Topic Editors

Medical School, University of Nicosia, Nicosia 2417, Cyprus
Kent and Medway Medical School, University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury CT2 7FS, UK
Dr. Eirini Kampriani
Medical School, University of Nicosia, Nicosia 2417, Cyprus

Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities

Abstract submission deadline
10 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
25 December 2024
Viewed by
24363

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Social inequalities constitute an urgent challenge in contemporary societies and a domain that needs immediate attention in these uneasy and uncertain times. The diversity competence of service providers has been acknowledged as an important skill to help reduce social disparities in various domains, such as healthcare, social services, education, migration, etc. We are calling for papers whose theoretical, methodological, and substantive approaches advance our thinking around inequity and address issues that are frequently marginalised or neglected in research. This Topic aims to offer a space for health topics, geographical areas, individuals and communities, all of which are often vulnerable and neglected in research, in policies, and in practice. This Topic welcomes innovative contributions on social inequalities, inequalities in healthcare, and diversity competence based on research from a range of methodological orientations. Research articles, reviews and concept papers are welcome and should focus on inequalities in all sectors including healthcare, in addition to any of the following concepts: diversity competence, cultural competence, structural competence, intercultural communication, cultural awareness, cultural humility, cultural sensitivity, cultural empathy, cultural intelligence, etc. In the event that your work is not reflected in the above description and you are interested in submitting it to this Topic, please contact Professor Costas S Constantinou (constantinou.c@unic.ac.cy).

Prof. Dr. Costas S Constantinou
Prof. Dr. Lisa Dikomitis
Dr. Eirini Kampriani
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • social inequalities
  • stigma
  • global health
  • cultural competence
  • health inequalities
  • healthcare
  • diversity
  • intersectionality
  • decolonisation

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education
ejihpe
3.2 3.5 2011 20.1 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Societies
societies
2.1 2.3 2011 32.6 Days CHF 1400 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500 Submit

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Published Papers (13 papers)

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21 pages, 655 KiB  
Article
The Perspectives of Māori and Pasifika Mate Kirikōpū (Endometriosis) Patients in Aotearoa New Zealand
by Katherine Ellis, Jordan Tewhaiti-Smith, Deborah Munro and Rachael Wood
Societies 2024, 14(4), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc14040046 - 30 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1344
Abstract
Experiences with endometriosis have been understudied in indigenous and people of colour populations. This study aimed to investigate the experiences of Māori and Pasifika endometriosis patients in Aotearoa New Zealand. Twenty-seven Māori endometriosis participants from 21 iwi (tribes), and 10 Pasifika participants from [...] Read more.
Experiences with endometriosis have been understudied in indigenous and people of colour populations. This study aimed to investigate the experiences of Māori and Pasifika endometriosis patients in Aotearoa New Zealand. Twenty-seven Māori endometriosis participants from 21 iwi (tribes), and 10 Pasifika participants from 8 different island nations participated in online, asynchronous, anonymous text-based discussions about their endometriosis journeys. Their explanations were analysed qualitatively with an inductive thematic approach. The average delay from symptom onset to a confirmed or suspected endometriosis diagnosis was 11.6 ± 7.8 years in the Māori cohort and 12.4 ± 6.2 years in the Pasifika cohort. There were high levels of dissatisfaction with the availability of treatment, with 66.7% of Māori participants and 60.0% of Pasifika participants feeling that endometriosis treatment was not readily available to them. Poor experiences with the medical profession might dissuade Māori and Pasifika patients from seeking care, exacerbating a culture of distrust and perpetuating healthcare inequities. This could potentially be improved by increasing the capacity to take time for relationship building within general practice or through the incorporation of cultural advisors to support relationship establishment that emphasises holistic consideration of patient well-being and culturally safe care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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15 pages, 232 KiB  
Article
Fighting Hate and Hate Speech: Raising Anti-Hate Awareness through Critical Analysis of Popular Cultural Texts on an Undergraduate Course
by Hyunju Woo and Yoon Y. Cho
Societies 2023, 13(11), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13110240 - 13 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1290
Abstract
Central to the understanding of hate is an apprehension of the complexities of various hate-motivated social attitudes, which include Othering and the production of social, economic, and political hierarchies of domination. While hate speech is endemic both online and offline in contemporary society, [...] Read more.
