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst13060907 - 1 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1036
Abstract
Mg-doped GaN was grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on a Fe-doped GaN template substrate by employing a shutter-controlled process. The transition from n-type to p-type conductivity of Mg-doped GaN in relation to the N/Ga flux ratio was studied. The [...] Read more.
Mg-doped GaN was grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on a Fe-doped GaN template substrate by employing a shutter-controlled process. The transition from n-type to p-type conductivity of Mg-doped GaN in relation to the N/Ga flux ratio was studied. The highest p-type carrier concentration in this series was 3.12 × 1018 cm−3 under the most N-rich condition. By modulating the shutters of different effusion cells for the shutter-controlled process, a wide growth window for p-type GaN was obtained. It was found that the presence of Mg flux effectively prevents the formation of structural defects in GaN epi-layers, resulting in the improvement of crystal quality and carrier mobility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Devices Grown via Molecular Beam Epitaxy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop