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Future, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2024) – 3 articles

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16 pages, 722 KiB  
Article
Dialogues with AI: Comparing ChatGPT, Bard, and Human Participants’ Responses in In-Depth Interviews on Adolescent Health Care
by Jelle Fostier, Elena Leemans, Lien Meeussen, Alix Wulleman, Shauni Van Doren, David De Coninck and Jaan Toelen
Future 2024, 2(1), 30-45; https://doi.org/10.3390/future2010003 - 11 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This study explores the feasibility of large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT and Bard as virtual participants in health-related research interviews. The goal is to assess whether these models can function as a “collective knowledge platform” by processing extensive datasets. Framed as a [...] Read more.
This study explores the feasibility of large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT and Bard as virtual participants in health-related research interviews. The goal is to assess whether these models can function as a “collective knowledge platform” by processing extensive datasets. Framed as a “proof of concept”, the research involved 20 interviews with both ChatGPT and Bard, portraying personas based on parents of adolescents. The interviews focused on physician–patient–parent confidentiality issues across fictional cases covering alcohol intoxication, STDs, ultrasound without parental knowledge, and mental health. Conducted in Dutch, the interviews underwent independent coding and comparison with human responses. The analysis identified four primary themes—privacy, trust, responsibility, and etiology—from both AI models and human-based interviews. While the main concepts aligned, nuanced differences in emphasis and interpretation were observed. Bard exhibited less interpersonal variation compared to ChatGPT and human respondents. Notably, AI personas prioritized privacy and age more than human parents. Recognizing disparities between AI and human interviews, researchers must adapt methodologies and refine AI models for improved accuracy and consistency. This research initiates discussions on the evolving role of generative AI in research, opening avenues for further exploration. Full article
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14 pages, 1005 KiB  
Article
Association between Body Composition, Physical Activity Profile, and Occurrence of Knee and Foot Postural Alterations among Young Healthy Adults
by Sadaf Ashraf, Roberto Viveiros, Cíntia França, Rui Trindade Ornelas and Ana Rodrigues
Future 2024, 2(1), 16-29; https://doi.org/10.3390/future2010002 - 25 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Knee and foot deformities refer to structural abnormalities in the knee and foot bones, joints, ligaments, or muscles. Various factors, including genetics, injury, disease, or excessive use, can cause these deformities. These musculoskeletal conditions can significantly impact individuals’ quality of life. This study [...] Read more.
Knee and foot deformities refer to structural abnormalities in the knee and foot bones, joints, ligaments, or muscles. Various factors, including genetics, injury, disease, or excessive use, can cause these deformities. These musculoskeletal conditions can significantly impact individuals’ quality of life. This study examined foot and knee deformities in 231 young healthy adults (165 men, 66 women) aged 22.6 ± 4.9 years and their association with physical activity and body composition. The postural assessment was performed by two Physiotherapists, with the subject standing in three views: side, anterior, and posterior. Physical activity (Baecke’s Habitual Physical Activity Questionnaire) and body composition (InBody 770) were assessed. Results showed that the most common foot deformity was pes planus, while the genu recurvatum was the most common knee deformity among the individuals. Physical activity level was negatively associated with knee and foot deformities. Conversely, body composition differed with the presence of genu recurvatum. These findings present a starting point to understand the occurrence of knee and foot postural alterations according to the individuals’ body composition and physical activity profiles, which could support the deployment of tailored interventions among healthy adults. In addition, early detection of postural changes is crucial in mitigating their negative long-term impact on physical well-being. Full article
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15 pages, 305 KiB  
Article
Are Rural–Urban Differences in Bullying and Poly-Bullying Victimization Associated with Internet Addiction or Depressive Symptoms among Adolescents in Jiangsu Province of China
by Feng Huang, Yan Wang, Hui Xue, Xiyan Zhang, Yong Tian, Wei Du, Lijun Fan and Jie Yang
Future 2024, 2(1), 1-15; https://doi.org/10.3390/future2010001 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 837
Abstract
Background: School bullying is a global problem. Although previous studies showed rural adolescents were at higher risk of being bullied compared to their urban counterparts, the rural–urban differences in the risk of bullying or poly-bullying victimization in relation with different characteristics and the [...] Read more.
Background: School bullying is a global problem. Although previous studies showed rural adolescents were at higher risk of being bullied compared to their urban counterparts, the rural–urban differences in the risk of bullying or poly-bullying victimization in relation with different characteristics and the joint association of internet addiction and depressive symptoms with the observed urban–rural disparities are unclear. Objective: We aim to investigate the rural–urban differences in bullying or poly-bullying victimization among adolescents and whether the observed rural–urban differences are associated specifically with internet addiction or depression. Methods: This cross-sectional study considered a total of 25,377 Grade 7 to 12 adolescents from the ‘Surveillance for Common Disease and Health Risk Factors among Students’ project implemented in Jiangsu Province in 2019. Rurality of residence was ascertained via the Regulation of Statistical Classification. We used Poisson regression to estimate the age–sex adjusted rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for bullying and poly-bullying victimization. Results: Approximately 20.26% (95%CI: 16.11–25.47%) and 7.67% (5.48–10.74%) rural adolescents experienced bullying and poly-bullying, in comparison with 16.50% (12.65–21.52%) and 5.81% (4.34–7.78%) urban adolescents, respectively. Rural adolescents had 14% and 23% higher rates of bullying victimization (RR: 1.14, 95%CI: 1.03–1.26) and poly-victimization (RR: 1.23, 95%CI: 1.05–1.44) than their urban counterparts. When further controlled for internet addiction, the observed rural–urban disparities increased among adolescents with depressive symptoms, whereas diminished among those without depressive symptoms. Full article
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