Central to the understanding of hate is an apprehension of the complexities of various hate-motivated social attitudes, which include Othering and the production of social, economic, and political hierarchies of domination. While hate speech is endemic both online and offline in contemporary society, Korean youths have difficulties recognizing its structural forces. The present study aims to offer an instructional model of a college-level course for identifying and countering hate in everyday life. As participants in this course, students read popular cultural texts thematizing hate, wrote critical reviews, and held group discussions to develop anti-hate critical thinking and raise awareness about online hate speech and hate-motivated social behavior. They showed significant progress in the surveys, which measured anti-hate critical thinking, as well as during the course, as they proceeded from observing and identifying hate speech to formulating and articulating proactive strategies to challenge it. This study provided an opportunity for college students to develop good citizenship in reading hate speech and representations of hate in popular cultural texts with a critical eye, and to reflect on the problem of hate in society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
23 pages, 762 KiB  
Article
Income Inequality, Institutions, and Freedom of the Press: Potential Mechanisms and Evidence
by Umut Uzar
Sustainability 2023, 15(17), 12927; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151712927 - 27 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1378
Abstract
In the last few decades, income distribution has deteriorated in a large part of the world. The inability to stop inequality has evolved into a major social crisis and has become one of the most urgent issues globally. Given the importance of the [...] Read more.
In the last few decades, income distribution has deteriorated in a large part of the world. The inability to stop inequality has evolved into a major social crisis and has become one of the most urgent issues globally. Given the importance of the issue, identifying the root causes of inequality can be a guide for policy makers in solving the problem. Although there are a few studies linking institutional quality with income inequality in recent years, the question of whether freedom of the press affects income distribution remains unanswered. This study is the first attempt to address this question. With this motivation, the study researches the influences of institutional quality and freedom of the press on income inequality for the BRICS-T (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa, and Turkey) countries for the period 1993–2016. Moreover, globalization, economic growth, and trade openness are included in the model to avoid the problem of omitted variable bias in explaining inequality. The study findings indicate that institutional quality and freedom of press, which are the main independent variables for the entire panel, reduce inequality. In addition, although trade openness is a factor that reduces inequality, globalization and economic growth are not statistically significant. Although the country-specific estimates show heterogeneity, they are quite promising in terms of inequality, institutional quality, and freedom of the press. In this framework, policy makers can reduce inequalities by designing policies that emphasize institutional quality and freedom of the press. With such a win-win opportunity, BRICS-T countries can achieve two important gains to reach developed country status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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15 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Minority Stress and Depressive Symptoms in the LGBTQA Population from Poland
by Aleksandra Cisek and Aleksandra M. Rogowska
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2023, 13(6), 1000-1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe13060076 - 08 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1719
Abstract
The cross-sectional study examines minority stress and depression symptoms regarding various sexual and gender minority (SGM) identities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and asexual (LGBTQA) individuals from Poland. The online survey was conducted among 509 people. Participants aged between 18 and 47 [...] Read more.
