Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Coatings for Biomedicine and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 15727

Special Issue Editors

Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
Interests: coatings and films; characterization and testing; materials science; biomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institut de Thermique, Mécanique et Matériaux (ITheMM), Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), Reims, France
Interests: electrochemical deposition; electrophoretic deposition; biomaterials; prosthetic coatings; calcium phosphates; bioactive glasses; bone substitutes; electron microscopy; X-ray microanalysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ageing of the worldwide population requires the continuous development of advanced biomaterials and coatings by academic and industrial research. Inside the body, the implanted materials need specific biological, chemical, and mechanical properties for a good interaction with the surrounding tissues. Specifically, orthopaedic and dental surgeries need bone implants with enhanced properties and an extended lifespan. To reach this objective, many research labs focus their works on improving the osseointegration of bone implants by modifying the surface of prosthetic alloys with bioactive coatings made of calcium phosphate or bioglass. These coatings support bone cell growth at the surface of the implant, promoting the formation of an intimate link with the surrounding bone tissues.

Several methods can be used to synthesize bioactive coatings on prosthetic alloys such as plasma spraying, magnetron sputtering, pulsed laser-deposition, electrophoretic deposition, or electrodeposition. Among them, low-temperature processes can be used to add organic components (polymers, proteins, drugs, etc.) inside the prosthetic coatings in order to enhance the biological and mechanical properties of the biomaterials.

In that framework, this Special Issue aims to present the latest developments in this field.

In particular, the topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Advanced biomaterials;
  • Calcium phosphate coatings for bone implant applications;
  • Bioglass coatings for bone implant applications;
  • Bone implants with enhanced biological properties;
  • Bone implants with enhanced mechanical properties.

Dr. Richard Drevet
Prof. Dr. Hicham Benhayoune
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced biomaterials
  • bioactive coatings
  • calcium phosphate
  • bioglass
  • bone implant
  • functionalization of biomaterials
  • biocompatibility
  • bioactivity

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 197 KiB  
Editorial
Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings
Coatings 2022, 12(7), 965; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12070965 - 07 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1254
Abstract
Everywhere on Earth, people are living longer and longer [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings)

