Topic Editors

Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Education and Human Sciences, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA
College of Allied Health Professions, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
Pediatrics Department, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA

Novel Therapeutic Nutrient Molecules, 2nd Volume

Abstract submission deadline
30 September 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Topic Issue entitled “Novel Therapeutic Nutrient Molecules” will focus on the protective role of bioactive nutrient molecules as a therapeutic approach and against disease pathogenesis. The identification of novel nutrient molecules for therapeutics or to prevent disease pathogenesis has been an attractive approach due to the ease of their translation to the general population. The field of bioactive nutrient molecules protecting against human health outcomes has recently grown thanks to new knowledge. Our Topic Issue will consider original articles, commentaries, and review articles that focus on (but are not limited to) the following potential topics:

  • Investigations related to the nutrients of foods and their effects in improving human health;
  • Investigations related to novel nutrient compounds and their impact on the human gut microbiome and gut health;
  • Investigations related to the gut bioactive metabolites of nutrient molecules and their impact on human health;
  • The novel protective roles of vitamins and their metabolites against adverse health outcomes.

Dr. Sathish Kumar Natarajan
Dr. Jiujiu Yu
Dr. Corrine K Hanson
Dr. Melissa Thoene
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • bioactive nutrients
  • plant-derived exosome like nano particles
  • extracellular vesicles
  • gut microbial metabolites
  • gut-derived metabolites
  • nutrient signaling
  • phytochemicals

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
BioMed
biomed
- - 2021 27 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Biomedicines
biomedicines
4.7 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Current Issues in Molecular Biology
cimb
3.1 2.4 1999 13.5 Days CHF 2200 Submit
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Nutrients
nutrients
5.9 9.0 2009 14.5 Days CHF 2900 Submit

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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11 pages, 905 KiB  
Article
Dietary Inflammatory Potential and Bone Outcomes in Midwestern Post-Menopausal Women
by Mariah Kay Jackson, Laura D. Bilek, Nancy L. Waltman, Jihyun Ma, James R. Hébert, Sherry Price, Laura Graeff-Armas, Jill A. Poole, Lynn R. Mack, Didier Hans, Elizabeth R. Lyden and Corrine Hanson
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4277; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194277 - 7 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2052
Abstract
Little is known about the inflammatory potential of diet and its relation to bone health. This cross-sectional study examined the association between the inflammatory potential of diet and bone-related outcomes in midwestern, post-menopausal women enrolled in the Heartland Osteoporosis Prevention Study (HOPS) randomized [...] Read more.
Little is known about the inflammatory potential of diet and its relation to bone health. This cross-sectional study examined the association between the inflammatory potential of diet and bone-related outcomes in midwestern, post-menopausal women enrolled in the Heartland Osteoporosis Prevention Study (HOPS) randomized controlled trial. Dietary intake from the HOPS cohort was used to calculate Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) scores, which were energy-adjusted (E-DIITM) and analyzed by quartile. The association between E-DII and lumbar and hip bone mineral density (BMD) and lumbar trabecular bone scores (TBS; bone structure) was assessed using ANCOVA, with pairwise comparison to adjust for relevant confounders (age, education, race/ethnicity, smoking history, family history of osteoporosis/osteopenia, BMI, physical activity, and calcium intake). The cohort included 272 women, who were predominately white (89%), educated (78% with college degree or higher), with a mean BMI of 27 kg/m2, age of 55 years, and E-DII score of −2.0 ± 1.9 (more anti-inflammatory). After adjustment, E-DII score was not significantly associated with lumbar spine BMD (p = 0.53), hip BMD (p = 0.29), or TBS at any lumbar location (p > 0.05). Future studies should examine the longitudinal impact of E-DII scores and bone health in larger, more diverse cohorts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Novel Therapeutic Nutrient Molecules, 2nd Volume)
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12 pages, 1702 KiB  
Article
Glutamine Supplementation Preserves Glutamatergic Neuronal Activity in the Infralimbic Cortex, Which Delays the Onset of Mild Cognitive Impairment in 3×Tg-AD Female Mice
by Ji Hyeong Baek, Jae Soon Kang, Miyoung Song, Dong Kun Lee and Hyun Joon Kim
Nutrients 2023, 15(12), 2794; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15122794 - 19 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1595
Abstract
It was recently found that glutamine (Gln) supplementation activates glutamatergic neurotransmission and prevents chronic-stress-induced mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this study, we evaluated the effects of Gln on glutamatergic activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and the onset of cognitive impairment in a [...] Read more.
It was recently found that glutamine (Gln) supplementation activates glutamatergic neurotransmission and prevents chronic-stress-induced mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this study, we evaluated the effects of Gln on glutamatergic activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and the onset of cognitive impairment in a triple-transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mouse model (3×Tg-AD). Female 3×Tg-AD mice were fed a normal diet (3×Tg) or a Gln-supplemented diet (3×Tg+Gln) from 2 to 6 months of age. Glutamatergic neuronal activity was analyzed at 6 months, and cognitive function was examined at 2, 4, and 6 months. 3×Tg mice exhibited a decrease in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the infralimbic cortex, but 3×Tg+Gln mice did not. The 3×Tg group showed MCI at 6 months of age, but the 3×Tg+Gln group did not. The expressions of amyloid peptide, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IBA-1 were not elevated in the infralimbic cortex in the 3×Tg+Gln group. Therefore, a Gln-supplemented diet could delay the onset of MCI even in a mouse model predisposed to cognitive impairment and dementia through genetic modification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Novel Therapeutic Nutrient Molecules, 2nd Volume)
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