Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Therapy for Gynecologic Malignancies

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Therapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2024) | Viewed by 701

Special Issue Editors

Gynaecologic Oncology Unit, 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Alexandra Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 11528 Athens, Greece
Interests: gynecologic oncology; endometrial cancer; cervical cancer; ovarian cancer; vulvar cancer; cytoreductive surgery
Gynaecologic Oncology Unit, 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Alexandra Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 11528 Athens, Greece
Interests: gynecologic oncology; endometrial cancer; cervical cancer; ovarian cancer; vulvar cancer; cytoreductive surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Gynecological cancer accounts for approximately 1.3 million deaths a year worldwide. More than 3 million women are expected to be diagnosed with malignant lesions of the female tract annually. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been widely used on neo-adjuvant and adjuvant bases to help increase the survival of patients with advanced-stage disease. Although significant benefits have been observed for their use over the last decade, gynecological cancer is far from being defeated; hence, new strategies are evolving in the field. 

In the present Special Issue, we would like to welcome contributions that will include original research articles (clinical and preclinical), reviews or shorter perspective articles that emphasize the benefit and pitfalls of adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies in gynecological cancer patients. Topics such as but not limited to neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapies for ovarian, endometrial, cervical and vulvar cancers, with an emphasis on their impact on survival outcomes and patient-reported outcomes, including quality of life, are welcome in the present Special Issue.

We hope that leading experts will share their perspectives on the clinical management and outcome of patients with gynecological cancer and will contribute to current knowledge with novel evidence that will provide the groundwork for further research.

Dr. Dimitrios Haidopoulos
Dr. Vasilios Pergialiotis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • adjuvant therapy
  • neoadjuvant therapy
  • chemotherapy
  • radiotherapy
  • targeted treatment
  • ovarian cancer
  • endometrial cancer
  • vulvar cancer
  • cervical cancer

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 781 KiB  
Article
Splenectomy as Part of Maximal-Effort Cytoreductive Surgery in Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer
Cancers 2024, 16(4), 790; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16040790 - 15 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Introduction: A splenectomy is frequently performed during debulking surgery for advanced ovarian cancer. Its impact on perioperative and survival outcomes remains questionable as current evidence is conflicting. In the present study, we sought to determine the factors that affect survival rates in ovarian [...] Read more.
Introduction: A splenectomy is frequently performed during debulking surgery for advanced ovarian cancer. Its impact on perioperative and survival outcomes remains questionable as current evidence is conflicting. In the present study, we sought to determine the factors that affect survival rates in ovarian cancer patients that undergo a splenectomy as part of maximal-effort cytoreduction. Patients and methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted that included all epithelial ovarian cancer patients that had surgical cytoreduction for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Differences among splenectomized and non splenectomized patients were evaluated as well as the impact of known risk factors on survival outcomes of splenectomized patients. Results: Overall, 245 patients were identified and 223 were included in the present series, of whom 91 had a splenectomy. Recurrence rates as well as death rates were comparable among splenectomized and non-splenectomized patients; however, both the disease-free survival (log-rank = 0.001), as well as the overall survival of splenectomized patients (log-rank = 0.006), was shorter. Thrombotic events as well as rates of pulmonary embolism were comparable. Sepsis was more common among splenectomized patients. The site of splenic metastases did not influence patients’ survival. Among splenectomized patients, those offered primary debulking had longer progression-free survival (log-rank = 0.042), although their overall survival did not differ compared to patients submitted to interval debulking. Complete debulking significantly improved the overall survival compared to optimal debulking (log-rank = 0.047). Splenectomized patients that developed sepsis had worse overall survival (log-rank = 0.005). Discussion: The findings of our study support the feasibility of splenectomy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer; however, its impact on patients’ survival is considerable. Therefore, every effort should be made to avoid splenic injury which will result in unintended splenectomy for non-oncological reasons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Therapy for Gynecologic Malignancies)
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