Eco-Friendly Materials for Construction

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 2818

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Constructions, Faculty of Technology and Education, Suez University, Suez, Egypt
Interests: sustainability; eco-friendly materials; nanotechnology; concrete technology; green building

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Curtin University, Australia & Civil Engineering Department, Edith Cowan University (ECU), Perth, WA, Australia
Interests: green concrete; nanomaterials; sustainability; recycling materials; highway and geotechnical engineering; geopolymer concrete
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Construction of buildings around the world every year results in the consumption of tonnes of raw materials and the impoverishment of natural resources in different parts of the globe. In addition, as an outcome of a consuming society, developed countries are currently facing a major problem from the huge waste materials produced daily by their citizens. The disposal of these waste materials has turned into one of the critical issues of municipalities in modern cities. However, disposed waste material is not only limited to civil life, as they also come from some other source such as commercial, industrial, and the like. The worst part is a major portion of the produced waste materials leftovers intact for a long time. Consequently, results in increased pollution of the environment. This issue forces the authorities to find solutions, such as dumping waste in landfills around cities. The ideal solution is to use this waste as eco-friendly material in the construction industry. The selection of sustainable and eco-friendly materials can reduce the replacement cycle and hence conserve the rate of resource consumption. Sustainable and eco-friendly materials additionally contribute to reduced building operating costs including environmental impacts combined with maintenance and cleaning.

This Special Issue is conducted to investigate, evaluate, analyse, and emphasize the significance of using sustainable and eco-friendly materials in building and construction. This topic presents a fundamental challenge for design engineers, industry managers, and university researchers.

This Special Issue seeks original research and review articles that display the past and current development of sustainable and eco-friendly materials in building and construction. Moreover, this Special Issue involves exploring the feasibility and challenges of using eco-friendly materials in building and construction. This is an invitation to all construction and building engineers, materials researchers, and green building contractors and users to contribute experience and the results of research and consultancy projects.

Dr. Ibrahim Saad Agwa
Dr. Nuha Mashaan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • construction technology
  • environmental impact
  • green materials
  • recycling
  • waste materials
  • eco-friendly materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 8180 KiB  
Article
Reusing Ceramic Waste as a Fine Aggregate and Supplemental Cementitious Material in the Manufacture of Sustainable Concrete
by Walid E. Elemam, Ibrahim Saad Agwa and Ahmed M. Tahwia
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2726; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112726 - 29 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1007
Abstract
A viable strategy for promoting sustainable development and a cleaner environment is the reuse of demolition-related ceramic waste and ceramic manufacturing byproducts in the production of concrete. The purpose of this study is to assess the possibilities for using ceramic waste in the [...] Read more.
A viable strategy for promoting sustainable development and a cleaner environment is the reuse of demolition-related ceramic waste and ceramic manufacturing byproducts in the production of concrete. The purpose of this study is to assess the possibilities for using ceramic waste in the production of concrete as a fine aggregate and cementitious material. The effectiveness of concrete mixtures incorporating 20–100% ceramic waste fine (CWF) as a replacement for natural fine aggregate and 10–30% ceramic waste powder (CWP) in place of cement was evaluated. Their influence was assessed with respect to workability, mechanical performance, durability, and elevated temperature resistance. The results were analyzed via energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The findings illustrated that the increase in the replacement levels of CWP and CWF decreases the concrete workability. The mechanical performance of concrete mixtures is enhanced under compression and flexural tests as the replacement ratios of CWF and CWP increase up to 50% and 10% as replacements of sand and cement, respectively. The increases in compressive and flexural strength were 5.33% and 8.14%, respectively, at age 28 days. The concrete water permeability significantly increases as the CWF replacement ratio increases, and the incorporation of CWP reduces this negative impact. After exposure to 200, 400, 600, and 800 °C, the residual compressive strengths of concrete mixtures incorporating CWF and CWP were up to 95.02%, 89.66%, 74.33%, and 51.34%, respectively, compared to control mixtures, which achieved 84.25%, 76.03%, 59.36%, and 35.84% of their initial strength. Microstructure analysis revealed that combining CWP and CWF significantly improves cement hydration when compared to the reference mixture. Thus, the use of CWF and CWP in the production of masonry mortar might be an economical alternative that would aid in raising the recycling rate of demolition and construction debris and supporting sustainable growth in the building sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Friendly Materials for Construction)
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16 pages, 17962 KiB  
Article
Effect of Agricultural Phragmites, Rice Straw, Rice Husk, and Sugarcane Bagasse Ashes on the Properties and Microstructure of High-Strength Self-Compacted Self-Curing Concrete
by Hanan A. Marzouk, Mohammed A. Arab, Mohy S. Fattouh and Asmaa S. Hamouda
Buildings 2023, 13(9), 2394; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13092394 - 21 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Each year, billions of tons of agricultural waste are generated globally. Egypt, being an agriculturally centered nation, faces significant challenges in disposing of this waste and coping with self-germinating plants that negatively impact agriculture. The common practice among farmers is to burn the [...] Read more.
Each year, billions of tons of agricultural waste are generated globally. Egypt, being an agriculturally centered nation, faces significant challenges in disposing of this waste and coping with self-germinating plants that negatively impact agriculture. The common practice among farmers is to burn the waste, which exacerbates environmental concerns. With the global shift towards eco-friendly concrete, this study explores the utilization of agricultural waste ashes, particularly those abundant in Egypt and numerous other countries worldwide. Among the researched waste ashes are Phragmites ash (PGA), sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), rice husk ash (RHA), and rice straw ash (RSA). This investigation examines the impact of partially substituting cement with varying ash percentages from these wastes on the characteristics and properties of fresh and hardened high-strength self-compacting self-curing concrete (HSSCSCC). The findings indicate the potential applicability of these ashes in producing HSSCSCC, specifically highlighting the promising outcome of PG ash, which exhibited favorable results as a new type of natural ash suitable for the concrete industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-Friendly Materials for Construction)
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