Topic Editors

Department of Heritage, Architecture, Urban Planning, Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria, Via dell’Università, 25, 89124 Reggio Calabria, Italy
Prof. Dr. Paola Pellegrini
Department of Urban Planning and Design, Xi’an Jiaotong - Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123, China
Department of Information Engineering, Infrastructure and Sustainable Energy (DIIES), University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, 89122 Reggio Calabria, Italy
Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Padova, Piazza Capitaniato 7, 35139 Padova, Italy
Dr. Angela Viglianisi
Urban Architecture Heritage Department, Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria, Via dell’Università, 89124 Reggio Calabria, Italy

Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning

Abstract submission deadline
closed (28 February 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 April 2023)
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the current international debate, real estate, cultural, and landscape assets represent a key element of the identity, uniqueness, and sustainable development of cities and regions.

It is also known that the quality of heritage is recognized as an advantage for urban and territorial regeneration, capable of bringing various multidimensional benefits (not only economic), since it can contribute to the identity of the territories and the cultural diversity of local communities, to the well-being and people’s health, as well as the creation of jobs, environmental and social regeneration, and the attractiveness of places.

However, activities related to the conservation and enhancement of heritage often require large investments, in the face of scarce resources and high investment uncertainties. To this end, it is increasingly necessary to identify and implement new urban and territorial development models and strategies to face the challenges of sustainable development, linked to the sustainable use of resources, based on research and innovation, a dynamic way to stimulate conservation, the development, renewal, and transmission to future generations of these essential resources for development. It is also important to consider how digital transformation affects these issues and leads to new visions and innovative approaches for sustainability. These approaches are increasingly based on the use of digital tools aimed at strengthening the participation, sharing of information, and, above all, making heritage inclusive and accessible to all.

Potential key research topics include applications that discuss (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Appraisal and Evaluation: the role of adequate frameworks for evaluation and development of methodologies which, by addressing the complexity of the interests at stake, allow for evaluating the sustainability of programs and projects for the enhancement of heritage.
  • Digital Transformation for Innovation and Information sharing: innovative models for the enhancement of heritage and facilitating the accessibility of information through digital tools, such as social networks, data visualization, and analysis platforms; augmented reality; the blockchain; the metaverse; and digital communication.
  • The City Planning Tools and the Conservation, Redevelopment, and Enhancement of the Urban Landscape and its Cultural Heritage: What role and what relationship is there today between space planning and conservation? How have planning tools evolved to evaluate heritage and include digital transformation? What innovations are needed in planning to obtain enhancement processes?

Prof. Dr. Lucia Della Spina
Prof. Dr. Paola Pellegrini
Dr. Antonia Russo
Prof. Dr. Maria Rosa Valluzzi
Dr. Angela Viglianisi
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • appraisal and evaluation: multi-dimensional evaluation, integrated assessment, integrated spatial assessment, adaptive decision-making process, circular economy principles, community-led processes, social innovation, innovative management, urban real estate values, investment risk;
  • digital transformation for innovation and information sharing: digital transformation, information sharing, information accessibility, social networks, data analysis, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, blockchain, metaverse, digital communication, social media;
  • conservation, redevelopment and enhancement of the urban landscape: built heritage, landscape conservation, priority of intervention, urban regeneration and valorization, urban heritage, densification and sustainability

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400
Heritage
heritage
1.7 2.8 2018 16.9 Days CHF 1600
Urban Science
urbansci
2.0 4.5 2017 23.7 Days CHF 1600
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600
Land
land
3.9 3.7 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600
Information
information
3.1 5.8 2010 18 Days CHF 1600
Applied Sciences
applsci
2.7 4.5 2011 16.9 Days CHF 2400

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Published Papers (30 papers)

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30 pages, 1585 KiB  
Article
A Prefeasibility Study for the Adaptive Reuse of Cultural Historical Landscapes as Drivers and Enablers of Sustainable Development
by Lucia Della Spina
Sustainability 2023, 15(15), 12019; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151512019 - 04 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1317
Abstract
The international scientific debate on the growing concern over land consumption has gained prominence in recent years. The awareness of the link between cultural heritage and sustainable development has become increasingly evident, leading to a greater focus on the Adaptive Reuse (AR) of [...] Read more.
The international scientific debate on the growing concern over land consumption has gained prominence in recent years. The awareness of the link between cultural heritage and sustainable development has become increasingly evident, leading to a greater focus on the Adaptive Reuse (AR) of cultural assets as a conscious process of creating new values. This trend has prompted a reflection on urban planning practices and the promotion of AR and valorization policies for heritage, which can contribute to environmental sustainability, social cohesion, and cultural identity, thereby providing fertile ground for innovation and local economic development. However, decisions regarding AR interventions pose significant complexity due to the multiple interests at stake, as well as high costs that discourage investiments. For these reasons, this paper proposes a multi-methodological approach—applied to a project for the AR of a cluster of mountain huts located in the Sila National Park (SNP)—aimed at effectively supporting decisions related to the evaluation of feasibility and economic sustainability of cultural heritage landscapes that have not yet been adequately valorized. This approach was applied to a pilot project of AR, allowing for the discussion of the proposed evaluation methodological framework. The final step involved verifying the economic feasibility and financial sustainability of the methodology based on a Financial Feasibility Plan (FFP) of the proposed of the new destination to ‘Rifugio Diffuso’ (RD). The assessment aimed to evaluate the intervention’s ability to create value, generate a level of profitability that meets private investment expectations, and promote sustainable development of the local economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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23 pages, 7463 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Passive Strategies in Traditional Vernacular Architecture
by Pedro Moscoso-García and Felipe Quesada-Molina
Buildings 2023, 13(8), 1984; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13081984 - 03 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2726
Abstract
Vernacular architecture constitutes a rich source of information and ancestral knowledge and could become a key resource for sustainable development. Its passive design strategies effectively respond to local climatic and weather conditions, using locally sourced materials for the construction of its supporting structures [...] Read more.
