Topic Editors

Dr. Georgia Ntatsi
1. Institute of Plant Breeding and Genetic Resources, Hellenic Agricultural Organisation, ELGO – DEMETER, Thermi, GR-57001 Thessaloniki, Greece
2. Laboratory of Vegetable Production, Department of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Dipartimento di Agraria, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Loc. Feo di Vito, I-89129 Reggio Calabria, Italy

Plants Nutrients, 2nd Volume

Abstract submission deadline
1 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 January 2025
Viewed by
1549

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the successful completion of Volume I of “Plants Nutrients” and considering the great interest in this research topic, we are pleased to announce the launch of Volume II. The study of the manner in which plants obtain and use nutrients, namely plant nutrition, is central for feeding the ever-growing global population, improving modern agricultural practices, environmental protection, as well as understanding plant ecological interactions in natural ecosystems. Recently, there has been an upsurge in research and a renewed interest in the field of plant nutrition as contemporary experimental approaches are being used to examine the mechanisms underlying plant nutrient transport and utilization. This has been driven by the availability of new powerful tools, including molecular techniques and complete genome sequences, and the development of model plant systems and sophisticated tools to study plant physiology. The present Topic aims to host and gather relevant high-quality papers concerned with multiple different aspects of the biology of plant nutrients, such as: uptake mechanisms; short- and long-distance transport; functions in planta; source–sink relationships; yield and yield quality; relationships with plant diseases and pests; diagnosis of deficiency and toxicity; as well as plant–soil relationships, including rhizosphere chemistry; symbiotic interactions; and the involvement of carbon fluxes in terrestrial agricultural and forestry ecosystems.

Dr. Georgia Ntatsi
Dr. Maurizio Badiani
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • plant macronutrients
  • plant micronutrients
  • plant nutrition’s molecular physiology
  • plant nutrients’ source–sink relationships
  • plant nutrition and yield
  • plant nutrition and yield quality
  • plant–soil interactions
  • rhizosphere
  • nitrogen fixation
  • plant nutrients and carbon cycling

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Crops
crops
- - 2021 30.5 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Forests
forests
2.9 4.5 2010 16.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Horticulturae
horticulturae
3.1 2.4 2015 14.7 Days CHF 2200 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 5.4 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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13 pages, 1601 KiB  
Article
Optimizing Soybean Crop Performance through the Integrated Application of Organic and Chemical Fertilizers: A Study on Alkaline Soil in Afghanistan
by Abdul Basir Turabi, Safiullah Habibi, Kifayatullah Kakar, Shafiqullah Aryan, Mohammad Daud Haidari and Sabqatullah Alipour
Crops 2024, 4(1), 82-94; https://doi.org/10.3390/crops4010007 - 07 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1062
Abstract
The excess application of chemical fertilizer contributes to environmental pollution. Therefore, this study aims to explore the integrated use of animal manure and chemical fertilizer to identify a more sustainable and environmentally friendly alternative to nitrogen fertilizer. Two experiments were conducted in 2018 [...] Read more.
The excess application of chemical fertilizer contributes to environmental pollution. Therefore, this study aims to explore the integrated use of animal manure and chemical fertilizer to identify a more sustainable and environmentally friendly alternative to nitrogen fertilizer. Two experiments were conducted in 2018 and 2019 at Kabul University, Afghanistan, using an LD04-13265 soybean variety. The integration of animal manure and chemical fertilizer was categorized into six treatments: (1) control (no fertilizer), (2) animal manure low dose (AMLD), (3) animal manure high dose (AMHD), (4) chemical fertilizer (CF), (5) CF 50% + AMLD, and (6) CF 75% + AMLD. The results revealed that AMHD and its integration with 75% chemical fertilizer greatly influenced the vegetative growth of soybean plants in experiments I and II. The number of pods per plant and pod length significantly (p < 0.05) increased under the CF 75% + AMLD treatment. In experiment I, soybean yield increased the most with the CF treatment, followed by CF 75% + AMLD. In contrast, in experiment II, the highest yield per hectare was observed in the CF 75% + AMLD treatment, followed by CF. The CF 75% + AMLD treatment significantly increased the SPAD value in both experiments. Consequently, a strong relationship was observed between the SPAD value and yield (r = 0.74) in experiment I and between SPAD and pod length (r = 0.82) in experiment II. Incorporating animal manure with chemical fertilizer significantly impacted soybean growth and yield, offering a potential possibility for reducing reliance on nitrogen fertilizer application to mitigate environmental pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plants Nutrients, 2nd Volume)
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