Porous Materials and Their Adsorption Behaviors

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 673

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Functional Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology (Shenzhen), Harbin 150001, China
Interests: metal-organic frameworks for gas adsorption, catalysis, and sensing; well-defined catalysts for organic synthesis; functional polymer synthesis

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry and Functional Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology (Shenzhen), Harbin 150001, China
Interests: metal-organic frameworks; organometallics; hydrogen production materials; enzyme biomimetic; toxics adsorption

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Porous materials are a class of functional–structural materials with multi-hole structures. Due to their great porosity, they are used in various applications, such as the recognition of guest analytes, catalysis, gas or solid adsorption, and chemical sensors, showing great potential in environmental remediation and energy generation. The variety of categories of porous materials include metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic frameworks (COFs), porous ceramics, porous organic materials etc. Because of the porous sites, high thermal and kinetic stabilities, and optimal index of physical and mechanical properties, porous materials usually have great adsorption behaviors. In the past two decades, substantial efforts have been made in design, fabrication, and application of porous materials. However, there are still a lot of problems and challenges. For example, how can we maintain the specific accessibility of these pores? It is known that some porous adsorbents suddenly become highly accessible and lose selectivity for specific guest molecules above a threshold pressure or temperature. In addition, can the pore size in porous materials be tuned? If this is possible, what kind of techniques can be used?  Furthermore, in specific porous materials, such as MOFs, what metal centre or special ligand could aid in their adsorption behaviors? To answer these questions and to develop better adsorbents or sensors, the present Special Issue on “Porous Materials and Their Adsorption Behaviors” could be represent a timely intervention compiling the recent progress and achievements in this field.

Dr. Peng Ren
Dr. Xuemei Yang
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • porous materials
  • adsorption
  • synthesis of novel complexes/materials for adsorption
  • metal-organic frameworks
  • covalent organic frameworks
  • chemical sensors
  • X-ray diffraction
  • optical properties

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 3689 KiB  
Article
Heat Treatment of Calcite to Enhance Its Removal of Color Dye Alizarin Red S
by Zhaohui Li, Anna Bowman, Angie Rayniak, Jadyn Strommen, Lori Allen and Shangping Xu
Crystals 2024, 14(5), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14050450 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 379
Abstract
The use of color dyes in modern society presents a great challenge to the environment. Thus, extensive studies have been conducted in the last 30 years on the removal of color dyes from aqueous solutions such industrial wastewater. In this study, the removal [...] Read more.
The use of color dyes in modern society presents a great challenge to the environment. Thus, extensive studies have been conducted in the last 30 years on the removal of color dyes from aqueous solutions such industrial wastewater. In this study, the removal of alizarin red S (ARS), an anionic dye, from solution by raw calcite (Cal) and heat-treated calcite (HCal) was conducted and compared under different physico-chemical conditions. Based on the isotherm study, the ARS removal capacities increased from 167 to 251 mmol/kg after the Cal was heated to 1000 °C for 3 h. The X-ray diffraction analyses showed no difference in the calcite phase between Cal and HCal after ARS sorption. Fourier-transform infrared results also showed no change in the calcite phase after ARS sorption, except a slightly increase in wavenumber from 713 to 727 cm−1 for the OCO bending of HCal at high ARS sorption levels. SEM observations showed about the same particle size and morphology before and after ARS sorption. The TGA data showed the formation of CaO after Cal was heated, and CaO converted back into calcite after being in contact with water or ARS solution for 24 h and then being air-dried. Thus, the high ARS removal could be due to CaO produced after Cal being heated. The findings from this research proved that there is great potential in the use of calcite, a low-cost and readily available Earth material, after heat treatment for the removal of contaminants from water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Porous Materials and Their Adsorption Behaviors)
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