Vernacular architecture constitutes a rich source of information and ancestral knowledge and could become a key resource for sustainable development. Its passive design strategies effectively respond to local climatic and weather conditions, using locally sourced materials for the construction of its supporting structures and enveloping elements, as well as spatial organization and the incorporation of a buffer area (courtyard) that optimize the use of renewable resources. This qualitative study analyzes a traditional housing typology with a central courtyard located in the Historic Center of Azogues, Ecuador. In situ monitoring was conducted to evaluate the case study’s interior thermal comfort in different building spaces. Using the open-source software Open Studio and EnergyPlus, a simulation model was built to assess the annual thermal performance of the house. Field records were used to verify the effectiveness of the strategies that responded to the location’s climatic conditions. The analysis of the passive strategies used in the selected house included natural ventilation, solar protection, and thermal insulation, which depended on various aspects of the building, such as its location, the internal space’s arrangement, and the design of openings (doors and windows), among others. The thermal simulations revealed that the traditional house located in the Historic Center of Azogues was well adapted to the local climate, although the interior thermal comfort was not entirely satisfactory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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29 pages, 26520 KiB  
Article
The Rise and Evolution of Wind Tower Designs in Egypt and the Middle East
by Marian A. Nessim, Aya Elshabshiri, Virginia Bassily, Niriman Soliman, Khaled Tarabieh and Sherif Goubran
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 10881; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151410881 - 11 Jul 2023
Viewed by 2665
Abstract
Throughout history, vernacular architecture has sought to provide inhabitants with comfort, using local materials and techniques while drawing inspiration from the local culture. This goal has helped natural and passive environmental building techniques to emerge, evolve, and develop. Even though we are increasingly [...] Read more.
Throughout history, vernacular architecture has sought to provide inhabitants with comfort, using local materials and techniques while drawing inspiration from the local culture. This goal has helped natural and passive environmental building techniques to emerge, evolve, and develop. Even though we are increasingly dependent on mechanical ventilation and cooling solutions, passive techniques are in favor due to global climate challenges and the drive toward sustainable construction. One of the most well-known passive cooling techniques is the windcatcher, or wind tower, as it is known in the Middle East (also known as a malqaf in Egypt). Windcatchers, which appeared in Egypt during the Pharaonic era, were also present in other vernacular Middle Eastern countries such as Iran and Iraq, and they differed in design and materials. This research aims to extract, analyze, and compare windcatchers throughout historical eras in Egypt and other Middle Eastern countries across three main eras: ancient, medieval, and modern. This study thus provides a timeline for developing these passive cooling systems, demonstrating how they were integrated into architecture over millennia. This study also investigates the design differences in these vernacular models, including their shapes, number of sides, and orientation, and correlates them to climatic and architectural conditions. The results highlight that the vernacular wind towers corresponded to the prevailing wind directions and the ventilation needs of the connected spaces. Furthermore, the findings question the effectiveness and appropriateness of some of the modern incorporations of wind towers, which borrow their design from local precedents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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20 pages, 28870 KiB  
Article
Commercial Culture as a Key Impetus in Shaping and Transforming Urban Structure: Case Study of Hangzhou, China
by Kang Cao, Wenbo Xie, Jin Zhu and Fang Wei
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 10620; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151310620 - 05 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1105
Abstract
Although the forces or impetuses that influence an urban structure are diverse, as has been fully studied by scholars from diverse research fields, some have played key roles. We endeavor to explore the key forces and mechanisms forming and transforming the urban spatial [...] Read more.
Although the forces or impetuses that influence an urban structure are diverse, as has been fully studied by scholars from diverse research fields, some have played key roles. We endeavor to explore the key forces and mechanisms forming and transforming the urban spatial structure through Hangzhou, a multi-identity city. Upon studying classical ancient texts, historical maps, critical and recent literature, and POI data, we argue that the first and foremost driver of Hangzhou is commercial culture, rather than any other factors. Under a diachronic view and with graphic analysis, we distinguished Hangzhou’s three major transformations during the last 900 years. Each transformation was, respectively, driven by the complicated commercial culture, which was mixed up with other elementary cultures, such as civil, leisure, landscape, and industrial. Furthermore, urban heritages were formed, inherited, revitalized, and reutilized during the transformation processes, which, in turn, enriched the commercial culture and vividly reshaped Hangzhou’s urban structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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31 pages, 11615 KiB  
Article
Acoustic Tomography as a Supporting Tool in the Sustainable Management of Historic Greenery: Example of the Church Garden in Horostyta (Poland)
by Margot Dudkiewicz and Wojciech Durlak
Sustainability 2023, 15(11), 8654; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15118654 - 26 May 2023
Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Senile trees in historic church gardens have natural, aesthetic, historical, and cultural value. Cutting them down too hastily annihilates the achievements of entire generations. We should try to preserve the greenery surrounding historic churches and integrate it into a clear compositional arrangement with [...] Read more.
Senile trees in historic church gardens have natural, aesthetic, historical, and cultural value. Cutting them down too hastily annihilates the achievements of entire generations. We should try to preserve the greenery surrounding historic churches and integrate it into a clear compositional arrangement with the sacral architecture. The primary purpose of the paper was to describe the process of inventorying 200-year-old trees and to present the revalorization project for the garden around the historic Orthodox church in Horostyta, located in the Lublin Voivodeship, in southeastern Poland. The church complex consists of a wooden 18th-century building, bell tower, garden, and cemetery. Within the church garden’s boundaries, there are 15 trees, with two predominant species: Acer pseudoplatanus L. and Tilia cordata Mill. These trees are of varying ages and health conditions. We used acoustic tomography to perform tree health diagnostics. Three trees, for which the initial visual assessment was disturbing, were examined thanks to detailed tomography tests. Then, through a project adapting the church garden to the health conditions of the ancient trees, they were separated from users by flowerbeds and no small architectural objects were placed around them. The presented development concept forms a compromise between tradition and the modern user’s needs. In 2007, a general renovation of the temple building was completed. Currently, the presented project for the church garden is being implemented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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29 pages, 11542 KiB  
Article
Ethnicities in Post-Communist Romania: Spatial Dynamics, Fractionalisation, and Polarisation at the NUTS-3 Level
by Marina-Alexandra Rotaru, Remus Creţan and Ana-Neli Ianăş
Land 2023, 12(6), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12061133 - 26 May 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3974
Abstract
Scholars have shown a special interest in discovering and studying the role of ethnic diversity and spatiality at the country and region levels. This study contributes to the theoretical debate on the spatial dynamics of ethnicities, with the aim of (1) determining the [...] Read more.