The cross-sectional study examines minority stress and depression symptoms regarding various sexual and gender minority (SGM) identities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and asexual (LGBTQA) individuals from Poland. The online survey was conducted among 509 people. Participants aged between 18 and 47 (M = 22.39, SD = 4.78). Gender identity included 262 cisgender women, 74 cisgender men, 31 transgender women, 53 transgender men, and 89 nonbinary individuals. Sexual identity comprises 197 bisexual, 150 homosexual, 78 pansexual, 33 asexual, 21 undefined, 14 heterosexual, 9 demisexuals, 6 queer, and 1 sapiosexual individual. The Daily Heterosexist Experiences Questionnaire (DHEQ) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale—Revised (CESD-R) were used to measure minority stress and depression symptoms, respectively. Among LGBTQA participants, 99.80% declared minority stress at least once during the past year. In particular, vicarious trauma was experienced in 99.80% of participants, vigilance in 95.87%, harassment and discrimination in 80.35%, stress related to the family of origin in 69.16%, and to gender expression in 68.76% of respondents. Depression symptoms were found in 62.50% of respondents. Significantly higher rates of depression and minority stress were presented in dual than single SGM individuals. Binomial logistic regression showed that such sources of minority stress as vigilance, harassment, and gender expression could predict depression symptoms. Therefore, prevention and intervention programs should be designed for the LGBTQA population focusing on coping with these sources of minority stress, especially among those of dual SGM identity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
22 pages, 662 KiB  
Review
The Culturally Competent Healthcare Professional: The RESPECT Competencies from a Systematic Review of Delphi Studies
by Costas S. Constantinou and Monica Nikitara
Societies 2023, 13(5), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13050127 - 16 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2123
Abstract
Background: In the existing literature, there are many guidelines regarding cultural competencies for healthcare professionals and many instruments aiming to measure cultural competence. However, there is no consensus on which core cultural competencies are necessary for healthcare professionals. Aim and Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: In the existing literature, there are many guidelines regarding cultural competencies for healthcare professionals and many instruments aiming to measure cultural competence. However, there is no consensus on which core cultural competencies are necessary for healthcare professionals. Aim and Methods: This study employed the PRISMA 2020 statement to systematically review Delphi studies and identify the core cultural competencies on which experts, who have been working with diverse populations in the fields of healthcare and allied healthcare, have reached a consensus. For this purpose, we searched, retrieved, and reviewed all Delphi studies conducted between 2000 and 2022 in the databases Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, and PsycInfo and coded and synthesised the results qualitatively. Results: The systematic search resulted in 15 Delphi studies that met eligibility criteria and in which 443 experts from 37 different countries around the globe had participated. The review of these Delphi studies showed that the core competencies necessary for healthcare professionals to ensure that they provide culturally congruent care were: Reflect, Educate, Show Interest and Praise, Empathise, and Collaborate for Therapy. Discussion and Conclusion: These competencies make the abbreviation and word RESPECT, which symbolically places emphasis on respect as the overarching behaviour for working effectively with diversity. The study also provides a new, comprehensive definition of the cultural competence of healthcare professionals and opens new directions in formulating standardised guidelines and research in cultural competence in healthcare and allied healthcare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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12 pages, 765 KiB  
Article
Race and Ethnicity Misclassification in Hospital Discharge Data and the Impact on Differences in Severe Maternal Morbidity Rates in Florida
by Chinyere N. Reid, Renice Obure, Jason L. Salemi, Chinwendu Ilonzo, Judette Louis, Estefania Rubio and William M. Sappenfield
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(9), 5689; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20095689 - 30 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1600
Abstract
Hospital discharge (HD) records contain important information that is used in public health and health care sectors. It is becoming increasingly common to rely mostly or exclusively on HD data to assess and monitor severe maternal morbidity (SMM) overall and by sociodemographic characteristics, [...] Read more.
