Heat and Mass Transfer and Energy Efficiency in Building

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 3455

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
LERMAB - Laboratoire d'Etude sur le Matériaux Bois, University of Lorraine, 54000 Nancy, France
Interests: bio-based building materials; heat and mass transfer; building physics; energy efficiency; indoor environmental quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of green building has become a dominant trend and the public is becoming aware of the potential environmental benefits of this alternative to conventional construction. A new emerging field focused on the study of bio-based buildings is becoming the subject of several studies in order to understand and characterize their hygrothermal behavior and to reducing energy consumption and CO2 footprint while keeping acceptable hygrothermal comfort to occupants.

However, investigating the relative humidity variations and neglecting it may lead, in some circumstances, to underestimate the risk of condensation and mold growth cold indoor surfaces and thus leads to the deterioration of the material and alteration of the thermal resistance of the envelope. The understanding of the overall hygrothermal behavior of building appears to be incomplete and additional investigations are required.

This current Special Issue aims to collect the last findings in specific laboratory or in situ experimental studies or modeling data at different scales and building topics based on hygrothermal behavior effects for better understand the complex physics of coupled heat, air and mass transfers. These data can be however help in view of enhances knowledge in the field building design and  provide useful data for more sustainable and energy-saving buildings.

More examples of Special Issues of Buildings at:

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings/special_issues

Dr. Mourad Rahim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • in-situ monitoring of hygrothermal behavior of building envelope
  • modelisation of hygrothermal behavior of building in various conditions
  • investigation on the hygrothermal behavior of a new multilayer building envelope
  • hygrothermal behavior and moisture buffer potential
  • mould growth and risk assessment for emerging bio-based envelopes
  • sustainable hugroscopic material construction case studies
  • analyses for prediction of building hygrothermal performance
  • sustainable design and green buildings
  • lightweight construction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 11720 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Moisture Condensation on the Surface of the Bottom Chord of a Steel Truss of a Historical Building
by Oleksandr Semko, Oleg Yurin, Olena Filonenko, Volodymyr Semko, Roman Rabenseifer and Nataliia Mahas
Buildings 2023, 13(3), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13030766 - 14 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1397
Abstract
This paper investigates the conditions under which moisture condensation occurs on the surface of the bottom chord of a steel truss at the ceiling level of the attic hall of a historical building in Poltava, Ukraine. Moisture condensation on steel structural elements leads [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the conditions under which moisture condensation occurs on the surface of the bottom chord of a steel truss at the ceiling level of the attic hall of a historical building in Poltava, Ukraine. Moisture condensation on steel structural elements leads to steel corrosion and a decrease in the thickness of structural elements. As a result, the load-bearing capacity of both individual elements and the entire structure can be reduced. This paper describes how different parameters affect the process of condensate formation on the surface of steel bottom chord angles of the truss. Three parameters are investigated: the filling of the gap between the angles and precast reinforced concrete elements resting on the lower flange of the angles with thermal insulation; the filling of the gap between the two angles of the bottom chord of the truss with thermal insulation; and the possibility of detachment of the different sizes of finishing layer from the bottom flange surface of the angles. Verification calculations of the possibility of condensation forming on the metal surfaces of the bottom chord of trusses were also performed for the developed design solutions for restoration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat and Mass Transfer and Energy Efficiency in Building)
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17 pages, 3517 KiB  
Article
Air Pressure Differences over External Walls in New and Retrofitted Schools and Daycare Centers
by Antti Kauppinen, Mihkel Kiviste, Joni Pirhonen, Eero Tuominen, Anssi Laukkarinen, Petteri Huttunen and Juha Vinha
Buildings 2022, 12(10), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12101629 - 08 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1353
Abstract
Air pressure differences are a key factor in the behavior of building ventilation and air leakages through the building envelope. Field measurements of the air pressure differences over the building envelope were conducted in 24 Finnish municipal service buildings. The measured buildings were [...] Read more.
Air pressure differences are a key factor in the behavior of building ventilation and air leakages through the building envelope. Field measurements of the air pressure differences over the building envelope were conducted in 24 Finnish municipal service buildings. The measured buildings were mainly schools and daycare centers, of which half were new buildings and half recently retrofitted. All buildings had mechanical ventilation. The measurements were conducted during 2016–2018. The total number of measurement points was 100, and the duration of individual time series varied. According to the results, the mean air pressure difference was within the range of national recommendations (small underpressure indoors) in 81–89% of measurement points, but some cases experienced either strong underpressure or overpressure conditions. In some cases, the air pressure difference showed a clear stepwise constant behavior, while other cases showed larger temporal variation. The conditions varied between different operating situations and the time of year. The study also supports the current recommendation that air pressure difference measurements should be done as continuous measurements of at least one week duration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat and Mass Transfer and Energy Efficiency in Building)
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