Actuators for Haptic Feedback Applications

A special issue of Actuators (ISSN 2076-0825). This special issue belongs to the section "Actuator Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 6517

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Power Mechanical Engineering and NEMS institute, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300044, Taiwan
Interests: piezoelectric film materials; electroactive polymers; microfabrication; sensor; microactuator; ultrasonic transducer; intelligent machine
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Guest Editor
Advanced Institute of Manufacturing with High-tech Innovations, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi, Taiwan
Interests: VR/AR machine tool simulation; interactive 3D machining simulation; remote virtual manufacturing

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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Florence, 50139 Florence, Italy
Interests: smart materials; stimuli-responsive materials; bioprinting; tissue engineering; biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, actuators for haptic feedback applications have attracted researchers’ attention due to their great market potential. Commercially, mobile phones, touch displays, and gaming accessories have broadly employed actuators to provide users with a better experience in terms of users’ sensory perceptions through haptic feedback.

Common haptic actuators include the types of eccentric rotating mass (ERM) motors, linear resonant actuators (LRAs), and piezo haptic actuators. In addition to these, advanced soft materials have displayed promising performances in terms of haptic actuator development. Utilizing haptic actuators has aroused a lot of interest in a variety of highly valued applications, especially in educating doctors on complicated surgeries or engineers on running expensive machinery.

This Special Issue will address the research on haptic actuators, from fundamental studies to versatile applications. Original research and review articles are encouraged. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Emerging design and fabrication of haptic actuators.
  • Driving circuit and control schemes for haptic actuators.
  • Performance investigation (e.g., strength of motion, electrical power consumption) of haptic actuators.
  • Qualitative perception studies on human interaction with haptic actuators.
  • Haptic actuators for applications in augmented reality (AR) or virtual reality (VR).
  • Haptic actuators for applications in robot manipulation or medical surgery.
  • Actuators for haptic feedback applications in industrial smart manufacturing.

Dr. Guo-Hua Feng
Dr. Yung-Chou Kao
Prof. Dr. Federico Carpi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • haptic actuator
  • feedback
  • augmented reality
  • virtual reality
  • smart manufacturing
  • robot

