Flexible Electronic Devices and Systems for Sensing Applications

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrochemical Devices and Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 9883

Special Issue Editors

School of Information Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, China
Interests: micro-/nanodevices; opto-electronic devices; nanophotonic devices

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Guest Editor
School of Microelectronics, Shandong University, Jinan 250101, China
Interests: flexible electronics; nonvolatile memory devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Information Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, China
Interests: photonic materials; photonic device design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Flexible electronics has garnered tremendous attention both in the academic and industrial society. As one of its applications, flexible electronic sensors have also found an increasingly wide utilization in various fields in real life. Compared to their rigid counterparts, flexible sensors show the merit of flexibility and can be conformed to irregular shapes. As such, they can be used in different application scenarios spanning from health diagnostics to environmental monitoring. In recent years, a burgeoning research interest also lies in the development of multifunctional or multimode sensing devices that can deal with different types of external stimuli on a single platform and are thought to be indispensable in the development of compact and portable integrated sensing systems. This Special Issue aims to highlight the latest progress in flexible electronic devices and systems for sensing applications. Both review and original research articles on the design, synthesis, fabrication, and characterization of flexible sensors are welcome.

This special issue covers experimental research work on flexible sensors based on various principles and their implemention methods based on nano-micro technologies, which matche the scope of "Chemosensors".

Dr. Song Gao
Prof. Dr. Yang Li
Dr. Wenjing Yue
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • flexible electronic devices
  • integrated systems
  • nano-micro technology
  • gas sensors
  • humidity sensors
  • biosensors
  • mechanical sensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3244 KiB  
Article
Dual-Mode Stretchable Sensor Array with Integrated Capacitive and Mechanoluminescent Sensor Unit for Static and Dynamic Strain Mapping
by Song Wang, Xiaohui Yi, Ye Zhang, Zhiyi Gao, Ziyin Xiang, Yuwei Wang, Yuanzhao Wu, Yiwei Liu, Jie Shang and Run-Wei Li
Chemosensors 2023, 11(5), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11050270 - 2 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1611
Abstract
Electronic skin (e-skin) has the potential to detect large-scale strain, which is typically achieved by integrating multiple strain sensors into an array. However, the latency and limited resolution of sensing have hindered its large-scale sensing applications. Here, we have developed a high-resolution detection [...] Read more.
Electronic skin (e-skin) has the potential to detect large-scale strain, which is typically achieved by integrating multiple strain sensors into an array. However, the latency and limited resolution of sensing have hindered its large-scale sensing applications. Here, we have developed a high-resolution detection sensing system capable of detecting static and dynamic strain with a simple fabrication process by combining capacitive and mechanoluminescent (ML) sensor units. An elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite film doped with ZnS:Cu and BaTiO3(BT) particles are fabricated as the functional film of the capacitive sensor. In contrast, the transparent electrode was fabricated on the surface of the as-prepared film. By incorporating BT nanoparticles into the elastic substrate, the ML intensity of the ZnS:Cu was improved up to 2.89 times that without BT addition, and the sensitivity of the capacitive sensor was increased as well. The capacitive part of the sensor presented a GF of 0.9 and good stability, while the ML part exhibited excellent performance, making it suitable for both static and dynamic sensing. Furthermore, the strain sensor integrated by 10 × 10 sensing units is demonstrated to detect large-scale strain with high resolution. Moreover, finger joint strain distribution tracking is achieved by attaching the strain sensor unit to the finger joint. With these characteristics, the e-skin may have great potential for bio-motion monitoring and human-computer interaction applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronic Devices and Systems for Sensing Applications)
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12 pages, 2740 KiB  
Article
Design and Fabrication of Flexible Copper Sensor Decorated with Bismuth Micro/Nanodentrites to Detect Lead and Cadmium in Noninvasive Samples of Sweat
by Anderson M. de Campos, Robson R. Silva, Marcelo L. Calegaro and Paulo A. Raymundo-Pereira
Chemosensors 2022, 10(11), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10110446 - 27 Oct 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 7875
Abstract
The use of economic methods to design and fabricate flexible copper sensors decorated with bismuth micro/nanodentrites for the detection of lead and cadmium in sweat is demonstrated. The flexible copper sensors were constructed with simple and cost-effective materials; namely, flexible and adhesive conductive [...] Read more.
The use of economic methods to design and fabricate flexible copper sensors decorated with bismuth micro/nanodentrites for the detection of lead and cadmium in sweat is demonstrated. The flexible copper sensors were constructed with simple and cost-effective materials; namely, flexible and adhesive conductive copper tape, adhesive label containing the design of a three-electrode electrochemical system, and nail polish or spray as a protective layer. The flexible copper device consisted of a working electrode decorated with bismuth micro/nanodentrites using an electrodeposition technique, a copper pseudo-reference and copper counter electrodes. Under optimal experimental conditions, the flexible sensing platform showed excellent performance toward the detection of lead and cadmium using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) in a wide linear range from 2.0 μM to 50 μM with acceptable reproducibility and repeatability, and limits of detection and quantification of 5.36 and 17.9 μM for Cd2+ ions and 0.76 μM and 2.5 for Pb2+ ions. Studies of addition and recovery in spiked artificial sweat sample were performed, with a recovery of 104.6%. The flexible copper device provides a great opportunity for application in wearable perspiration-based healthcare systems or portable sensors to detect toxic metals in biological samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronic Devices and Systems for Sensing Applications)
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