Scholars have shown a special interest in discovering and studying the role of ethnic diversity and spatiality at the country and region levels. This study contributes to the theoretical debate on the spatial dynamics of ethnicities, with the aim of (1) determining the evolution of ethnic dynamics in post-communist Romania and (2) applying ethnic fractionalisation and polarisation indices. The study uses a mixed methods approach based on a descriptive statistics analysis and applies the fractionalisation and polarisation indices to Romania’s NUTS-3 (i.e., county) level. The findings suggest that the ethnic spatial dynamics in post-communist Romania have shown a decrease in all ethnicities due to migration and low birth rates, with the exception of the Roma ethnicity, for whom the trend is increasing. Additionally, polarisation and fractionalisation indices have different evolutionary manifestations depending on the dynamics of the ethnic groups present in certain geographical areas. Although neither of the two analysed indices has witnessed profound change at the spatial level, these small changes in spatial and short-term ethnic diversity can help us advance knowledge about co-existence in ethnically diverse societies. Higher values of the two indices are obvious in several counties where ethnic Hungarians cohabitate with Romanians and other ethnicities. This discovery can inform policy-makers to implement more policies for the further peaceful co-existence of Hungarians, Romanians, and other ethnic groups in Transylvania and other western counties in Romania. Furthermore, as the population growth trend for the Roma ethnicity is upward, Romania has to implement proper policies and build better government infrastructure to counter social inequality against the Roma people. This will help curb potential conflicts between the Roma and other ethnic groups at the local level. Finally, as most ethnicities decreased in number in post-communist times, further attention needs to be paid to the erosion of ethnic diversity in Romania because this could have a negative impact on economic development, social trust, and democracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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15 pages, 4914 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Estimation of the Internal Spatio–Temporal Characteristics of Ancient Temple Heritage Space with Space Syntax Models: A Case Study of Daming Temple
by Kai Zhou, Wenting Wu, Xiaoling Dai and Tianjie Li
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1345; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051345 - 21 May 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1426
Abstract
Ancient temple heritage space is a subcategory of integrated spaces with profound religious architecture, culture, and landscape. The temporal and spatial characteristics, spatial layouts, and functionalities of ancient temples are gradually transformed during different periods in their development. However, quantitative topological estimation tools, [...] Read more.
Ancient temple heritage space is a subcategory of integrated spaces with profound religious architecture, culture, and landscape. The temporal and spatial characteristics, spatial layouts, and functionalities of ancient temples are gradually transformed during different periods in their development. However, quantitative topological estimation tools, e.g., space syntax and detailed digital spatial models, have seldom been adopted in related studies on ancient temples. Daming Temple is a typical representative of the revitalization of Buddhism monastic building heritage in China. This research studies the spaces of Daming Temple, Yangzhou City, in three different periods and explores its spatio–temporal characteristics based on two space syntax models, i.e., the angle segment analysis (ASA) model and the visibility map analysis (VGA) model. By multi-step quantitative estimation, changes in the mean depth (MD), mean connectivity, and intelligibility of the temple have been observed. The global spatial structure is thoroughly revealed, which indicates the changes in the ‘temple-residence-garden’ inter-relationship. It is indicated that dynamic spatio–temporal characteristics of the temple have been undergoing changes chronically. Some phenomena are found to be effective in offering reasonable explanations for these changes, i.e., the changes in relationships among spaces, visitors’ pathfinding difficulties, and spatial design techniques. It also found that there are certain correlations between temporal–spatial changes and spatial conservation strategies for building heritages. The case study can provide some valuable references for the conservation, reactivation, and redesign of related historical and cultural building heritage in East Asia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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23 pages, 8101 KiB  
Article
A Bridge with No Name: The Controversial Resignificance of Urban Architectural Heritage from a Gender Perspective in Cuenca (Ecuador)
by María del Cisne Aguirre Ullauri, Paula Francisca Rodas Espinoza and Amanda Paulina García Cordero
Heritage 2023, 6(5), 4411-4433; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage6050233 - 19 May 2023
Viewed by 1652
Abstract
Urban architectural heritage and its social manifestations are immersed in dynamics beyond their origin and conservation vision. Contemporary society reinterprets, reconfigures and resignifies it according to its own logics of empowerment. In this context, this article addresses the case of a bridge in [...] Read more.
Urban architectural heritage and its social manifestations are immersed in dynamics beyond their origin and conservation vision. Contemporary society reinterprets, reconfigures and resignifies it according to its own logics of empowerment. In this context, this article addresses the case of a bridge in the Historic Center of Cuenca (Ecuador) known by the names of Mariano Moreno Bridge, La Escalinata Bridge or Vivas Nos Queremos Bridge. It describes its patrimonial situation in terms of its values and its relationship with gender. Because of its social implications, this study is divided into two parts: a bibliographic analysis of the historical evolution of the monument, followed by a discussion of its heritage status, and the presentation of the design, validation and application of a qualitative tool to determine the values associated with the property. This tool is used in a focus group of actors to analyze the feminist activism developed on the bridge between 2020 and 2022. This research shows how cultural heritage can be known, valued and used from an inclusive perspective and how public space can be subject to processes of resignification. This bridge became a non-place, a forgotten and a meaningless site. However, due to the struggle for the vindication of women’s rights and freedom of expression, it has taken on a new meaning, becoming an integral part of the contemporary collective imaginary, regardless of its uncertain nomenclature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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19 pages, 3655 KiB  
Article
Strategies for Sustainable Urban Renewal: Community-Scale GIS-Based Analysis for Densification Decision Making
by Jinliu Chen, Paola Pellegrini, Zhuo Yang and Haoqi Wang
Sustainability 2023, 15(10), 7901; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15107901 - 11 May 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1671
Abstract
China is gradually shifting towards more sustainable urban development, and the local governments are increasingly promoting social and environmentally sustainable spatial planning practices. This article debates the potential contradiction between the goal of a constantly growing urban population and the limits to the [...] Read more.
China is gradually shifting towards more sustainable urban development, and the local governments are increasingly promoting social and environmentally sustainable spatial planning practices. This article debates the potential contradiction between the goal of a constantly growing urban population and the limits to the consumption of land planned by this new direction of urban development. The analysis focuses on the wealthy city of Suzhou in the Yangtse River Delta region and explores the opportunities for densification of the residential areas as a possible solution for this contradiction, as already tested by some Chinese cases for land use efficiency. The research applies GIS-based spatial analysis and identifies some of the sites that can be efficiently redeveloped in the resettlement communities for their low floor area ratio (FAR) and obsolescent conditions, which do not correspond to the increasingly middle-class status of the residents in the urban region. The article investigates the different options of a densification strategy in the frame of the policies of urban renewal promoted in China in recent years for improving the quality of the built environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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23 pages, 7125 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Adaptive Reuse Potentiality of Industrial Heritage Based on Improved Entropy TOPSIS Method from the Perspective of Urban Regeneration
by Fanlei Meng, Yeqing Zhi and Yuxiang Pang
Sustainability 2023, 15(9), 7735; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15097735 - 08 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1733
Abstract
In recent years, it has become critical to promote urban redevelopment and maximize the potentiality of industrial heritage through adaptive reuse. Research on the assessment of adaptive reuse potentiality helps to make scientific decisions in sustainable development and the strategy for utilizing industrial [...] Read more.
