Dealing with Extreme Heat: Intelligent Approaches for Improved Building Performance and Occupant Thermal Comfort

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2024) | Viewed by 527

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yong-in 17104, Republic of Korea
Interests: building physics; thermal comfort; building performance modeling; urban heat islands; indoor environments
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extreme heat, particularly in urban areas, is a serious issue with dire effects on buildings, building systems, and building occupants. We know, for instance, that extreme heat increases energy use for space cooling, reduces the efficacy of HVAC systems, and decreases the thermal satisfaction of building occupants. All this transforms into (i) increased overall building energy use, which has a direct economic and environmental impact, (ii) suboptimal performance of building systems, which in itself has a plethora of sub-effects, such as heightened maintenance requirements, and (iii) multi-faceted issues related to occupant wellbeing, including reduced productivity and sickness in very extreme cases. Such issues will only worsen under future changing climates and rapid urbanization. Consequently, intelligent methods for managing extreme heat under the changing climate are critically important to ensure the (i) efficiency and sustainability of our buildings, such as assisting buildings in how they effectively and passively respond to very high temperatures; (ii) understanding the behavior of building systems and improving their efficiency under extreme temperatures, including optimizing the performance of such systems with minimal energy use; and (iii) developing effective rationale for designing conducive thermal environments for building occupants, for example, understanding occupant behavior under extreme heat conditions and subsequently controlling indoor environments to optimize occupant thermal comfort while minimizing energy usage.

The main aim of this Special Issue is to explore recent approaches in heat management for sustainable buildings and occupant comfort. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • smart building materials
  • cool roofs, green roofs, and walls
  • intelligent controls for solar insolation and ventilation
  • climate-responsive dynamic facades and their control
  • intelligent controls of HVAC systems
  • digital twins for indoor thermal environment management
  • simulation and modeling of extreme heat in buildings
  • smart energy management systems in buildings
  • heat governance and policy frameworks

Dr. Jack Ngarambe
Prof. Dr. Baojie He
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • smart building materials
  • cool roofs, green roofs, and walls
  • intelligent controls for solar insolation and ventilation
  • climate-responsive dynamic facades and their control
  • intelligent controls of HVAC systems
  • digital twins for indoor thermal environment management
  • simulation and modeling of extreme heat in buildings
  • smart energy management systems in buildings
  • heat governance and policy frameworks

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 7460 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Performance of a Combined Vertical Wall–Horizontal Roof Solar Chimney for the Natural Ventilation of Buildings
by Y Quoc Nguyen and Trieu Nhat Huynh
Buildings 2024, 14(6), 1501; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14061501 - 22 May 2024
Viewed by 284
Abstract
The natural ventilation of buildings can be achieved effectively with solar chimneys, which are classified into wall, roof, and combined wall–roof configurations. Among the combined systems investigated in the literature, vertical wall–horizontal roof solar chimneys have not been evaluated thoroughly. This study investigates [...] Read more.
The natural ventilation of buildings can be achieved effectively with solar chimneys, which are classified into wall, roof, and combined wall–roof configurations. Among the combined systems investigated in the literature, vertical wall–horizontal roof solar chimneys have not been evaluated thoroughly. This study investigates the performance of a combined vertical wall–horizontal roof solar chimney numerically. A two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is employed to examine the flow and thermal characteristics under various influencing factors relating to the chimney’s geometry, the flow resistance caused by the bend connecting the vertical and horizontal portions, the reverse flow at the outlet, and the location of the heat source. Compared to a vertical wall chimney at the same cavity height, the combined system always had a lower flow rate but had a higher thermal efficiency at some length-to-total-height ratios. Heating the upper walls induced higher flow rates but lower thermal efficiency. Particularly, the effect of the bend on the flow rate was more important than that of the reverse flow at the outlet. These results imply that a combined chimney is preferred over a vertical one for heating applications, wherein the combined chimney should have transparent upper walls. Full article
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