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Adm. Sci., Volume 4, Issue 4 (December 2014) – 2 articles , Pages 400-432

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Article
Governance in the Arts and Culture Nonprofit Sector: Vigilance or Indifference?
by Johanne Turbide and Claude Laurin
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(4), 413-432; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci4040413 - 13 Nov 2014
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 9631
Abstract
In this article we attempt to contribute to governance research in the nonprofit area by proposing a conceptual framework inspired by recent developments in the literature. First, we analyze the governance of nonprofit organizations (hereafter, NPOs) from different theoretical perspectives, inspired by for-profit, [...] Read more.
In this article we attempt to contribute to governance research in the nonprofit area by proposing a conceptual framework inspired by recent developments in the literature. First, we analyze the governance of nonprofit organizations (hereafter, NPOs) from different theoretical perspectives, inspired by for-profit, nonprofit and public sector theories on governance. After presenting a governance framework for NPOs, we explore empirically whether its various dimensions are being taken into account by NPOs in the arts and culture sector. Our findings suggest that, among NPOs in this sector, governance is still viewed as a narrow concept where board members are mainly passive, basically rubber-stamping decisions for the benefit of external funders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)
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Article
Extending the Individual Level of Virtuality: Implications of Task Virtuality in Virtual and Traditional Settings
by Mehmet A. Orhan
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(4), 400-412; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci4040400 - 9 Oct 2014
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 8039
Abstract
Virtuality in organizations has usually been treated as a characteristic that is observed either at a team or organizational level. However, the penetration of new technologies into our lives has transformed the entire design of organizations and teams. Not only has the design [...] Read more.
Virtuality in organizations has usually been treated as a characteristic that is observed either at a team or organizational level. However, the penetration of new technologies into our lives has transformed the entire design of organizations and teams. Not only has the design of teams and organizations changed, but the context and design of our jobs have also been impacted. Today, even employees in traditional team settings use electronic communication tools to work with multiple dispersed contacts outside of their teams and organizations, such as colleagues, clients or suppliers, who do not share the same geographical location. With all of these changes, virtuality can no longer be considered as a concept that is exclusive to virtual team members. In today’s organizations, to some extent, everyone’s tasks involve non-face-to-face contacts, irrespective of team virtuality. It therefore becomes crucial to identify the task virtuality phenomenon in organizations. With this paper, the example of Yahoo! is used as a case study to illustrate how task virtuality can be relevant for the design of organizations. Additionally, the proposed two-dimensional framework integrates both team virtuality and task virtuality elements in organizations. This framework is novel in that it not only allows us how to conceptualize the task virtuality, but also provides practical guidance for managers to identify and understand the factors leading to high task virtuality and to deal with the resulting complexities. Full article
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