In recent years, it has become critical to promote urban redevelopment and maximize the potentiality of industrial heritage through adaptive reuse. Research on the assessment of adaptive reuse potentiality helps to make scientific decisions in sustainable development and the strategy for utilizing industrial heritage. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the research on the potentiality of buildings or sites. It also constructs a system for the assessment of adaptive reuse potentiality in industrial heritage and describes the characteristics of different dimensions in the indicators of potentiality evaluation. Utilizing the Improved Entropy Technique for Ordering Preferences by Similarity to the Ideal Solution (Improved Entropy TOPSIS), the relative values of the reuse potentiality of each hierarchical evaluation index are calculated, and an adaptive reuse potentiality ranking of various industrial parks is determined. Through the calculation and analysis, it is demonstrated that the application of this quantitative method to the industrial heritage potentiality evaluation system is highly applicable. This paper’s research framework for adaptive reuse potentiality and empirical findings provides targeted recommendations for determining the reuse potentiality and potential hierarchy of industrial heritage, identifying buildings with a high potential for reuse, and developing adaptive reuse strategies to better direct industrial heritage in urban regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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18 pages, 5201 KiB  
Article
Two-Scaled Identification of Landscape Character Types and Areas: A Case Study of the Yunnan–Vietnam Railway (Yunnan Section), China
by Yingxue Wang, Jiaheng Du, Jingxing Kuang, Chunxu Chen, Maobiao Li and Jin Wang
Sustainability 2023, 15(7), 6173; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15076173 - 03 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1657
Abstract
In recent decades, the role of heritage railways has gradually shifted from transportation, economy, and trade to tourism, culture, and ecology. The heritage railway landscape is experiencing multiple changes along with a value ambiguity problem. There is a need to comprehensively recognize this [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the role of heritage railways has gradually shifted from transportation, economy, and trade to tourism, culture, and ecology. The heritage railway landscape is experiencing multiple changes along with a value ambiguity problem. There is a need to comprehensively recognize this landscape in order to promote the transformations and monitor the changes. Inspired by Landscape Character Assessment (LCA), this paper adopts a two-scaled identification framework of landscape character types and areas of the Yunnan–Vietnam Railway (Yunnan section) by integrating holistic and parametric methods. At the regional scale, the landscape character was divided by five natural variables: landform, vegetation, hydrology, soil, and geology. At the corridor scale, the landscape character was classified by five natural and cultural variables: altitude, slope, aspect, land use, and heritage density. At these two scales, k-prototype cluster analysis and multiresolution segmentation (MRS) tool were used to identify landscape character types and areas. The results showed that there were 11 different landscape character types and 80 landscape character areas at the regional scale, and 12 different landscape character types and 58 landscape character areas at the corridor scale. Furthermore, the composition, area, and distribution of these landscape character types and areas were described. The results of this study can form a database for planning, management, and evaluation of the railway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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14 pages, 588 KiB  
Article
Preference Model in the Context of Mobility as a Service: A Pilot Case Study
by Antonella Franco and Antonino Vitetta
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 4802; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15064802 - 08 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1277
Abstract
In this paper, a pilot study of a pre-test preference model in the context of mobility as a service (MaaS) is defined by following the steps required for transport system engineering: survey, specification, calibration, and validation. The availability of a MaaS preference model [...] Read more.
In this paper, a pilot study of a pre-test preference model in the context of mobility as a service (MaaS) is defined by following the steps required for transport system engineering: survey, specification, calibration, and validation. The availability of a MaaS preference model is crucial to support decision takers and decision makers before starting planning activities for new, sustainable transport services. In this paper, a pre-test model is proposed for evaluating user preferences. The pre-test model was specified with a Logit random utility model and the parameters were estimated using the maximum likelihood method. To define the preference model, a pilot survey was conducted in the Gioia Tauro area, an extra-urban area in southern Italy. For the pre-test model, a pilot sample of users was considered. In the area, a high percentage of users traveled by an individual transport system; this high percentage was also present in the survey, with 76% traveling by private car. Short- and long-distance scenarios were proposed to users. In the calibrated model, it emerged that bundles were more attractive for long-distance journeys and decreased with the cost of the package. The additional cost in the present scenario influenced the preference for bundle cost. Considering the parking cost in the present scenario (scenario 2), the MaaS preference probability started at higher probability values but increased less quickly. The pre-test model was defined starting from a pilot sample and represents the basis for a larger MaaS preference model built starting from a larger survey and a sample with a greater number of calibrated parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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19 pages, 4115 KiB  
Article
A Comparison of Urban Planning in Eastern Asian Capitals during Japanese Colonial Rule: Tokyo, Taipei (1895), Seoul (1910), and Beijing (1936)
by Kilhun Lee and Seungwoo Yang
Sustainability 2023, 15(5), 4502; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15054502 - 02 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1990
Abstract
Japan’s urban planning system began with the Urban Renewal (1885) and has been modified since then in various ways through the Tokyo City Improvement Ordinance (1888) and the City Planning Law (1919). From 1895 to 1945 (Japanese colonization era), Japan applied and tested [...] Read more.
Japan’s urban planning system began with the Urban Renewal (1885) and has been modified since then in various ways through the Tokyo City Improvement Ordinance (1888) and the City Planning Law (1919). From 1895 to 1945 (Japanese colonization era), Japan applied and tested its urban planning in Taipei (1895–1945), Seoul (1910–1945, Gyeongseong), and Beijing (1936–1945). Although Tokyo was the first city discussed for planning, urban renewal was implemented in other colonized cities in a similar period. What Tokyo, Seoul, Beijing, and Taipei have in common is that they are built around fortress walls. Hence, the present study aims to examine the characteristics of Tokyo’s urban planning and reveal how Japan’s urban planning transformed these cities in East Asia, which had different cultures and styles, during Japanese colonial rule. We analyzed urban renewal projects implemented in each city, the organization of a committee to plan the City Planning Ordinance, the effect of urban planning, the characteristics of urban planning, and changes in existing downtowns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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13 pages, 3058 KiB  
Article
Spatial Form and Conservation Strategy of Sishengci Historic District in Chengdu, China
by Wen Liang, Yahaya Ahmad and Hazrina Haja Bava Mohidin
Heritage 2023, 6(2), 891-903; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage6020049 - 20 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1452
Abstract
The historic district is a carrier to show the urban landscape, and the analysis of the spatial form of the historic district from human behavioral activities is beneficial to grasp the social and functional attributes of the space. Combining with the spatial layout [...] Read more.
