Quality and Clinical Outcomes Improvement in the Management of Oncology Patients

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Survivorship and Quality of Life".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2024 | Viewed by 1980

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The art and science of the analysis and quality improvement of clinical outcomes in the management of oncology patients, along with patient safety, continue to evolve at an increasingly rapid pace. In fact, over the years, novel concepts have arisen (risk stratification, shared decision making, interdisciplinary meetings, prehabilitation, etc.), new initiatives have taken shape (e.g., state/nation-wide or international clinical databases), and new innovative treatments have emerged. In order to care for our patients, raise the standards of healthcare services, and be successful in today’s and tomorrow’s rapidly changing healthcare environment, understanding and advancing these fields represents an essential duty of all oncologists, surgeons, physicians, and professionals related to oncology patients.

In this context, we call oncologists, surgeons, physicians, and professionals from all disciplines involved in the perioperative pathway of oncology patients (oncologists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, radiologists, intensivists, cardiologists, pulmonologists, nurses, physiotherapists, nutritionists, etc.) to contribute to this Special Issue. Our vision is to provide the best currently available evidence on this crucial topic, thus providing all the necessary information to clinicians regarding core concepts in the management of oncology patients.

Dr. Dimitrios E. Magouliotis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oncology
  • surgical oncology
  • quality improvement
  • clinical outcomes
  • patient safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1676 KiB  
Article
What Is a Sarcoma ‘Specialist Center’? Multidisciplinary Research Finds an Answer
by Roger Wilson, Denise Reinke, Gerard van Oortmerssen, Ornella Gonzato, Gabriele Ott, Chandrajit P. Raut, B. Ashleigh Guadagnolo, Rick L. M. Haas, Jonathan Trent, Robin Jones, Lauren Pretorius, Brandi Felser, Mandy Basson, Kathrin Schuster and Bernd Kasper
Cancers 2024, 16(10), 1857; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16101857 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 809
Abstract
The management of sarcomas in specialist centers delivers significant benefits. In much of the world, specialists are not available, and the development of expertise is identified as a major need. However, the terms ‘specialist’ or ‘expert’ center are rarely defined. Our objective is [...] Read more.
The management of sarcomas in specialist centers delivers significant benefits. In much of the world, specialists are not available, and the development of expertise is identified as a major need. However, the terms ‘specialist’ or ‘expert’ center are rarely defined. Our objective is to offer a definition for patient advocates and a tool for healthcare providers to underpin improving the care of people with sarcoma. SPAGN developed a discussion paper for a workshop at the SPAGN 2023 Conference, attended by 75 delegates. A presentation to the Connective Tissue Oncology Society (CTOS) and further discussion led to this paper. Core Principles were identified that underlie specialist sarcoma care. The primary Principle is the multi-disciplinary team discussing every patient, at first diagnosis and during treatment. Principles for optimal sarcoma management include accurate diagnosis followed by safe, high-quality treatment, with curative intent. These Principles are supplemented by Features describing areas of healthcare, professional involvement, and service provision and identifying further research and development needs. These allow for variations because of national or local policies and budgets. We propose the term ‘Sarcoma Intelligent Specialist Network’ to recognize expertise wherever it is found in the world. This provides a base for further discussion and local refinement. Full article
10 pages, 917 KiB  
Article
Improving Breast Cancer Outcomes for Indigenous Women in Australia
by Vita Christie, Lynette Riley, Deb Green, Janaki Amin, John Skinner, Chris Pyke and Kylie Gwynne
Cancers 2024, 16(9), 1736; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16091736 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 609
Abstract
In Australia, the incidence rate of breast cancer is lower in Indigenous* women than non-Indigenous women; however, the mortality rate is higher, with Indigenous women 1.2 times more likely to die from the disease. This paper provides practical and achievable solutions to improve [...] Read more.
In Australia, the incidence rate of breast cancer is lower in Indigenous* women than non-Indigenous women; however, the mortality rate is higher, with Indigenous women 1.2 times more likely to die from the disease. This paper provides practical and achievable solutions to improve health outcomes for Indigenous women with breast cancer in Australia. This research employed the Context–Mechanism–Outcome (CMO) framework to reveal potential mechanisms and contextual factors that influence breast cancer outcomes for Indigenous women, stratified into multiple levels, namely, micro (interpersonal), meso (systemic) and macro (policy) levels. The CMO framework allowed us to interpret evidence regarding Indigenous women and breast cancer and provides nine practical ways to improve health outcomes and survival rates. Full article
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