Methods on Sport Biomechanics

A special issue of Methods and Protocols (ISSN 2409-9279).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2024 | Viewed by 810

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Pôle Parasport Santé, CHU Raymond Poincaré, APHP, 92380 Garches, France
2. ISPC Synergies, 75008 Paris, France
3. UMR 1179 END-ICAP, UVSQ, 78000 Versailles, France
Interests: biomechanics; sport biomechanics; gait; sports injuries; biomedical engineering; sports medicine; 3D motion analysis; movement analysis; kinematic

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Guest Editor
EA 7370 Laboratoire SEP, INSEP, 75012 Paris, France
Interests: physiology; sport biomechanics; sports injuries; sports medicine; sport engineering; movement analysis; kinematic; sprint
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Service de Médecine Physique et Réadapatation Locomotrice et Respiratoire, CHU Nantes, 44093 Nantes, France
2. Movement-Interactions-Performance (MIP), EA 4334, CHU Nantes, Nantes Université, 44000 Nantes, France
3. School of Health & Society, The University of Salford, Salford M6 6PU, UK
Interests: biomechanics; sport biomechanics; gait; biomedical engineering; sports medicine; 3D motion analysis; movement analysis; kinematic

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the field of competitive or recreational sport, innovation is often the result of research in the fields of biomechanics and physiology. In research, innovating requires sharing our successes and failures so that each of us can realize our ideas. For this, sharing knowledge of evaluation protocols and quantification methods is essential.

In biomechanics applied to sport, there are many areas where there is still no consensus. We hope that this Special Issue will be a space where you can express your research that may be consensus proposals but also be in agreement or not with the already existing consensus. This Olympic and Paralympic year has allowed numerous teams in the field of engineering and sport to support athletes and sports staff. Other teams were also able to take advantage of this Olympic and Paralympic spotlight to work on leisure sport issues. We have no doubt that your work can allow many teams to save time through the choices and non-choices you have made.

This Special Issue will focus on methods and protocols applied to the field of competitive and leisure sport using biomechanical approaches.

Dr. Didier Pradon
Dr. Jean Slawinski
Dr. Fabien Leboeuf
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Methods and Protocols is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sports
  • biomechanics
  • methods

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 943 KiB  
Article
Pole Dancing-Specific Muscle Strength: Development and Reliability of a Novel Assessment Protocol
by Despoina Ignatoglou, Achilleas Paliouras, Eleftherios Paraskevopoulos, Nikolaos Strimpakos, Paraskevi Bilika, Maria Papandreou and Eleni Kapreli
Methods Protoc. 2024, 7(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/mps7030044 - 18 May 2024
Viewed by 469
Abstract
Background: Pole dancing is a physically demanding sport that combines dance and acrobatic movements on a vertical pole. Despite its highly growing popularity, there is currently limited research in the field. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a strength [...] Read more.
Background: Pole dancing is a physically demanding sport that combines dance and acrobatic movements on a vertical pole. Despite its highly growing popularity, there is currently limited research in the field. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a strength assessment protocol for athletes in pole dancing, with a specific focus on functional positions on the pole. Methods: Thirty-two female pole dancing athletes participated in this study. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) were measured at three different sport-specific positions on the pole (shoulder abduction and adduction, and hip adduction), on two separate days (test and re-test) with a five to seven day interval between them. A hand-held dynamometer (Activ5- Activbody) stabilized on the pole was used for this study. Results: The intra-session reliability was good to excellent for all sports-specific positions and for both sides of the body, across all different movements (ICC = 0.837–0.960, SEM = 5.02Kg-2.24Kg, and SDD = 27.46%-14.92%). Slightly better results were found regarding inter-session reliability (ICC = 0.927–0.970, SEM = 3.72Kg-1.97Kg, and SDD = 22.86%-15.19%). There was not a statistically significant difference between the MVICs between the left and right or dominant and non-dominant side in shoulder abduction (p = 0.105) and hip adduction (p = 0.282), in contrast to shoulder adduction (p = 0.00). Conclusion: The strength assessment protocol developed in the current study has proven to be a reliable and functional tool, with the potential for utilization in clinical practice as part of objective strength testing. Further studies are needed in order to expand the protocol to other muscle groups and positions and to generalize the results in all pole dancing populations such as male athletes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methods on Sport Biomechanics)
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