The historic district is a carrier to show the urban landscape, and the analysis of the spatial form of the historic district from human behavioral activities is beneficial to grasp the social and functional attributes of the space. Combining with the spatial layout of the Sishengci historic district, the overall spatial structure of the Sishengci historic district is analyzed in terms of integration, connectivity, control, depth, and intelligibility by using the analysis of the axial lines in space syntax through the relationship diagram and quantitative description of the syntax. Based on the findings, targeted conservation strategies are proposed, namely the conservation of the core area of the district, the shaping of the local spirit, and the reconstruction of the social space, which have a guiding significance for the conservation and renewal of the Sishengci historic district. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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17 pages, 5729 KiB  
Article
The Decorative Auspicious Elements of Traditional Bai Architecture in Shaxi Ancient Town, China
by Hua Zhao, Zongsheng Huang, Caijie Deng and Yuxin Ren
Sustainability 2023, 15(3), 1918; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15031918 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1596
Abstract
The lucky cultural characteristics of traditional architecture are of importance. It shows what makes a place unique and the spiritual and material goals people have there. It is thus vital to understand the lucky cultural characteristics of traditional villages. This paper attempts to [...] Read more.
The lucky cultural characteristics of traditional architecture are of importance. It shows what makes a place unique and the spiritual and material goals people have there. It is thus vital to understand the lucky cultural characteristics of traditional villages. This paper attempts to explore the auspicious cultural attributes of the town. We are aiming to reveal the current status of cultural integration in Shaxi’s ancient town so that we can find the problems arising from the development process. Moreover, the research subject is the lucky element of Shaxi Bai’s traditional architecture. Lucky themes include lotuses, unicorns, phoenixes, etc. The research was qualitative and quantitative, so we begin by identifying the lucky elements. Then, we used methods for analysing diversity and complex networks to determine their diversity indices and network model indicators. These findings show the old town’s diversified, lucky culture. However, Buddhist culture dominates the multicultural makeup. Furthermore, the native Bai culture is also conserved and preserved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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17 pages, 3101 KiB  
Article
Spatial Reconstruction and Cultural Practice of Linear Cultural Heritage: A Case Study of Meiguan Historical Trail, Guangdong, China
by Zhicai Wu, Jing Ma and Heqing Zhang
Buildings 2023, 13(1), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13010105 - 31 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2445
Abstract
Linear cultural heritage is a unique and emerging type of large-scale heritage primarily located in rural areas. Despite the fact that much literature has concentrated on the importance of heritage to rural revitalization and development in Western countries, linear cultural heritage production has [...] Read more.
Linear cultural heritage is a unique and emerging type of large-scale heritage primarily located in rural areas. Despite the fact that much literature has concentrated on the importance of heritage to rural revitalization and development in Western countries, linear cultural heritage production has remained largely absent from accounts of rural studies in the context of China. This article aims to address this neglect by examining the spatial reconstruction process of the Meiguan Historical Trail. Based on the theory of the production of space, this article reveals the cultural practice of local ruling elites in mobilizing linear cultural heritage to promote regional competitiveness and how ordinary people question the official space reconstruction policy. The article finds that residents are obedient to government’s efforts, while tourists are suspicious of the superficial cultural restoration. The findings further deepen the understanding of linear cultural heritage production as a rural development location policy. In addition, as an important dynamic force, culture participates in the spatial production of linear cultural heritage, which enriches the cultural dimension of spatial production to a certain extent. The findings offer theoretical direction and policy recommendations for the development and sustainability of linear cultural heritage worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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14 pages, 2351 KiB  
Article
Cultural Identity: A Case Study in The Celebration of the San Antonio De Padua (Lajas, Perú)
by Miguel Angel Ruiz Palacios, Lourdes Guevara Villalobos, Cristiana Pereira Teixeira de Oliveira and Elena María Pérez González
Heritage 2023, 6(1), 351-364; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage6010018 - 30 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2719
Abstract
This study presented the first analytical experience of cultural changes in the Lajas population by analyzing their social perceptions and cultural manifestations. Moreover, an increase in the number of visitors and tourism generated new interactions that often have unknown impacts on a particular [...] Read more.
This study presented the first analytical experience of cultural changes in the Lajas population by analyzing their social perceptions and cultural manifestations. Moreover, an increase in the number of visitors and tourism generated new interactions that often have unknown impacts on a particular community and its people. A qualitative methodology consisting of observations and semi-structured interviews was employed to evaluate the evolution of customs during the celebration of Lajas population religious functions between 2003 and 2018. The study results revealed that in the town of Lajas, while the population recognized ways in which their customs have changed in recent decades, they were unable to determine whether or not such changes affected their cultural identity and the preservation of their cultural heritage. Further, on analyzing the obtained data and comparing it with the proposed theoretical framework, we observed a gap between social participation and public administration management, the transformation of the existing model to a centralized management control model, and the creation of an official identity. Hence, such observations are necessary to lay the foundation for future studies to avoid negative impacts and generate sustainable management strategies that would justify the effort in conserving cultural identity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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20 pages, 5625 KiB  
Article
Modelling and Assessing Sustainable Urban Regeneration for Historic Urban Quarters via Analytical Hierarchy Process
by Can Kara and Aminreza Iranmanesh
Land 2023, 12(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12010072 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2768
Abstract
The push for urban development and the rapid increase in population have left many historic urban cores vulnerable and subject to deterioration. SDG-11 is often mentioned as the goal in UNDP regeneration, revitalization, and preservation projects regarding historic urban sites around the globe. [...] Read more.
The push for urban development and the rapid increase in population have left many historic urban cores vulnerable and subject to deterioration. SDG-11 is often mentioned as the goal in UNDP regeneration, revitalization, and preservation projects regarding historic urban sites around the globe. The goal emphasizes 10 targets that are complex in nature and require closer inspection regarding their interconnectedness when being utilized in real-world scenarios. The current study explores the complexities of the decision-making process in planning urban regeneration projects concerning targets of SDG-11. The study uses a Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) method to investigate how and to what significance the targeted criteria were used in planning for two UNDP urban regeneration project zones in Cyprus. These cases have a complex cultural and socio-political dynamic and pose high contextual significance for the region; therefore, many of these targets are critical in achieving more sustainable regeneration projects. The data collection was done by critically examining the projects’ documentation and conducting interviews with experts involved in the two projects. The data is controlled for internal consistency and anomalies. The study makes its case by comparing the different approaches implemented in these two projects and how effective they were in achieving SDG-11 targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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20 pages, 4780 KiB  
Article
Testing Olmsted’s Lasting Legacy—Comparing Design Theory and the Post-Occupancy Conditions of New York Central Park
by Xun Zhu, Bo Zhang, Shurong Xiang, Wei Zhao and Cheryl Mihalko
Buildings 2022, 12(12), 2217; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12122217 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1852
Abstract
Social media is a rapidly developing field in architecture and landscape research, which is used to understand public opinions and landscape use. The year 2022 sees the 200th birthday of Olmsted, the founding father of landscape architecture in America. While we commemorate Olmsted’s [...] Read more.