Hospital discharge (HD) records contain important information that is used in public health and health care sectors. It is becoming increasingly common to rely mostly or exclusively on HD data to assess and monitor severe maternal morbidity (SMM) overall and by sociodemographic characteristics, including race and ethnicity. Limited studies have validated race and ethnicity in HD or provided estimates on the impact of assessing health differences in maternity populations. This study aims to determine the differences in race and ethnicity reporting between HD and birth certificate (BC) data for maternity hospitals in Florida and to estimate the impact of race and ethnicity misclassification on state- and hospital-specific SMM rates. We conducted a population-based retrospective study of live births using linked BC and HD records from 2016 to 2019 (n = 783,753). BC data were used as the gold standard. Race and ethnicity were categorized as non-Hispanic (NH)-White, NH-Black, Hispanic, NH-Asian Pacific Islander (API), and NH-American Indian or Alaskan Native (AIAN). Overall, race and ethnicity misclassification and its impact on SMM at the state- and hospital levels were estimated. At the state level, NH-AIAN women were the most misclassified (sensitivity: 28.2%; positive predictive value (PPV): 25.2%) and were commonly classified as NH-API (30.3%) in HD records. NH-API women were the next most misclassified (sensitivity: 57.3%; PPV: 85.4%) and were commonly classified as NH-White (5.8%) or NH-other (5.5%). At the hospital level, wide variation in sensitivity and PPV with negative skewing was identified, particularly for NH-White, Hispanic, and NH-API women. Misclassification did not result in large differences in SMM rates at the state level for all race and ethnicity categories except for NH-AIAN women (% difference 78.7). However, at the hospital level, Hispanic women had wide variability of a percent difference in SMM rates and were more likely to have underestimated SMM rates. Reducing race and ethnicity misclassification on HD records is key in assessing and addressing SMM differences and better informing surveillance, research, and quality improvement efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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23 pages, 4528 KiB  
Article
Analysis on the Satisfaction of Public Cultural Service by Township Residents: A Qualitative Perspective
by Chuanming Sun, Guoxin Tan, Xingyu Chai and Haiqing Zhang
Sustainability 2023, 15(9), 7302; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15097302 - 27 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1309
Abstract
The intense development of urban–rural integration has brought about a constant increase in people’s demand for public culture. In particular, as the equalization of public cultural services is promoted, narrowing the gap between the services offered in urban and rural settings has gradually [...] Read more.
The intense development of urban–rural integration has brought about a constant increase in people’s demand for public culture. In particular, as the equalization of public cultural services is promoted, narrowing the gap between the services offered in urban and rural settings has gradually become the dominant orientation to promote urban–rural integration and enhance the rights and interests of the people. Starting from the principles of the new public service, this research conducted field interviews in Xuling Town, Anhui Province, China. The Zaltman metaphor elicitation technique (ZMET) was used to analyze the interview content, and five inferences about the construction of township public culture were drawn: (1) cultural facilities have a significant impact on township public cultural construction; (2) the role of cultural talents is essential but lack of talent is normal in townships; (3) carrying out cultural activities is the top priority of township public cultural construction; (4) cultural management is an indispensable auxiliary link but the management level is insufficient; (5) and the cultural activities of traditional festivals are particularly important. Moreover, on the basis of these five inferences, the fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) method was used to analyze the survey data and verify the underlying problems around public cultural service effectiveness as well as resource allocation in township areas. Finally, countermeasures are proposed on how to narrow the gap, which are of reference significance for improving the quality of township public cultural services in the context of urban–rural integration and meeting the cultural needs of residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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23 pages, 1815 KiB  
Article
Human Mobility, Sociolinguistic Diversity, and Social Sustainability in Rural Areas: Insights from Indonesian Transmigrant Communities
by Kamaludin Yusra and Yuni Budi Lestari
Sustainability 2023, 15(4), 3615; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15043615 - 16 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1393
Abstract
A substantial number of studies have been completed with respect to human mobility, linguistic diversity, and social sustainability in the Global North, but very few have been undertaken in relation to the Global South. Mobility, diversity, and sustainability are not recent phenomena, but [...] Read more.
A substantial number of studies have been completed with respect to human mobility, linguistic diversity, and social sustainability in the Global North, but very few have been undertaken in relation to the Global South. Mobility, diversity, and sustainability are not recent phenomena, but little, if anything, is understood as regards how human mobility leads to linguistic diversity and social sustainability. This article fills this gap by explaining how the transmigrants of Javanese, Balinese, and Sasak ethnic backgrounds, along with the Bima and Dompu host communities, have established the ethnically and linguistically multi-diverse transmigrant communities of Manggelewa on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa. Data were collected from the participant ethnographic observations of the communities. The main strategies for data collection included taking notes, collecting documents, distributing questionnaires concerning human mobility, sociolinguistic diversity, and social sustainability, interviewing key informants, and recording conversations. Employing qualitative, quantitative, and ethnographic analyses, the study exhibits the community’s dynamic mobility, sociolinguistic diversity, and social sustainability. The study displays how human mobility leads to sociolinguistic diversity and how the diversity is used as a resource for sustaining a better interethnic relationship. The dimensions of mobility, sociolinguistic diversity, and social sustainability are discussed, and the factors that are essential for symbolic social sustainability are statistically attested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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12 pages, 872 KiB  
Article
Effect of Socioeconomic Status on Altruistic Behavior in Chinese Middle School Students: Mediating Role of Empathy
by Xiaomin Liu, Yuqing Zhang, Zihao Chen, Guangcan Xiang, Hualing Miao and Cheng Guo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043326 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1939
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that socioeconomic status is correlated to altruistic behavior. The role of empathy as one of the motivations for altruistic behavior is gradually gaining attention among researchers. This study explores the role of empathy in the mechanisms of socioeconomic status [...] Read more.
