Sustainable Architecture Regards to Global Challenges: Implementation and Evaluation

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2753

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Konstancińska 1, 02 942 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: housing architecture; timber structures; built environment; sustainable architecture; building technology; hybrid structures

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Architecture, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Bolesława Prusa 53/55, 50 317 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: energy-active architecture; sustainable architecture; housing architecture; sustainability education; circular economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The construction sector is responsible for half of the world's extraction of natural resources, nearly a third of total global final energy consumption, and one-third of global carbon dioxide emissions, and it also produces the most waste of any industry. The world is facing many challenges, such as climate change, environmental devastation, biodiversity loss, and waste and pollution, and also needs to deal with all their consequences. Rapid urban development, uncontrolled urban sprawl, and the heat island effect are taking place. At the same time, human needs, consumption, and the pursuit of comfort are growing. Given that the built environment has a significant impact on the goals and objectives of 2030–2050, this Special Issue focuses on cutting-edge research regarding responsive architectural and urban design. This Special Issue invites all kinds of integrated research that are aimed at real problem-solving through sustainable architecture. We invite designers, researchers and educators to exchange their knowledge and experience in order to improve the natural and built environment for future generations. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Low energy and low carbon buildings;
  • The embodied energy of materials;
  • The whole life cycle of buildings;
  • Zero waste constructions;
  • Environmental impact assessment;
  • Resilient cities and urban growth;
  • Energy-efficient and sustainable technologies;
  • Education towards and beyond sustainability.

Kindly regards,
Dr. Łukasz Mazur
Prof. Dr. Anna Bać
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable architecture
  • circular economy
  • building materials
  • energy efficiency
  • decarbonization
  • timber engineering
  • indoor and urban comfort
  • post occupancy evaluation
  • education

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 7616 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Design Approaches for Built Environment Professional Education: A Case Study on an Urban Design Studio
by Shulin Shi
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 836; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030836 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 751
Abstract
Urban built environment professions are facing challenges due to the less predictable future of cities, as well as the increasing expectations from clients and the general public. It is crucial to support and inform these professions with sound evidence in order to promote [...] Read more.
Urban built environment professions are facing challenges due to the less predictable future of cities, as well as the increasing expectations from clients and the general public. It is crucial to support and inform these professions with sound evidence in order to promote the sustainability of cities. However, there have been few efforts to introduce evidence-based design (EBD) theories and frameworks into built environment professional education. This study presents an EBD framework for an undergraduate urban design studio. The effectiveness and long-term impact of EBD approaches and the framework presented were examined via learning outcomes, student reflections, and guest comments across two rounds of studio delivery. The reflections and comments were coded and analyzed using NVivo 11. The effectiveness of the EBD approach is confirmed for the premises, development, and effectiveness of urban design proposals that align with the concerns and expectations of professional guests. The wide range of evidence and techniques also fosters cross-disciplinary collaborations. This study sheds light on education in the built environment disciplines, which would further enhance the strength of relevant professions, ultimately contributing to the sustainability of society. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 9494 KiB  
Article
External Wall Systems in Passive House Standard: Material, Thermal and Environmental LCA Analysis
by Łukasz Mazur, Olga Szlachetka, Katarzyna Jeleniewicz and Michał Piotrowski
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030742 - 9 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1346
Abstract
The construction sector, a significant consumer of energy, possesses the potential to realize substantial environmental and economic advantages through the adoption of innovative technologies and design approaches. Notably, the Passive House standard, exemplified by energy-efficient single-family homes, emerges as a prominent solution. This [...] Read more.
The construction sector, a significant consumer of energy, possesses the potential to realize substantial environmental and economic advantages through the adoption of innovative technologies and design approaches. Notably, the Passive House standard, exemplified by energy-efficient single-family homes, emerges as a prominent solution. This study analyzes five external wall systems across multiple stages: (i) a literature review and examination of external wall techniques within the passive standard, utilizing the Passive House Database; (ii) a material and technological assessment of three wood-based and two masonry constructions; (iii) an in-depth thermal performance analysis of selected external partitions; and (iv) a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the external wall systems. Our findings indicate that among the single-family homes built to the passive standard, 50.94% utilized timber constructions, while 34.21% employed masonry. Thermal analysis revealed that the masonry wall, EW-M-01, exhibited superior thermal efficiency with a heat transfer coefficient (U-value) of 0.0889 W/m2K. Meanwhile, the wooden wall, EW-T-01, led its category with a U-value of 0.1000 W/m2K. The LCA highlighted that the wooden wall EW-T-02 presented the lowest integrated non-renewable energy demand (PENTR) at 425.70 MJ/kg and the most favorable Global Warming Potential (GWP), with a reduction of 55.51 kg CO2e. Conversely, the masonry wall EW-M-01 recorded the highest energy demand and CO2e emissions, at 780.96 MJ/kg and 90.59 kg CO2e, respectively. Water consumption was lowest for the EW-T-02 wooden wall (0.08 m3) and highest for the EW-M-02 masonry wall (0.19 m3). Conclusively, our analysis of passive house external walls demonstrates that wood-based systems offer superior performance in terms of materials, thermal efficiency, and LCA indicators, positioning them as the preferred option for sustainable passive construction. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop