Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Characterization, Deposition and Modification".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2021) | Viewed by 12688

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
The Department of Architecture and Design of Wood Products, Kazan National Research Technological University, Kazan 420015, Russia
Interests: wood-filled composite materials; drying and thermal moisture treatment of materials; impregnation; protection of wood and wood materials; building materials and technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Design of Wood Products, Kazan National Research Technological University (KNRTU), Kazan 420015, Russia
Interests: Thermal modification of wood

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit your work to this Special Issue on "Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials". The scope of this Special Issue is on preliminary preparation of the surface of wood raw materials in the production of composite materials to improve the quality of the finished products.

In particular, the topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Production of composite materials: treatment to improve the adhesion properties of wood materials in gluing processes;
  • Processing of raw materials before applying coatings;
  • Pretreatment in impregnation and modification processes.

Prof. Ruslan Rushanovich Safin
Dr. Aigul Ravilevna Shaikhutdinova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vegetable raw materials
  • wood
  • composite materials
  • surface pretreatment
  • modification

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 169 KiB  
Editorial
Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials
by Ruslan Rushanovich Safin, Ruslan Khasanshin, Shamil Ramilevich Mukhametzyanov and Albina Safina
Coatings 2021, 11(10), 1247; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11101247 - 14 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1277
Abstract
Wood is a vital and widespread natural material [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials)