Previous studies have shown that socioeconomic status is correlated to altruistic behavior. The role of empathy as one of the motivations for altruistic behavior is gradually gaining attention among researchers. This study explores the role of empathy in the mechanisms of socioeconomic status and altruistic behavior in Chinese adolescents. A total of 253 middle school students from Northern China participated in this study, which included the dictator game and Interpersonal Relation Index. Results showed that (1) low-SES students behaved more generously than high-SES students; (2) the students were more generous to the low-SES recipients, as shown when offering them more money in the dictator game; (3) affective rather than cognitive empathy mediates the relationship between socioeconomic status and altruistic behavior. The findings provide evidence for the validation of the empathy–altruism hypothesis in a group of Chinese adolescents. Meanwhile, it reveals the path to improving altruistic behavior through the promotion of empathy, especially for individuals of high socioeconomic status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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13 pages, 260 KiB  
Article
Perspectives of Aboriginal People Affected by Cancer on the Need for an Aboriginal Navigator in Cancer Treatment and Support: A Qualitative Study
by Rosalie D. Thackrah, Lenelle P. Papertalk, Karen Taylor, Emma V. Taylor, Heath Greville, Leanne G. Pilkington and Sandra C. Thompson
Healthcare 2023, 11(1), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11010114 - 30 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1798
Abstract
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians suffer higher rates of cancer and poorer outcomes than the wider population. These disparities are exacerbated by rurality and remoteness due to reduced access and limited engagement with health services. This study explored the cancer journeys of [...] Read more.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians suffer higher rates of cancer and poorer outcomes than the wider population. These disparities are exacerbated by rurality and remoteness due to reduced access and limited engagement with health services. This study explored the cancer journeys of Aboriginal patients and carers, and their views on the establishment of an Aboriginal Patient Navigator role within the Western Australian healthcare system to support cancer patients and their families. Sixteen Aboriginal participants were interviewed either face to face, by telephone, or via video conferencing platforms. The interviews were then recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed using standard qualitative techniques. Close consultation within the research team enhanced the rigour and robustness of the study findings. Patients and carers identified many gaps in cancer service delivery that made their experiences stressful and unnecessarily complex. Challenges included a lack of stable accommodation, financial burdens, constant travel, being “off-Country”, and miscommunication with health professionals. Key sources of support and strength were the centrality of family and ongoing cultural connectedness. All participants were supportive of an Aboriginal Patient Navigator role that could address shortfalls in cancer service delivery, especially for patients from rural and remote communities. A culturally safe model of support has the potential to increase access, reduce anxiety and improve health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
(This article belongs to the Section Health Policy)
15 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Social Representations of Social Work in the Sri Lankan Cultural Context: A Qualitative Study
by Masateru Higashida, Amarawansa Ranaweera and Chulani Herath
Sustainability 2022, 14(23), 16197; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142316197 - 05 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1922
Abstract
This preliminary study examines the social representations of social work relevant to the Sri Lankan cultural context while considering indigenous social work discourses. Under the conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic, six Sri Lankan social workers participated in online semistructured interviews. The interview data [...] Read more.
