Topic Editors

College of Food Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China
Prof. Dr. Yanbo Wang
School of Food and Health, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048, China
National Engineering Research Center of Seafood, School of Food Science and Technology, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034, China

Future Foods from the Sea

Abstract submission deadline
5 June 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
5 September 2024
Viewed by
19542

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a big challenge for our world to feed ten billion people healthily in the near future without increasing the environmental impact of this process. Land-based and/or emission-intensive expansion of food production is prohibited to avoid the compromise of ecosystem services. We are expecting the ocean to fill the food gap sustainably in the future. Increases in the main seafood sectors—finfish capture and mariculture—are likely, but we should also look elsewhere on the incorporation of marine invertebrates, fish processing byproducts, seaweeds, and microalgae in routine diet to feed people high-quality protein and fat, as well as vitamins and minerals. This Topic will host diverse contributions ranging from research papers to up-to-date reviews dealing with edible sea products from farm to fork as part of dietary transition toward a sustainable and healthy future. It attempts to highlight the development of innovative food products or ingredients from the sea, as well as green and emerging technologies in seafood processing. It includes but is not limited to the following relevant themes:

  • Meat and dairy analogues
  • 3D food printing
  • Food nanotechnology
  • New food ingredients
  • Designer foods
  • Consumers’ behavior
  • Fish byproducts
  • Jellyfish
  • Macroalgal and microalgal biomass
  • Seafood allergens
  • Seafood safety

Prof. Dr. Haohao Wu
Prof. Dr. Yanbo Wang
Prof. Dr. Na Sun
Topic Editors

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Aquaculture Journal
aquacj
- - 2021 15.0 days * CHF 1000 Submit
Fishes
fishes
2.3 1.9 2016 15.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Nutrients
nutrients
5.9 9.0 2009 14.5 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Oceans
oceans
- - 2020 45.2 Days CHF 1600 Submit

* Median value for all MDPI journals in the second half of 2023.


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Published Papers (9 papers)