Research

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16 pages, 3757 KiB  
Article
Influence of TiO2 on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Hydroxyapatite HaP + TiO2 Nanocomposites Deposited Using Spray Pyrolysis
Coatings 2023, 13(7), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13071283 - 21 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 888
Abstract
Titanium oxides and their alloys are widely used in medical applications because of their biocompatibility. However, they are characterized by their low resistance to corrosion. The HaP + TiO2 nanocomposites’ coating was applied in different experiments, especially on a Ti-6Al-4V substrate with [...] Read more.
Titanium oxides and their alloys are widely used in medical applications because of their biocompatibility. However, they are characterized by their low resistance to corrosion. The HaP + TiO2 nanocomposites’ coating was applied in different experiments, especially on a Ti-6Al-4V substrate with the spray pyrolysis process to deal with such weakness. The TiO2 content effects on the surface morphology and the phase composition were investigated using a scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDXS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties were determined with nanoindentation. The potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and simulated body fluid (SBF) solution environment tests were carried out to investigate the corrosion resistance of HaP + TiO2/Ti6Al4V systems. The experimental findings revealed that sprayed thin films possessed uniform morphology. The coatings’ nanoindentations proved that the HaP + 20% TiO2 coating hardness (252.77 MPa) and the elastic modulus (52.48 GPa) overtopped those of the pure hydroxyapatite coatings. The corrosion test demonstrated that the corrosion current density of about 36.1 µA cm−2 and the corrosion potential of the order of −392.7 mV of HaP + 20% TiO2 was lower compared to the pure HaP coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings)
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15 pages, 5063 KiB  
Article
Powder Synthesized from Aqueous Solution of Calcium Nitrate and Mixed-Anionic Solution of Orthophosphate and Silicate Anions for Bioceramics Production
Coatings 2023, 13(2), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13020374 - 07 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1867
Abstract
Synthesis from mixed-anionic aqueous solutions is a novel approach to obtain active powders for bioceramics production in the CaO-SiO2-P2O5-Na2O system. In this work, powders were prepared using precipitation from aqueous solutions of the following precursors: [...] Read more.
Synthesis from mixed-anionic aqueous solutions is a novel approach to obtain active powders for bioceramics production in the CaO-SiO2-P2O5-Na2O system. In this work, powders were prepared using precipitation from aqueous solutions of the following precursors: Ca(NO3)2 and Na2HPO4 (CaP); Ca(NO3)2 and Na2SiO3 (CaSi); and Ca(NO3)2, Na2HPO4 and Na2SiO3 (CaPSi). Phase composition of the CaP powder included brushite CaHPO4‧2H2O and the CaSi powder included calcium silicate hydrate. Phase composition of the CaPSi powder consisted of the amorphous phase (presumably containing hydrated quasi-amorphous calcium phosphate and calcium silicate phase). All synthesized powders contained NaNO3 as a by-product. The total weight loss after heating up to 1000 °C for the CaP sample—28.3%, for the CaSi sample—38.8% and for the CaPSi sample was 29%. Phase composition of the ceramic samples after the heat treatment at 1000 °C based on the CaP powder contained β-NaCaPO4 and β-Ca2P2O7, the ceramic samples based on the CaSi powder contained α-CaSiO3 and Na2Ca2Si2O7, while the ceramics obtained from the CaPSi powder contained sodium rhenanite β-NaCaPO4, wollastonite α-CaSiO3 and Na3Ca6(PO4)5. The densest ceramic sample was obtained in CaO-SiO2-P2O5-Na2O system at 900 °C from the CaP powder (ρ = 2.53 g/cm3), while the other samples had densities of 0.93 g/cm3 (CaSi) and 1.22 (CaPSi) at the same temperature. The ceramics prepared in this system contain biocompatible and bioresorbable phases, and can be recommended for use in medicine for bone-defect treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings)
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14 pages, 3348 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Graphene Oxide on Polycaprolactone PCL Surfaces: Antimicrobial Activity and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cell
Coatings 2022, 12(6), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12060799 - 08 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1640
Abstract
In dentistry, bone regeneration requires osteoinductive biomaterial with antibacterial properties. Polycaprolactone (PCL) may be combined with different nanofillers including reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Here, the amount of rGO filler was defined to obtain a biocompatible and antibacterial PCL-based surface supporting the adhesion and [...] Read more.
In dentistry, bone regeneration requires osteoinductive biomaterial with antibacterial properties. Polycaprolactone (PCL) may be combined with different nanofillers including reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Here, the amount of rGO filler was defined to obtain a biocompatible and antibacterial PCL-based surface supporting the adhesion and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Compounds carrying three different percentages of rGO were tested. Among all, the 5% rGO-PCL compound is the most bacteriostatic against Gram-positive bacteria. All scaffolds are biocompatible. MSCs adhere and proliferate on all scaffolds; however, 5% rGO-PCL surface supports the growth of cells and implements the expression of extracellular matrix components necessary to anchor the cells to the surface itself. Moreover, the 5% rGO-PCL surface has superior osteoinductive properties confirmed by the improved alkaline phosphatase activity, mineral matrix deposition, and osteogenic markers expression. These results suggest that 5% rGO-PCL has useful properties for bone tissue engineering purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings)
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14 pages, 3879 KiB  
Article
Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Fibroblasts
Coatings 2021, 11(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11010107 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2593
Abstract
Advances in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) has created promising progress in biotechnology and consumer-care based industry. This has created an increasing need for testing their safety and toxicity profiles. Hence, efforts to understand the cellular responses towards nanomaterials are needed. However, current [...] Read more.
Advances in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) has created promising progress in biotechnology and consumer-care based industry. This has created an increasing need for testing their safety and toxicity profiles. Hence, efforts to understand the cellular responses towards nanomaterials are needed. However, current methods using animal and cancer-derived cell lines raise questions on physiological relevance. In this aspect, in the current study, we investigated the use of pluripotent human embryonic stem cell- (hESCs) derived fibroblasts (hESC-Fib) as a closer representative of the in vivo response as well as to encourage the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement) concept for evaluating the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silicon-dioxide (SiO2) NPs. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the adverse effects of respective NPs were observed in hESC-Fib beyond concentrations of 200 µg/mL (SiO2 NPs), 30 µg/mL (TiO2 NPs) and 20 µg/mL (ZnO NPs). Flow cytometry results correlated with increased apoptosis upon increase in NP concentration. Subsequently, scratch wound assays showed ZnO (10 µg/mL) and TiO2 (20 µg/mL) NPs inhibit the rate of wound coverage. DNA damage assays confirmed TiO2 and ZnO NPs are genotoxic. In summary, hESC-Fib could be used as an alternative platform to understand toxicity profiles of metal oxide NPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings)
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Review

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89 pages, 9015 KiB  
Review
Calcium Orthophosphate (CaPO4)-Based Bioceramics: Preparation, Properties, and Applications
Coatings 2022, 12(10), 1380; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12101380 - 21 Sep 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 5214
Abstract
Various types of materials have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A short time later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. [...] Read more.
Various types of materials have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A short time later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. Bioceramics can be prepared from diverse inorganic substances, but this review is limited to calcium orthophosphate (CaPO4)-based formulations only, due to its chemical similarity to mammalian bones and teeth. During the past 50 years, there have been a number of important achievements in this field. Namely, after the initial development of bioceramics that was just tolerated in the physiological environment, an emphasis was shifted towards the formulations able to form direct chemical bonds with the adjacent bones. Afterwards, by the structural and compositional controls, it became possible to choose whether the CaPO4-based implants would remain biologically stable once incorporated into the skeletal structure or whether they would be resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of regenerative bioceramics was developed, and such formulations became an integrated part of the tissue engineering approach. Now, CaPO4-based scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are usually porous and harbor various biomolecules and/or cells. Therefore, current biomedical applications of CaPO4-based bioceramics include artificial bone grafts, bone augmentations, maxillofacial reconstruction, spinal fusion, and periodontal disease repairs, as well as bone fillers after tumor surgery. Prospective future applications comprise drug delivery and tissue engineering purposes because CaPO4 appear to be promising carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides, and various types of cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biomaterials and Coatings)
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