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 12415 KiB  
Article
EEG Investigation on the Tactile Perceptual Performance of a Pneumatic Wearable Display of Softness
by Federico Carpi, Michele C. Valles, Gabriele Frediani, Tanita Toci and Antonello Grippo
Actuators 2023, 12(12), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/act12120431 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1367
Abstract
Multisensory human–machine interfaces for virtual- or augmented-reality systems are lacking wearable actuated devices that can provide users with tactile feedback on the softness of virtual objects. They are needed for a variety of uses, such as medical simulators, tele-operation systems and tele-presence environments. [...] Read more.
Multisensory human–machine interfaces for virtual- or augmented-reality systems are lacking wearable actuated devices that can provide users with tactile feedback on the softness of virtual objects. They are needed for a variety of uses, such as medical simulators, tele-operation systems and tele-presence environments. Such interfaces require actuators that can generate proper tactile feedback, by stimulating the fingertips via quasi-static (non-vibratory) forces, delivered through a deformable surface, so as to control both the contact area and the indentation depth. The actuators should combine a compact and lightweight structure with ease and safety of use, as well as low costs. Among the few actuation technologies that can comply with such requirements, pneumatic driving appears to be one of the most promising. Here, we present an investigation on a new type of pneumatic wearable tactile displays of softness, recently described by our group, which consist of small inflatable chambers arranged at the fingertips. In order to objectively assess the perceptual response that they can elicit, a systematic electroencephalographic study was conducted on ten healthy subjects. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded from eight sites above the somatosensory cortex (Fc2, Fc4, C2 and C4, and Fc1, Fc3, C1 and C3), in response to nine conditions of tactile stimulation delivered by the displays: stimulation of either only the thumb, the thumb and index finger simultaneously, or the thumb, index and middle finger simultaneously, each repeated at tactile pressures of 10, 20 and 30 kPa. An analysis of the latency and amplitude of the six components of SEP signals that typically characterise tactile sensing (P50, N100, P200, N300, P300 and N450) showed that this wearable pneumatic device is able to elicit predictable perceptual responses, consistent with the stimulation conditions. This proved that the device is capable of adequate actuation performance, which enables adequate tactile perceptual performance. Moreover, this shows that SEPs may effectively be used with this technology in the future, to assess variable perceptual experiences (especially with combinations of visual and tactile stimuli), in objective terms, complementing subjective information gathered from psychophysical tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Actuators for Haptic Feedback Applications)
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29 pages, 12038 KiB  
Article
Linear Resonator Actuator-Constructed Wearable Haptic System with the Application of Converting Remote Grinding Force to Vibratory Sensation
by Shang-Hsien Liu, Yung-Chou Kao and Guo-Hua Feng
Actuators 2023, 12(9), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/act12090359 - 14 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
This study developed a three-axis vibrational haptic wearable device (RCWS) utilizing Linear Resonant Actuators (LRAs) to simulate grinding vibrations. The implementation of RCWS is described in detail. By recording the normal force during manual grinding with a load cell and converting it into [...] Read more.
This study developed a three-axis vibrational haptic wearable device (RCWS) utilizing Linear Resonant Actuators (LRAs) to simulate grinding vibrations. The implementation of RCWS is described in detail. By recording the normal force during manual grinding with a load cell and converting it into a series of PWM commands, the LRA on the RCWS was controlled in open-loop mode using these PWM commands. Three methods were tested for force-to-PWM conversion, two of which showed a linear correlation (>0.7) with raw data. In the correlation between PWM commands and generated acceleration, all three methods exhibited a high linearity of at least 0.85. This wearable RCWS offers a promising approach for users to experience the machining force from the versatile and critical remote machining process with a finger vibratory sensation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Actuators for Haptic Feedback Applications)
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20 pages, 3837 KiB  
Article
Design and Research of Multimodal Fusion Feedback Device Based on Virtual Interactive System
by Zhen Zhang, Kenan Shi, Pan Ge, Taisheng Zhang, Manman Xu and Yu Chen
Actuators 2023, 12(8), 331; https://doi.org/10.3390/act12080331 - 16 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1240
Abstract
This paper proposes a kinesthetic–tactile fusion feedback system based on virtual interaction. Combining the results of human fingertip deformation characteristics analysis and an upper limb motion mechanism, a fingertip tactile feedback device and an arm kinesthetic feedback device are designed and analyzed for [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a kinesthetic–tactile fusion feedback system based on virtual interaction. Combining the results of human fingertip deformation characteristics analysis and an upper limb motion mechanism, a fingertip tactile feedback device and an arm kinesthetic feedback device are designed and analyzed for blind instructors. In order to verify the effectiveness of the method, virtual touch experiments are established through the mapping relationship between the master–slave and virtual end. The results showed that the average recognition rate of virtual objects is 79.58%, and the recognition speed is improved by 41.9% compared with the one without force feedback, indicating that the kinesthetic–tactile feedback device can provide more haptic perception information in virtual feedback and improve the recognition rate of haptic perception. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Actuators for Haptic Feedback Applications)
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18 pages, 7399 KiB  
Article
Transparent Localized Haptics: Utilization of PVDF Actuators on Touch Displays
by Enes Selman Ege and Abdulkadir Balikci
Actuators 2023, 12(7), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/act12070289 - 16 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1369
Abstract
Generating localized haptic feedback on touch displays has been a challenge in recent years. In this study, we introduce a haptic interface using transparent thin-film PVDF actuators to address this issue. The transparency feature can be used to mount the actuators at any [...] Read more.
Generating localized haptic feedback on touch displays has been a challenge in recent years. In this study, we introduce a haptic interface using transparent thin-film PVDF actuators to address this issue. The transparency feature can be used to mount the actuators at any location beneath the display, enabling localized haptic feedback as the generated vibration is primarily evident on the mounting area. Two different configurations are designed, simulated and prepared to explore the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The first configuration is used to characterize the haptic interface. Modal and forced-vibration analyses are performed to identify important design characteristics based on human factors. Subsequent 2AFC psychophysics experiments validate the characteristics. In the second configuration, eight actuators are attached to the touch surface in a 2 × 4 matrix formation and excited at different voltage amplitudes. Human experiments are conducted based on the results from corresponding forced-vibration analysis. The results show that subjects demonstrate an accuracy of 96% in identifying locations with haptic feedback when the actuators are excited with 232 Vpp. Overall, our study demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed transparent haptic interface equipped with PVDF actuators in achieving localized haptic feedback on touch displays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Actuators for Haptic Feedback Applications)
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