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16 pages, 8576 KiB  
Article
Impact of Corn Starch Molecular Structures on Texture, Water Dynamics, Microstructure, and Protein Structure in Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) Surimi Gel
Foods 2024, 13(5), 675; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050675 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 279
Abstract
This study systematically investigates the impact of corn starch molecular structures on the quality attributes of surimi gel products. Employing molecular analyses to characterize corn starch, three amylopectin fractions (A, B1, and B2), categorized by the degree of polymerization [...] Read more.
This study systematically investigates the impact of corn starch molecular structures on the quality attributes of surimi gel products. Employing molecular analyses to characterize corn starch, three amylopectin fractions (A, B1, and B2), categorized by the degree of polymerization ranges (6 < X ≤ 12, 12 < X ≤ 24, and 24 < X ≤ 36, respectively) were specifically focused on. The surimi gel quality was comprehensively assessed through texture profile analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, stained section analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicated the substantial volume expansion of corn amylopectin upon water absorption, effectively occupying the surimi gel matrix and fostering the development of a more densely packed protein network. Starch gels with higher proportions of A, B1, and B2 exhibited improved hardness, chewiness, and bound water content in the resultant surimi gels. The weight-average molecular weight and peak molecular weight of corn starch showed a strong positive correlation with surimi gel hardness and chewiness. Notably, the secondary structure of proteins within the surimi gel was found to be independent of corn starch’s molecular structure. This study provides valuable insights for optimizing formulations in surimi gel products, emphasizing the significance of elevated A, B1, and B2 content in corn starch as an optimal choice for crafting dense, chewy, water-retaining surimi gels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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18 pages, 6123 KiB  
Article
Iron Complexes with Antarctic Krill–Derived Peptides Show Superior Effectiveness to Their Original Protein–Iron Complexes in Mice with Iron Deficiency Anemia
Nutrients 2023, 15(11), 2510; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15112510 - 28 May 2023
Viewed by 1395
Abstract
Antarctic krill protein–iron complex and peptide–iron complex were acquired to investigate their iron bioavailability, expression of iron-regulated genes, and in vivo antioxidant capacity. Results indicated that the Antarctic krill peptide–iron complex significantly increased the hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron (SI), and iron contents in [...] Read more.
Antarctic krill protein–iron complex and peptide–iron complex were acquired to investigate their iron bioavailability, expression of iron-regulated genes, and in vivo antioxidant capacity. Results indicated that the Antarctic krill peptide–iron complex significantly increased the hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron (SI), and iron contents in the liver and spleen in iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) mice (p < 0.05) compared with those of the Antarctic krill protein–iron complex. Despite the gene expressions of the divalent metal transporter 1(DMT1), the transferrin (Tf), and the transferrin receptor (TfR) being better regulated by both Antarctic krill peptide–iron complex and protein–iron complex, the relative iron bioavailability of the Antarctic krill peptide–iron complex group (152.53 ± 21.05%) was significantly higher than that of the protein–iron complex group (112.75 ± 9.60%) (p < 0.05). Moreover, Antarctic krill peptide–iron complex could enhance the antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), reduce the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in IDA mice compared with the protein–iron complex, and reduce the cell damage caused by IDA. Therefore, these results indicated that Antarctic krill peptide–iron complex could be used as a highly efficient and multifunctional iron supplement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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15 pages, 2234 KiB  
Article
Chemical-Structural Identification of Crude Gelatin from Jellyfish (Stomolophus meleagris) and Evaluation of Its Potential Biological Activity
Fishes 2023, 8(5), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8050246 - 08 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1464
Abstract
The demand for jellyfish is growing worldwide, especially due to their high nutraceutical value. In this study, the extraction and characterization of crude gelatin from the brown cannonball jellyfish (Stomolophus meleagris), which is periodically found in large volumes on the American [...] Read more.
The demand for jellyfish is growing worldwide, especially due to their high nutraceutical value. In this study, the extraction and characterization of crude gelatin from the brown cannonball jellyfish (Stomolophus meleagris), which is periodically found in large volumes on the American Pacific coasts, were carried out. The crude gelatin obtained by alkaline treatment, with subsequent heat and dialysis treatment, showed an ability to quench free radicals (via ABTS and ORAC methods), and protect human cells against oxidative damage (through inhibition of hemolysis by AAPH), and they protected against mutations caused by aflatoxin B1 in the Salmonella enterica Typhimurium TA100 strain. Furthermore, it was established that these extracts were innocuous for eukaryotic cells (genotoxicity assay). The amino acid profiles indicate a high concentration of glycine and proline, as well as charged amino acids. Electrophoretic, FT-IR, and 1H-NMR studies indicated that one of the main proteins present in this crude gelatin is collagen. The presence of collagen and other proteins was identified by proteomic studies. Alkaline crude gelatin from brown jellyfish could be considered as potential candidates to be evaluated as antioxidant agents in foods in future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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17 pages, 508 KiB  
Review
The Prevalence of Viruses Related to the Production of Mussels and Oysters in Saldanha Bay: A Systematic Review
Aquac. J. 2023, 3(2), 90-106; https://doi.org/10.3390/aquacj3020009 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2078