Social media is a rapidly developing field in architecture and landscape research, which is used to understand public opinions and landscape use. The year 2022 sees the 200th birthday of Olmsted, the founding father of landscape architecture in America. While we commemorate Olmsted’s ground-breaking contribution to the landscape architecture discipline, in-depth analyses are always required to examine historic legacies for their current relevancy. Taking his first practical work, New York Central Park, as an example, this paper systematically revisits Olmsted’s park design theory and vision, and investigates its post-occupancy conditions from 11,501 posts on TripAdvisor. The results show that the current park use pattern confirms the validity of his scenic image theory. At the same time, his design works have become increasingly popular as public projects to foster social interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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22 pages, 14385 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Spatial and Temporal Distribution and Reuse of Urban Industrial Heritage: The Case of Tianjin, China
by Jiahao Zhang, Hao Sun, Subin Xu and Nobuo Aoki
Land 2022, 11(12), 2273; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11122273 - 12 Dec 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2230
Abstract
Urban industrial heritage is both a physical component of the city and an important carrier of urban memory, but there is still a lack of comprehensive analysis of industrial heritage in Tianjin and a need for a conservation system. This study took the [...] Read more.
Urban industrial heritage is both a physical component of the city and an important carrier of urban memory, but there is still a lack of comprehensive analysis of industrial heritage in Tianjin and a need for a conservation system. This study took the industrial heritage of Tianjin built between 1860 and 1978 as the research object and used GIS technology to analyse the spatial and temporal distribution of industrial heritage and the current state of its reuse. The results show that in the temporal dimension, the distribution of industrial heritage in Tianjin shows a pattern of change of “gathering first, then scattering”, with the 1960s as the time point; in the spatial dimension, the existing industrial heritage shows a pattern of distribution along important transport routes—the Haihe River, the Jingfeng Railway and the Jinpu Railway, and there are three industrial heritage clusters. The conservation and reuse status of industrial heritage varies by resource type, but the overall state is poor. Based on the results of the above analysis, a holistic conservation concept of the “Tianjin Industrial Heritage Route” and a reuse strategy for different resource types of industrial heritage are proposed. This will help to integrate the reuse of Tianjin’s industrial heritage into the sustainable development of the city and provide a reference for the conservation of industrial heritage in other cities in China and even in the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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19 pages, 1385 KiB  
Review
Progress and Prospects in Industrial Heritage Reconstruction and Reuse Research during the Past Five Years: Review and Outlook
by Sunny Han Han and Huimin Zhang
Land 2022, 11(12), 2119; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11122119 - 24 Nov 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3415
Abstract
The reconstruction and reuse of industrial heritage has constituted important means for the protection of that heritage, and has played a crucial role in promoting urban renewal and sustainable urban development. In this study, we reviewed 404 pieces of literature on industrial heritage [...] Read more.
The reconstruction and reuse of industrial heritage has constituted important means for the protection of that heritage, and has played a crucial role in promoting urban renewal and sustainable urban development. In this study, we reviewed 404 pieces of literature on industrial heritage reconstruction and reuse published in the past five years (January 2017 to August 2022), which includes the most representative studies (those published in key journals in the field) or the most influential studies (those highly cited). We then used three keyword tools (WordStat, Weiciyun and CiteSpace) and conducted keyword extraction, analysis and meaning presentation of 404 studies, finally identified three main research themes: (1) the current barriers to industrial heritage reconstruction and reuse, (2) the coping strategies for industrial heritage reconstruction and reuse, and (3) the evaluation of the effects of industrial heritage reconstruction and reuse. Our results revealed and clarified the latest trends in international research. Meanwhile, we also pointed out the inadequacies of the current research, such as ignoring important topics and the limitations of research methods. We hope that our research could inspire future research on industrial heritage reconstruction and reuse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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16 pages, 4022 KiB  
Article
The Need to Articulate Historic and Cultural Dimensions of Landscapes in Sustainable Environmental Planning—A Swedish Case Study
by Ingegärd Eliasson, Susanne Fredholm, Igor Knez and Eva Gustavsson
Land 2022, 11(11), 1915; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11111915 - 27 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2583
Abstract
Ignoring the historic and cultural dimensions of landscapes makes environmental planning unsustainable, which in the long run, will have a negative impact on both the environment and society. This paper examines the work and perceptions of practitioners with a focus on the role [...] Read more.
Ignoring the historic and cultural dimensions of landscapes makes environmental planning unsustainable, which in the long run, will have a negative impact on both the environment and society. This paper examines the work and perceptions of practitioners with a focus on the role of historic and cultural landscape dimensions and their relation to the recent implementation of the ecosystem service framework in sustainable environmental planning. Semi-structured interviews with officials at local and regional planning levels in a Swedish case study showed that the historical landscape forms the basis for environmental work. Respondents expressed an integrated view of the landscape, and historic and cultural landscape dimensions were considered important in the initial planning process. However, several challenges existed later in the planning process and final decision-making, such as conceptual ambiguities, unclear policy and assignments, limited cross-sectorial coordination and lack of awareness, knowledge, resources and other priorities. The results also show that the respondents worked regularly with intangible landscape dimensions, which can be defined as cultural ecosystem services, but they do not label them as such. Furthermore, established knowledge and expertise of heritage planning was not activated in the implementation of the ecosystem service approach. We conclude that historic and cultural landscape dimensions are not ignored in practice, but there is a need to articulate these aspects more clearly in order to achieve sustainable environmental planning. There is also an unexplored opportunity to connect skills and create new forms of cross-sectorial collaboration between heritage planning and the ES approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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23 pages, 5977 KiB  
Article
Applying ICOMOS-IFLA Principles for the Conservation, Management and Reuse of a Historical Hydraulic System: The No-Ras Qanat in North-Western Iran
by Federico Zaina, Paola Branduini and Fereshteh Zavvari
Heritage 2022, 5(4), 3165-3187; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage5040163 - 20 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2349
Abstract
Historical hydraulic systems represent a significant part of landscapes and global heritage. However, from the second half of the 20th century onwards, substantial socio-economic as well as technological changes occurring worldwide have put them at risk of abandonment and, eventually, of disappearing. Recent [...] Read more.