Research

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11 pages, 2013 KiB  
Article
Improving the Physical and Mechanical Performance of Laminated Wooden Structures by Low-Temperature Plasma Treatment
by Ruslan Rushanovich Safin, Ruslan Khasanshin, Nour Galyavetdinov, Regina Salimgaraeva, Shamil Mukhametzyanov, Albina Safina and Natalia Kraysman
Coatings 2021, 11(8), 918; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11080918 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1854
Abstract
This paper considers the effect of RF plasma on wood in improving the adhesion of binders to wood by increasing its surface wettability. Our study reveals that radiofrequency (RF) plasma treatment causes a greater than threefold decrease in the marginal wetting angle of [...] Read more.
This paper considers the effect of RF plasma on wood in improving the adhesion of binders to wood by increasing its surface wettability. Our study reveals that radiofrequency (RF) plasma treatment causes a greater than threefold decrease in the marginal wetting angle of wood. The greatest effect is achieved in RF plasma treatment in argon, which is on average 5% greater than that of RF plasma treatment in air or in propane/nitrogen mixture. In addition, the power of the RF plasma torch has the greatest influence, and the main influence comes from the voltage applied to the RF plasma torch; current does not have such a significant effect. To achieve a significant effect, the duration of exposure should be at least 5 min, with a total power of 4.05 kW. Studies have been conducted to determine the adhesive strength of wood. An increase in the strength of laminated beams made from RF-treated bars in relation to control samples was found. The greatest impact on the adhesion strength was revealed when using PVA-based glue, compared with the use of polyurethane-based adhesives and urea-formaldehyde resin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials)
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19 pages, 5477 KiB  
Article
A Multi-Technique Approach to Evaluate the Surface Properties of Heat-Treated Chestnut Wood Finished with a Water-Based Coating
by Claudia Pelosi, Gianluca Rubino, Giuseppe Capobianco, Luca Lanteri, Giorgia Agresti, Giuseppe Bonifazi, Silvia Serranti, Rodolfo Picchio and Angela Lo Monaco
Coatings 2021, 11(6), 706; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11060706 - 11 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1826
Abstract
The aim of the present work is to investigate the surface properties and the effect of a water-based coating on chestnut wood (Castanea sativa Mill.), both untreated and thermally treated. Chestnut is very common throughout the Mediterranean region and its wood is [...] Read more.
The aim of the present work is to investigate the surface properties and the effect of a water-based coating on chestnut wood (Castanea sativa Mill.), both untreated and thermally treated. Chestnut is very common throughout the Mediterranean region and its wood is widely used as timber, especially in Central Italy, to build window fixtures and doors which have to be decay-resistant, even in historical buildings. Traditional techniques have been used in combination with Hyperspectral Imaging which had never been used before to examine thermally treated wood. Specifically, colour, roughness, micro-hardness, wear and contact angle measurements have been performed on untreated and thermally treated chestnut wood, covered by a commercial water-based coating named Idrolinfo. Hyperspectral analysis has been demonstrated to be appropriate to discriminate the heat treatment and the presence of the water-based product. The applied techniques showed that the best performances are obtained with the 170 °C heat treatment. The water-based coating demonstrated its validity when applied to untreated and heat-treated wood at 140 °C and 170 °C. The main findings showed that chestnut wood increased or maintained its properties if treated at those temperatures without undergoing a major colour change, acquiring good hydrophobicity, both if uncoated or treated with the water-based coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials)
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10 pages, 2154 KiB  
Article
Potential Use of the Pigments from Scytalidium cuboideum and Chlorociboria aeruginosa to Prevent ‘Greying’ Decking and Other Outdoor Wood Products
by Sarath M. Vega Gutierrez, Derek W. Stone, Rui He, Patricia T. Vega Gutierrez, Zielle M. Walsh and Seri C. Robinson
Coatings 2021, 11(5), 511; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11050511 - 26 Apr 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2286
Abstract
UV-light degradation of wood is one of the top reasons for consumer replacement of outdoor wooden structures. This type of degradation is seldom mechanical, and is instead often motivated by loss of aesthetics (graying). There are numerous commercial products available on the market [...] Read more.
UV-light degradation of wood is one of the top reasons for consumer replacement of outdoor wooden structures. This type of degradation is seldom mechanical, and is instead often motivated by loss of aesthetics (graying). There are numerous commercial products available on the market that deal with this loss of color, many of which contain added pigments to ‘rejuvenate’ or ‘revitalize’ greyed wood. These pigments are almost uniformly synthetic. In contrast, pigments from wood decay fungi (spalting), which have been used in woodworking since the 1400s (intarsia), have remarkable optical (UV-light resistance) properties due to their naphthoquinonic configuration. In recent years the pigments made from these fungi have been extracted and tested across numerous substrates, from solar cells to textile dyes. In this work, researchers extracted pigments from Scytalidium cuboideum (red pigmentation) and Chlorociboria aeruginosa (blue-green pigmentation), solubilized the pigments in raw linseed oil, and tested the resulting solution on samples of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western white pine (Pinus monticola). These mixtures were compared against a ‘stain and coat’ treatment (utilizing an aniline stain and coated with raw linseed oil), raw linseed oil, and untreated wood. The wood samples were then placed in an accelerated weathering machine (Q-UV) following the ASTM G154 standard, for 500 and 1000 h. The results showed that while no visible color change occurred to the wood when the pigmented oil was applied, the red pigment oil significantly lowered the coating degradation for both wood types at an exposure of 500 h. The results show the potential applications for fungal pigments in the wood coating industry, as it offers an increased coating service life. As there is a shift to renewable products, the pigments from wood decay fungi show potential as additives for wood coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials)
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13 pages, 2261 KiB  
Article
Increasing the Strength of the Glue Line in the Production of Thermally Modified Wood Paneling
by Ruslan Rushanovich Safin, Aigul Ravilevna Shaikhutdinova, Ruslan Khasanshin, Shamil Mukhametzyanov and Albina Safina
Coatings 2021, 11(2), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020253 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1592
Abstract
This work is devoted to the study of the effect of ultraviolet rays for the surface activation of pine wood thermally modified at temperatures of 180−240 °C in order to increase the surface roughness, enhance the wettability of thermal wood and the adhesive [...] Read more.
This work is devoted to the study of the effect of ultraviolet rays for the surface activation of pine wood thermally modified at temperatures of 180−240 °C in order to increase the surface roughness, enhance the wettability of thermal wood and the adhesive strength of the glue in the production of wood block furniture panels. Studies were carried out to measure the contact angle of wettability of thermally modified wood samples of pine, as a result of which it was determined that the ultraviolet treatment process contributes to an increase in the adhesion properties of the surface layer of thermally modified wood by more than 13% due to the reactivity of ultraviolet rays to oxidize and degrade ligno-containing wood products. At the same time, the most active process of surface activation takes place during 60 min of ultraviolet irradiation of wood with a total irradiation of at least 125 W/cm2. It was revealed that the combined effect of two-stage wood processing, including preliminary volumetric thermal modification followed by surface ultraviolet treatment, causes an increase in the moisture resistance of glued wood products by 24%. So, if the strength of the glue seam when gluing natural wood samples after boiling decreased by 46%, then the samples that underwent two-stage processing showed a decrease only by 22%. In connection with the results obtained, an improved technology for the production of furniture boards for the manufacture of moisture-resistant wood products is proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials)
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10 pages, 3966 KiB  
Article
Sorption of Methylene Blue for Studying the Specific Surface Properties of Biomass Carbohydrates
by Tatiana Skripkina, Ekaterina Podgorbunskikh, Aleksey Bychkov and Oleg Lomovsky
Coatings 2020, 10(11), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10111115 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2942
Abstract
The surface area is an important parameter in setting any biorefining technology. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of sorption of methylene blue to characterize the surface of the main biomass carbohydrates: α-cellulose, sigmacell cellulose, natural gum, β-glucan, and [...] Read more.
The surface area is an important parameter in setting any biorefining technology. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of sorption of methylene blue to characterize the surface of the main biomass carbohydrates: α-cellulose, sigmacell cellulose, natural gum, β-glucan, and starch. The morphology of particles of the model objects was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the selected carbohydrates are macroporous adsorbents. The monolayer capacities, the energy constants of the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) equation, and specific surface areas were calculated using the BET theory, the comparative method proposed by Gregg and Sing, and the Harkins–Jura method. The method of methylene blue sorption onto biomass carbohydrates was adapted and mastered. It was demonstrated that sorption of methylene blue proceeds successfully in ethanol, thus facilitating surface characterization for carbohydrates that are either soluble in water or regain water. It was found that the methylene blue sorption values correlate with specific surface area determined by nitrogen adsorption/desorption and calculated from the granulometric data. As a result of electrostatic attraction, the presence of ion-exchanged groups on the analyte surface has a stronger effect on binding of methylene blue than the surface area does. Sorption of methylene blue can be used in addition to gas adsorption/desorption to assess the accessibility of carbohydrate surface for binding large molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical Surface Treatment of Wood Raw Materials)
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