Abstract
The disposal of treated and untreated sewage near shellfish harvesting areas is a global concern. Discharged sewage may be contaminated with enteric viruses present in human faeces. Bivalve molluscs, in turn, act as vectors for enteric viruses through bioaccumulation and retention of these [...] Read more.
The disposal of treated and untreated sewage near shellfish harvesting areas is a global concern. Discharged sewage may be contaminated with enteric viruses present in human faeces. Bivalve molluscs, in turn, act as vectors for enteric viruses through bioaccumulation and retention of these viruses during the filter-feeding process, resulting in outbreaks of infections due to the consumption of contaminated shellfish. This review was conducted using peer-reviewed articles published from 2012 until September 2022, obtained from online databases such as Google Scholar, Scopus, and Science Direct, highlighting the challenges that the shellfish industry is faced with concerning pollutants ending up in the shellfish production areas. Developed countries have made some advancements by upgrading sewage infrastructures, which reduced viral loads in sewage. However, it is difficult to measure the significance of these improvements, as there are no regulations in place which stipulate the permissible limits for viruses. In most developing countries, including South Africa, there is a lack of effective management plans for virus monitoring in shellfish harvesting areas. The findings of this study indicated a need for extensive research on the origin of viruses, their interactions with other organisms within the marine ecosystem, the quantification of viruses within the Saldanha Bay harbour, and the development of virus management plans which currently are non-existent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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28 pages, 3485 KiB  
Article
Combination of Solid State and Submerged Fermentation Strategies to Produce a New Jellyfish-Based Food
Foods 2022, 11(24), 3974; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11243974 - 08 Dec 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2384
Abstract
This study describes the set-up and optimization of a fermentation strategy applied to a composite raw material containing jellyfish biomass as the principal ingredient. New fermented food was developed by combining fresh jellyfish Rhizostoma pulmo and the sequential solid-state submerged liquid fermentation method [...] Read more.
This study describes the set-up and optimization of a fermentation strategy applied to a composite raw material containing jellyfish biomass as the principal ingredient. New fermented food was developed by combining fresh jellyfish Rhizostoma pulmo and the sequential solid-state submerged liquid fermentation method used in Asian countries for processing a high-salt-containing raw material. Aspergillus oryzae was used to drive the first fermentation, conducted in solid-state conditions, of a jellyfish-based product, here named Jelly paste. The second fermentation was performed by inoculating the Jelly paste with different selected bacteria and yeasts, leading to a final product named fermented Jellyfish paste. For the first time, a set of safety parameters necessary for monitoring and describing a jellyfish-based fermented food was established. The new fermented products obtained by the use of Debaryomyces hansenii BC T3-23 yeast strain and the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MS3 bacterial strain revealed desirable nutritional traits in terms of protein, lipids and total phenolic content, as well as valuable total antioxidant activity. The obtained final products also showed a complex enzyme profile rich in amylase, protease and lipase activities, thus making them characterized by unique composite sensory odor descriptors (umami, smoked, dried fruit, spices). Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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12 pages, 2926 KiB  
Article
Three-Dimensional Printing Properties of Polysaccharide Hydrocolloids–Unrinsed Sturgeon Surimi Complex Hydrogels
Foods 2022, 11(19), 2947; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11192947 - 21 Sep 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1891
Abstract
Herein, the microstructure and mechanical properties of hydrogels consisting of unrinsed sturgeon surimi (URSS) and plant-derived polysaccharides such as κ-carrageenan (KC), konjac gum (KG), xanthan gum (XG), guar gum (GG) and sodium alginate (SA), were studied by texture analysis, rheological measurement and scanning [...] Read more.
Herein, the microstructure and mechanical properties of hydrogels consisting of unrinsed sturgeon surimi (URSS) and plant-derived polysaccharides such as κ-carrageenan (KC), konjac gum (KG), xanthan gum (XG), guar gum (GG) and sodium alginate (SA), were studied by texture analysis, rheological measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Rheological results showed that the apparent viscosity, storage modulus (G′) and loss modulus (G″) of URSS increased by addition of KC, KG, GG and SA. The gel strength of resultant surimi products fabricated with KG/URSS mixture was significantly higher than that of other groups. KG could significantly improve the hardness (44.14 ± 1.14 N), chewiness (160.34 ± 8.33 mJ) and cohesiveness (0.56 ± 0.02) of the unrinsed surimi gel. Adding SA and KC had no significant effect on the textural characteristics of printed gels. However, an apparent decrease in the relevant mechanical properties of printed hydrogels was observed when XG and GG were added into surimi. SEM indicated that the incorporation of KG and KC could further integrate the gel structure of URSS as compared to hindering the cross-linking of surimi protein by XG and GG, which were in accordance with gel strength and water-holding capacity. These results provided useful information to regulate the 3D printing performance in functionalized surimi-based material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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26 pages, 3681 KiB  
Article
Screening of a Novel Lactiplantibacillus plantarum MMB-05 and Lacticaseibacillus casei Fermented Sandwich Seaweed Scraps: Chemical Composition, In Vitro Antioxidant, and Volatile Compounds Analysis by GC-IMS
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2875; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182875 - 16 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1739
Abstract