Historical hydraulic systems represent a significant part of landscapes and global heritage. However, from the second half of the 20th century onwards, substantial socio-economic as well as technological changes occurring worldwide have put them at risk of abandonment and, eventually, of disappearing. Recent studies and international conventions, including the ICOMOS-IFLA, framed historical hydraulic systems and water management techniques in a new dimension, not only as an element of the past to be preserved but an active element to achieve sustainable economic development and mitigate climate change. Those qanats or karez represented a major historical hydraulic sustainable solution for irrigation, providing a water supply, which during the last few decades, has been slowly replaced with modern, although polluting and unsustainable, technologies. Building on the recent ICOMOS-IFLA Principles Concerning Rural Landscape as Heritage and the recommendation provided by initial research, this paper aims to show how qanats can become: (1) an important local and regional cultural and natural heritage; (2) a valuable economic resource; (3) an environmentally friendly system that could at least partially replace the existing polluting solution (i.e., dams and other modern infrastructures). To achieve these goals, we propose a restoration or reuse approach for the qanat based on the necessity of multiple stakeholders at local and national levels using sustainable materials and respecting the different values as a heritage place. Our case study is the No-Ras qanat in North-western Iran. In the conclusion, we also illustrate the relevance of the aims and methods of this paper in the light of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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21 pages, 16817 KiB  
Article
Transition of Urban Morphology in the Mountainous Areas Since Early-Modern Times from the Perspective of Urban Historic Landscape—A GIS Tools and Historical Map Translation Approach
by Danjie Shen and Shujing Dong
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12896; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912896 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3204
Abstract
Regenerating cities must blend modernization and heritage. Both urban morphology and Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) highlight historical processes and may assist in regeneration. Using Chongqing as the study example may further understand mountain cities, which are prevalent worldwide but seldom examined in morphology [...] Read more.
Regenerating cities must blend modernization and heritage. Both urban morphology and Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) highlight historical processes and may assist in regeneration. Using Chongqing as the study example may further understand mountain cities, which are prevalent worldwide but seldom examined in morphology research. This study explores and organizes the historical modernization of Chongqing’s parent city from early-modern times to the present day using a universal approach established in this research developed by the HUL perspective and research framework, Geographic information system (GIS), Depthmap tool, and historical map translation method. Large-scale modernization occurred prior to the 1980s, followed by more modest rehabilitation projects. The whole procedure is described by the phrase “Construction first, then planning, then transformation,” which entails a “free growth” block structure at the outset, along with planning control. The study contributes the following: (1) Establishing a theoretical framework and research technique for the universal city based on historical sources and modern instruments; (2) Chongqing’s future sustainable development and historical preservation depend in large part on figuring out the city’s complicated modernization history; (3) The study of mountain cities may benefit from understanding the geographical development and spatial dynamic layering of Chongqing. (4) This study bridges the gap in time by going beyond the early modern period covered by the previous ones and into the post-statehood era (1949–2022). Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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13 pages, 7242 KiB  
Article
Research on the Spatial–Temporal Distribution and Morphological Characteristics of Ancient Settlements in the Luzhong Region of China
by Mengfei Tong, Baihao Li and Zhao Li
Land 2022, 11(9), 1579; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11091579 - 15 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1715
Abstract
This paper focuses on ancient settlements in the Luzhong region (the centre of Shandong Province) of China and analyses the spatial–temporal distribution and morphological characteristics of ancient settlements with the help of GIS technology and the perspectives of archaeology and cultural geography. Specifically, [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on ancient settlements in the Luzhong region (the centre of Shandong Province) of China and analyses the spatial–temporal distribution and morphological characteristics of ancient settlements with the help of GIS technology and the perspectives of archaeology and cultural geography. Specifically, the 1972 settlements collected were used to establish a database of settlement site attributes. Then, the DEM data were superimposed with the settlement sites, and calculations of the kernel density, elevation, slope, aspect, and buffer zone were further carried out. The distribution and characteristics were refined based on quantitative and qualitative analyses. The study found that the Neolithic period, the Shang–Zhou period, and the Qin–Northern and Southern Dynasties were the three high points of settlement development. In these three periods, the centres of the large-scale distribution of settlements experienced changes from a “single centre” to a “continuous belt” to a “double centre’. In general, the spatial and temporal characteristics of the settlement distribution were continuously developed through time, while the spatial characteristics show that the main body continued to change locally. In different periods, settlements tended to be in the alluvial plains located between 20 and 60 m and with a slope of less than 6°. At the same time, they showed the obvious characteristic of living close to water. The past, present, and future are in the same chain of time; meanwhile, these settlements are the predecessors of today’s cities, towns, and villages. So, this study provides a basis for protecting their heritage value and provides a reference for the coordination of human–land relations, which can help achieve global sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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27 pages, 19589 KiB  
Article
Presentation and Elaboration of the Folk Intangible Cultural Heritage from the Perspective of the Landscape
by Qianda Zhuang, Mengying Wan and Guoquan Zheng
Buildings 2022, 12(9), 1388; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings12091388 - 05 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2677
Abstract
The folklore of intangible cultural heritage (FICH) is mainly expressed in folkloric activities, which include traditional festivals, living customs, production practices, folk beliefs, life rituals and folk costumes. The more reasonable and efficient ways to achieve conservation and transmission of FICH have become [...] Read more.
The folklore of intangible cultural heritage (FICH) is mainly expressed in folkloric activities, which include traditional festivals, living customs, production practices, folk beliefs, life rituals and folk costumes. The more reasonable and efficient ways to achieve conservation and transmission of FICH have become an urgent problem to be solved. Landscape presentation offers a potential method to address that by excavating the landscape characteristics of FICH based on its in-depth connotation and development history. This study aims to explore the cultural connotation of the FICH and extract the elements of landscape design, thus presenting and expressing the FICH using landscape as a carrier, to achieve the conservation and inheritance of the FICH. This research took the Taishun Hundred-family Feast culture, one of FICH in Sankui Town, Taishun County, China, as the study case, and extracted the landscape design elements in FICH after its content excavation and conducted presentation with cultural objectification, landscape narrative and contextualization. The results showed that the Hundred-family Feast culture contains rich landscape genes which can be divided into the ritual culture, food culture, festival culture and spiritual culture. Some of the elements in the Hundred-family Feast culture in terms of patterns, forms and colours for the content of activities, material carriers and spiritual places were also extracted for the landscape presentation. According to the different types and places of the Hundred-family Feast culture activities, the centre of Sankui Town is divided into four landscape thematic areas, namely the Hundred-family Feast cultural entrance experience zone, the food culture experience zone, ritual culture experience zone, and activity performance experience zone. The landscape element and spatial carriers were designed and illustrated for conserving and recovering the Hundred-family Feast culture, respectively. This study innovatively analyses the FICH from the perspective of the characteristics and constituent elements of the landscape and establishes a more reasonable framework system for the method of landscape presentation of the FICH in a structured and comprehensive manner. It enriches the theoretical system of intangible cultural heritage protection and its inheritance via landscape presentation methods for folklore activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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18 pages, 5672 KiB  
Article
Students’ Awareness of the Local Cultural and Historical Heritage in Post-Communist Regional Centers: Yekaterinburg, Gyumri, Timisoara
by Mariana Cernicova-Buca, Maria V. Pevnaya, Maria Fedorova and Tatyana Bystrova
Land 2022, 11(9), 1443; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11091443 - 31 Aug 2022
Viewed by 2344
Abstract
The article presents an analysis of students’ awareness of the local cultural and historical heritage in post-communist countries, taking the examples of Yekaterinburg (Russia), Gyumri (Armenia), and Timisoara (Romania). A multidisciplinary methodology was applied, including a sociological survey, visualization of city places, and [...] Read more.
