Microfluidic Device Based Chemical and Biochemical Sensors

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrochemical Devices and Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2024 | Viewed by 4293

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto de Química San Luis (INQUISAL), Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, CONICET, Chacabuco 917, San Luis D5700BWS, Argentina
Interests: nanotechnology; microfluidic device; biosensors; immunosensors; electrochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Química San Luis (INQUISAL), Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, CONICET, Chacabuco 917, San Luis D5700BWS, Argentina
Interests: microsensors; nanomaterials; electrochemical biosensors; biomarkers

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Guest Editor
Liquid Biopsy and Metastasis Research Group, GENYO, Centre for Genomics and Oncological Research: Pfizer/University of Granada/Andalusian Regional Government PTS, Granada, Avenida de la Ilustración, 114, 18016 Granada, Spain
Interests: microfluidic sensors; platforms; cancer markers; amperometric sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microfluidic devices coupled to sensors or immunosensors offer benefits such as small sample volumes, rapid turnaround times, and low cost. These devices consist of microchannels for transporting fluids, with part or all of the necessary components of an assay procedure being integrated into the device. Moreover, microfluidic technology is one of the most striking technologies that can be integrated with electrochemical or optical sensing systems to improve the overall performance of detection systems.

This Special Issue of Chemosensors aims to collect the latest research in the field of microfluidic sensors applied to anatyte determination in biological, pharmaceutical, agricultural, or environmental samples. Analytical work on all types of microfluidic sensors is welcome. Both original research papers and review articles will be considered for publication.

Areas of particular interest to this Special Issue include but are not limited to:

  • Electrochemical sensors;
  • Microsensors-based nanomaterials;
  • Optical sensors;
  • Microfluidic devices.

Dr. Martín A. Fernández Baldo
Dr. Matías D. Regiart
Prof. Dr. Francisco G. Ortega
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microfluidic device
  • platform
  • electrochemical
  • nanomaterials
  • sensors
  • biosensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2664 KiB  
Article
Origami Paper-Based Electrochemical Immunosensor with Carbon Nanohorns-Decorated Nanoporous Gold for Zearalenone Detection
by Anabel Laza, Sirley V. Pereira, Germán A. Messina, Martín A. Fernández-Baldo, Julio Raba, Matías D. Regiart and Franco A. Bertolino
Chemosensors 2024, 12(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors12010010 - 5 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
Nowadays, mycotoxin contamination in cereals and wastewater exposes a safety hazard to consumer health. This work describes the design of a simple, low-cost, and sensitive origami microfluidic paper-based device using electrochemical detection for zearalenone determination. The microfluidic immunosensor was designed on a paper [...] Read more.
Nowadays, mycotoxin contamination in cereals and wastewater exposes a safety hazard to consumer health. This work describes the design of a simple, low-cost, and sensitive origami microfluidic paper-based device using electrochemical detection for zearalenone determination. The microfluidic immunosensor was designed on a paper platform by a wax printing process. The graphitized carbon working electrode modified with carbon nanohorns-decorated nanoporous gold showed a higher surface area, sensitivity, and adequate analytical performance. Electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The determination of zearalenone was carried out through a competitive immunoassay using specific antibodies immobilized by a covalent bond on the electrode surface. In the presence of HRP-labeled enzyme conjugate, substrate, and catechol, zearalenone was detected employing the developed immunosensor by applying −0.1 V to the working electrode vs silver as a pseudo-reference electrode. A calibration curve with a linear range between 10 and 1000 µg Kg−1 (R2 = 0.998) was obtained, and the limit of detection and quantification for the electrochemical immunosensor were 4.40 and 14.90 µg Kg−1, respectively. The coefficient of variation for intra- and inter-day assays was less than 5%. The selectivity and specificity of the sensor were evaluated, comparing the response against zearalenone metabolites and other mycotoxins that could affect the corn samples. Therefore, origami is a promising approach for paper-based electrochemical microfluidic sensors coupled to smartphones as a rapid and portable tool for in situ mycotoxins detection in real samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Device Based Chemical and Biochemical Sensors)
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13 pages, 4576 KiB  
Article
Microfluidic Detection of Adenylate Kinase as a Cell Damage Biomarker
by Cristiana Domingues, Pedro Mendes Fontes, Pedro G. M. Condelipes, Vanda Marques, Marta B. Afonso, Virginia Chu, Cecília M. P. Rodrigues and João Pedro Conde
Chemosensors 2023, 11(4), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11040220 - 2 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2004
Abstract
In vitro cell cultures are used as models for drug discovery. The detection of cell damage biomarkers such as adenylate kinase (AK) is often used in drug screening and cell biology experiments. A microfluidic platform for AK detection was developed with the capability [...] Read more.
In vitro cell cultures are used as models for drug discovery. The detection of cell damage biomarkers such as adenylate kinase (AK) is often used in drug screening and cell biology experiments. A microfluidic platform for AK detection was developed with the capability of detecting the AK resulting from the lysis of 10–100 human colorectal adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells. For this assay, AK was captured on the surface of microbeads integrated into a microfluidic device and optically detected using a fluorescently labelled anti-AK antibody. Microfluidic technologies have in addition been used to develop two- and three-dimensional cell culture models that have the potential to accelerate drug discovery. The microfluidic platform was used to detect the AK resulting from the lysis of HCT116 cells cultivated in a microfluidic biochip, demonstrating the potential for the integration of the miniaturised biosensor with the cell chip. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidic Device Based Chemical and Biochemical Sensors)
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