Lactic acid fermentation is a promising method for developing sandwich seaweed scraps. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of fermentation with Lactiplantibacillus plantarum MMB-05, Lactiplantibacillus casei FJAT-7928, mixed bacteria (1:1, v/v) and control on the physicochemical indexes, in [...] Read more.
Lactic acid fermentation is a promising method for developing sandwich seaweed scraps. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of fermentation with Lactiplantibacillus plantarum MMB-05, Lactiplantibacillus casei FJAT-7928, mixed bacteria (1:1, v/v) and control on the physicochemical indexes, in vitro antioxidant activity, and volatile compounds of Porphyra yezoensis sauce. Sensory evaluation was also performed. The results indicated that all lactic acid bacteria strains grew well in P. yezoensis sauce after 72 h of fermentation, with the viable cell counts of L. plantarum MMB-05 exceeding 10.0 log CFU/mL, the total phenolic content increasing by 16.54%, and the lactic acid content increasing from 0 to 44.38 ± 0.11 mg/mL. Moreover, the metabolism of these strains significantly increased the content of umami, sweet and sour free amino acids in P. yezoensis sauce. The total antioxidant capacity of L. plantarum MMB-05, L. casei FJAT-7928, mix and control groups increased by 594.59%, 386.49%, 410.27%, and 287.62%, respectively. Gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS) analysis suggested that aldehydes and ketones accounted for the largest proportion, and the relative contents of acids and alcohols in P. yezoensis sauce increased significantly after lactic acid bacteria fermentation. In addition, the analysis of dynamic principal component analysis (PCA) and fingerprinting showed that the volatile components of the four treatment methods could be significantly distinguished. Overall, the L. plantarum MMB-05 could be recommended as an appropriate starter for fermentation of sandwich seaweed scraps, which provides a fundamental knowledge for the utilization of sandwiched seaweed scraps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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17 pages, 2260 KiB  
Article
Insight into the Gel Properties of Antarctic Krill and Pacific White Shrimp Surimi Gels and the Feasibility of Polysaccharides as Texture Enhancers of Antarctic Krill Surimi Gels
Foods 2022, 11(16), 2517; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11162517 - 20 Aug 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1946
Abstract
Antarctic krill is a potential and attractive resource for consumption. However, most Antarctic krill meat is used to produce primary products with low commercial value, with few highly processed products. This study aimed to evaluate and improve the gelling properties of Antarctic krill [...] Read more.
Antarctic krill is a potential and attractive resource for consumption. However, most Antarctic krill meat is used to produce primary products with low commercial value, with few highly processed products. This study aimed to evaluate and improve the gelling properties of Antarctic krill surimi, with Pacific white shrimp surimi as control. Compared with Pacific white shrimp surimi, the lower β-sheet content and protein aggregation degree had a severe impact on the formation of the gel network of Antarctic krill surimi, which resulted in weaker breaking force, gel strength, and viscoelasticity (p < 0.05). Moreover, water retention capacity and molecular forces had a positive effect on the stability of the gel matrix of shrimp surimi. Thus, the high α-helix/β-sheet ratio, weak intermolecular interactions, and low level of protein network cross-linkage were the main reasons for the poor quality of Antarctic krill surimi. On this basis, the effects of six polysaccharides on the texture properties of Antarctic krill surimi were studied. Chitosan, konjac glucomannan, sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose, and waxy maize starch resulted in no significant improvement in the texture properties of Antarctic krill surimi (p > 0.05). However, the addition of ι-carrageenan (2%) or κ-carrageenan (1~2%) is an effective way to improve the texture properties of Antarctic krill surimi (p < 0.05). These findings will contribute to the development of reconstituted Antarctic krill surimi products with high nutritional quality and the promotion of deep-processing products of Antarctic krill meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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13 pages, 276 KiB  
Article
Consumer Knowledge and Acceptance of “Algae” as a Protein Alternative: A UK-Based Qualitative Study
Foods 2022, 11(12), 1703; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121703 - 10 Jun 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3776
Abstract
Overconsumption of meat has been recognised as a key contributing factor to the climate emergency. Algae (including macroalgae and microalgae) are a nutritious and sustainable food source that may be utilised as an alternative to animal-based proteins. However, little is known about the [...] Read more.
Overconsumption of meat has been recognised as a key contributing factor to the climate emergency. Algae (including macroalgae and microalgae) are a nutritious and sustainable food source that may be utilised as an alternative to animal-based proteins. However, little is known about the consumer awareness and acceptance of algae as a protein alternative. The aim of this qualitative study was to develop a rich and contextualised understanding of consumer beliefs about the use of algae in novel and innovative food products. A total of 34 participants from the UK assisted with our study. Each participant engaged in one focus group, with six focus groups conducted in total. Existing consumer knowledge of algae was discussed before participants explored the idea of algae-based food products. Reflexive (inductive) thematic analysis was used to analyse these data. Results showed that consumers have limited pre-existing knowledge of algae as a food source; however, participants were open to the idea of trying to consume algae. This anticipated acceptance of algae was influenced by several product attributes, including perceived novelty, edibility, healthiness, sustainability, and affordability. These findings highlight algae as a promising protein alternative to support plant-forward diets in the UK and identify key attributes to consider in future product development and marketing strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Future Foods from the Sea)
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