The article presents an analysis of students’ awareness of the local cultural and historical heritage in post-communist countries, taking the examples of Yekaterinburg (Russia), Gyumri (Armenia), and Timisoara (Romania). A multidisciplinary methodology was applied, including a sociological survey, visualization of city places, and assessment of the respondents’ capacity to engage with the identified historical and cultural items. The provided data visualizations demonstrated the preferences of young people for certain spaces, and allowed assessment of young people’s awareness of selected instances of historical and cultural heritage. An attempt was made to estimate critically how historical and cultural objects are included in youth consciousness. An attractive image of the city and its positive perception can be used as a basis for engaging youth participation in the development and promotion of the city. Results can be useful for city managers and administrators, to promote better engagement with this age group and its involvement in promoting the city brand and in place production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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13 pages, 3773 KiB  
Article
The Narrow Mausolea at Conchada Cemetery as Part of Portuguese and European Architectural Heritage
by Jorge Mascarenhas, Lurdes Belgas, Elisabete Vinhas and Fernando G. Branco
Heritage 2022, 5(3), 1852-1864; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage5030096 - 26 Jul 2022
Viewed by 2042
Abstract
Over millennia, death was the origin of great funerary constructions that have come down to us. These constructions aimed at ensuring eternity and perpetuating memory. Funeral art thus appears not in the service of death, but in the service of memory. In the [...] Read more.
Over millennia, death was the origin of great funerary constructions that have come down to us. These constructions aimed at ensuring eternity and perpetuating memory. Funeral art thus appears not in the service of death, but in the service of memory. In the modern age, funerary constructions do not have the dimensions and grandeur they did in ancient times, but there are still constructions with relevant architectural interest, built to perpetuate the memory of important families. In Conchada Cemetery, located in Coimbra, Portugal, a vast and diverse funeral heritage exists. Possessing various architectural styles, almost all built with limestone from the region, the narrow mausoleums stand out from this heritage. This work presents a study carried out on the architecture and construction of two types of narrow mausoleums, existing in the Conchada Cemetery, both of the Neo-Gothic style: one with an entrance from the front, and another from the back. As it is not possible to present the photographs of the burial vaults, since it would represent an intrusive approach to the families, the authors have resorted to representing them through Indian ink and watercolor illustrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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19 pages, 7478 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Urban Sustainability in Cities of The French Way of Saint James (Camino de Santiago Francés) in Castilla y León according to The Spanish Urban Agenda
by Francisco Tomatis, Luisa F. Lozano-Castellanos, Oscar L. García-Navarrete, Adriana Correa-Guimaraes, Maria Sol Wilhelm, Ouiam Fatiha Boukharta, Diana A. Murcia Velasco and José E. Méndez-Vanegas
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9164; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159164 - 26 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1835
Abstract
The emblematic French Way of Saint James (Camino de Santiago Francés) crosses towns, cities, and Spanish regions to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela (Galicia, Spain), However, where is The French Way of Saint James going with respect to the urban sustainability of [...] Read more.
The emblematic French Way of Saint James (Camino de Santiago Francés) crosses towns, cities, and Spanish regions to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela (Galicia, Spain), However, where is The French Way of Saint James going with respect to the urban sustainability of its host cities? As each city is unique and urban sustainability favors the revitalization and transition of urban areas, to know where to go, it is first necessary to establish a diagnosis that makes the different urban situations visible. In this article, the behavior of urban sustainability is analyzed in the six host cities of The French Way of Saint James in the Autonomous Community of Castilla y León, a region characterized by its link with the rural environment and its current depopulation problems. The data and indicators used are officially provided by the Spanish Urban Agenda, which, through the normalization of its values, are able to territorialize the SDGs at the local level and reflect the realities of the cities of Burgos, Astorga, Cacabelos, León, Ponferrada, and Valverde de la Virgen. The results make it possible to diagnose and compare these host cities, identifying weaknesses, skills, and opportunities that favor the promotion of action plans, local or joint (favored by The French Way of Saint James), in the multiple aspects of sustainability. In addition, they show that Valverde de la Virgen is the city with the best performance in terms of urban sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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25 pages, 7739 KiB  
Article
Diversification of Villa-Type Neighborhoods and Its Impact on Housing Shortages in a Growing Saudi Arabian City: A Case Study of Jeddah
by Rahif Maddah, Junhwan Song and Atsushi Deguchi
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7716; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137716 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2266
Abstract
During the urbanization process in Jeddah, evidenced by an annual population growth rate of 9.5%, vacant lots have existed in developed residential areas in spite of the housing shortage. This study aimed at investigating the housing shortage problem and suggesting future solutions based [...] Read more.
During the urbanization process in Jeddah, evidenced by an annual population growth rate of 9.5%, vacant lots have existed in developed residential areas in spite of the housing shortage. This study aimed at investigating the housing shortage problem and suggesting future solutions based on a predictive formula through four tasks: (1) examining the issues induced by population growth; (2) assessing the extent to which articles in the Procedure Manual for Preparation of Residential Land Subdivision (PMPRLS) foster diversity within villa-type neighborhoods; (3) clarifying the extent of the applicability of these articles and the contribution of existing neighborhood patterns to the housing shortage problem; and (4) providing recommendations for developing each kind of villa-type neighborhood to contribute to resolving the housing shortage. The proposed development methods for villa-type neighborhoods were derived from a correlation analysis using PMPRLS-related indicators in all such neighborhoods (103 study sites) in Jeddah and from a predictive regression analysis. This study suggests that each neighborhood class can contribute to resolving the housing shortage problem. In conclusion, diversifying lot areas, population density, and lot widths in current villa-type neighborhoods would have a positive impact on the housing shortage problem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Sustainability in Heritage and Urban Planning)
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