Sustainable Building Materials for Infrastructure Application

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (23 January 2024) | Viewed by 1575

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane QLD 4001, Australia
Interests: sustainable composite construction; advanced composite materials; fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening; single- and double-skin hybrid tube; rehabilitation; sustainable material; microstructure analysis

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane 4000, Australia
Interests: sustainable composite construction; advanced composite materials; fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening; precast construction; connections in tubular members

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
Interests: sustainable composite construction; advanced composite materials; fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthening; masonry structures; auxetic materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable composite materials have gained popularity over conventional materials due to several advantages, including improved performance, increased durability, and reduced environmental impact. For example, the inclusion of waste rubber as a partial replacement for conventional aggregates in concrete is an option that not only makes concrete sustainable but also enhances its ductility and energy absorption capacity. With the unceasingly increasing usage of vehicles across the globe, the disposal of end-of-life tyres is a massive challenge. However, the associated reduction in its compressive strength, due to the use of rubber in concrete, can be overcome by confinement. Similarly, other varieties of waste materials such as recycled glass, industrial waste, health sector waste, fly ashes, etc., can be utilized to form members for building infrastructure applications by considering different loading conditions. The challenge is in reaching the standard strength of normal concrete by utilizing these sustainable waste materials.

Globally, we aim to move towards zero emissions and to provide a better life for the next generation. Therefore, it is recommended that scientists and researchers from other areas collaborate on research within this field and share their expertise on how to reduce waste and utilize it in the construction sector without compromising the standard capacity of infrastructure elements.

The proposed Special Issue would focus on the latest research and developments in the field of sustainable materials for building infrastructure application. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Performance of sustainable infrastructure or infrastructure elements;
  • Innovative uses of recycled plastic in building construction;
  • Sustainable building materials from recycled glass;
  • Advancements in utilizing recycled waste material in building applications;
  • Exploring the potential of recycled rubber or tyre chip for building and construction;
  • Eco-friendly construction with recycled metals and alloys;
  • State-of-the-art applications of recycled concrete in sustainable building applications;
  • Promoting circular economy: recycled waste material for building or building element construction;
  • Recycling industrial by-products for sustainable building applications.

We would be honoured to serve as the Guest Editors for this Special Issue and are confident that we could recruit a group of highly qualified authors to contribute to the publication. We believe that this Special Issue would be of great interest to your readership, which includes researchers, engineers, and architects.

Thank you for your consideration of this proposal. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss this further with you.

Sincerely,

Dr. Sabrina Fawzia
Dr. Nor Hafizah Ramli Sulong
Dr. Tatheer Zahra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable composite structures
  • sustainable material
  • circular economy
  • infrastructure sustainability
  • waste material
  • recycled material
  • sustainability in building

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3974 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Scrap Tires and Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement on the Behavior of Stone Columns
by Hoora Bikdeli, Morteza Jiryaei Sharahi, Baitollah Badarloo and Petr Lehner
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 733; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030733 - 08 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The objective of this investigation is to understand how to use waste tires to surround stone pillars and mix gravel with recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and stone pillars to provide an environmentally friendly and cost-effective weak layer improvement method. To study the behavior [...] Read more.
The objective of this investigation is to understand how to use waste tires to surround stone pillars and mix gravel with recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and stone pillars to provide an environmentally friendly and cost-effective weak layer improvement method. To study the behavior of such stone columns, experiments were conducted in units consisting of a single stone column with recycled asphalt pavement as filling material and a single stone column covered with old tires. To test the effect of different mixing ratios, rapeseed content was selected from 0% to 100%. Elasticity tests were conducted on cladded and nonclad stone column samples. Furthermore, direct shear tests were conducted on samples with different ratios of gravel and rapeseed mixtures. The results of the load-bearing capacity test show that the cover of the stone columns with old tires can significantly increase the load-bearing capacity. Replacing 25% of natural stone column aggregates with RAP increases the load capacity. But as the percentage of RAP in the mixture increases from 25% to 100%, the loading capacity decreases. Another advantage is the reinforced stone column. From the point of view of ecology, an advantage is the use of recyclable materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Building Materials for Infrastructure Application)
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19 pages, 3475 KiB  
Article
Load–Displacement Behaviour and a Parametric Study of Hybrid Rubberised Concrete Double-Skin Tubular Columns
by Shovona Khusru, David P. Thambiratnam, Mohamed Elchalakani and Sabrina Fawzia
Buildings 2023, 13(12), 3131; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13123131 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 713
Abstract
Rubberised concrete has emerged as a material of interest to the research community with the mission of creating sustainable structural members and decreasing the burden of waste tyre rubber. The potential benefits of replacing natural aggregates with rubber particles to obtain greater energy [...] Read more.
Rubberised concrete has emerged as a material of interest to the research community with the mission of creating sustainable structural members and decreasing the burden of waste tyre rubber. The potential benefits of replacing natural aggregates with rubber particles to obtain greater energy absorption and ductility are proven in the literature. To negate the reduction in capacity due to the addition of rubber particles, single- and double-skin confinements were proposed and successfully tested by researchers. Hybrid rubberised double-skin tubular columns (RuDSTCs) were recently trialled and tested by the authors. Each of these hybrid RuDSTCs had a filament-wound carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) outer tube and an inner steel tube with rubberised concrete as the sandwich material between the two tubes. To explore the axial behaviour of such a column, this paper develops a finite element modelling strategy and carries out a comprehensive parametric study of the hybrid RuDSTC with 0%, 15%, and 30% combined aggregates replaced with rubber particles. This methodology is validated by experimental results, and a good agreement is found. Hybrid RuDSTC models are developed in four groups with different material and geometric parameters, in addition to those corresponding to the experimentally tested column, to explore the effects of the thickness ratio, hollow ratio, steel tube yield strength, and CFRP tube diameter with a special focus on the transition of the characteristic bilinear stress–strain curve of the hybrid RuDSTCs. The results show the smooth transition of the stress–strain curve with increasing rubber content after the yielding of steel, which indicates better ductility of the rubberised columns. The novel hybrid RuDSTCs can provide a promising sustainable solution with greater capacity compared with their unconfined counterparts. Better strain and enhanced ductility of the hybrid RuDSTCs compared with non-rubberized hybrid DSTCs enable their use in seismic-prone regions and mining infrastructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Building Materials for Infrastructure Application)
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