This preliminary study examines the social representations of social work relevant to the Sri Lankan cultural context while considering indigenous social work discourses. Under the conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic, six Sri Lankan social workers participated in online semistructured interviews. The interview data underwent thematic analysis, from which four main themes emerged: social work views and positionality; the relation between social work education and practice; contexts and distinctive practices; and issues and challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interviewees’ narratives detailed how social work is represented in sociocultural contexts, emphasising community work and comparing local practices with Western-rooted professional social work discourses. Some interviewees’ accounts also reported challenges surrounding social work education and the issues of social work practice in a multiethnic and multireligious society. The findings suggest the need for further research, with dialogue and reciprocal exchanges by stakeholders, to explore the diverse social representations of social work in the global and local contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
13 pages, 336 KiB  
Article
High Achievers from Low Family Socioeconomic Status Families: Protective Factors for Academically Resilient Students
by Yan Yan and Xiaosong Gai
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 15882; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192315882 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2674
Abstract
Students with low family socioeconomic status (SES) often have lower academic achievement than their peers with high family SES, as has been widely demonstrated. Nevertheless, there is a group of students beating the odds and achieving academic excellence despite the socio-economic background of [...] Read more.
Students with low family socioeconomic status (SES) often have lower academic achievement than their peers with high family SES, as has been widely demonstrated. Nevertheless, there is a group of students beating the odds and achieving academic excellence despite the socio-economic background of their families. The students who have the capacity to overcome adversities and achieve successful educational achievements are referred to as academically resilient students. This study’s purpose was to identify the protective factors among academically resilient students. A total of 46,089 students from 303 primary schools in grade 6, 55,477 students from 256 junior high schools in grade 9, and 37,856 students from 66 high schools in grade 11 in a city in northeast China participated in the large-scale investigation. Students completed a structured questionnaire to report their demographic information, psychological characteristics, and three academic tests. A causal comparative research model was applied to determine significant protective factors associated with resilient students (referring to students are resilient if they are among the 25% most socio-economically disadvantaged students in their city but are able to achieve the top 25% or above in all three academic domains). Multivariable logistic regression analyses found that the intrinsic protective factors for resilient students included higher proportion of academic importance identity, higher proportion of achievement approaching motivation, longer-term future educational expectation, and more positive academic emotion compared with non-resilient students; the extrinsic protective factors included parents’ higher proportion of positive expectations for their children’ future development, as well as more harmonious peer and teacher–student relationships. The results of this study provide important targets for psychological intervention of disadvantaged students, and future intervention studies can increase their likelihood of becoming resilient students by improving their recognition of the importance of learning, stronger motivation for achievement approaching, longer-term expectations for future academic careers, and positive academic emotions and harmonious teacher–student relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
14 pages, 755 KiB  
Article
Utilizing Listening Sessions to Assess COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance among Asian Americans in Michigan
by Olivia Ford, Rachel Bessire, Alice Jo Rainville and Tsu-Yin Wu
Healthcare 2022, 10(11), 2284; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10112284 - 14 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1497
Abstract
SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) hospitalizations and deaths have been in the forefront of healthcare and public health for the past two years. Despite widespread vaccinations campaigns, infection rates and serious illness and death remain high among immigrant and minority communities. There are many factors that [...] Read more.
SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) hospitalizations and deaths have been in the forefront of healthcare and public health for the past two years. Despite widespread vaccinations campaigns, infection rates and serious illness and death remain high among immigrant and minority communities. There are many factors that increase the risk of hospitalization and death, including overall health of the individual as well as environmental and socioeconomic factors. Seven virtual listening sessions with 39 Asian American adults were conducted to assess acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines. Lack of access, confusion on eligibility, distrust of mass vaccination sites, and fear of long-term side effects were primary barriers to vaccine acceptance. Perspectives on the vaccines varied by ethnic groups, with Bangladeshi and Yemeni participants more likely to have negative views. Our findings show that while national statistics of the broad category “Asian” indicate higher COVID-19 vaccination rates than other minority groups, there are Asian ethnic groups that may not follow these trends. These groups are important to prioritize as they may be at increased risk for exposure and severe illness. However, these groups can be difficult to access for reasons such as language barriers and cultural norms. Information from these listening sessions was used to create resources and programs to clarify misconceptions and increase access to COVID-19 vaccines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Diversity Competence and Social Inequalities)
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