Topic Editors

Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
Dr. Baoguo Shi
Beijing Key Laboratory of Learning and Cognition, School of Psychology, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048, China
Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China

Understanding Scientific Creativity

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 September 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 November 2023)
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10745

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Creativity is the foundation of human civilizations, and all progress and innovation depend on the ability of humans to create new things. While some researchers hold that creativity is domain-general, some other researchers have also hold that creativity is domain-specific (Baer, 1991; Han, 2003; Kaufman and Baer, 2008). Scientific creativity is a very important domain, and many studies focus on this topic. Researchers who study scientific creativity or any related research relevant to this topic are encouraged to submit a manuscript to this collection. This collection is not limited to empirical studies, we also welcome literature review and theoretical papers. Topics of interest to this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following:

  • Review and theoretical papers relevant to the scientific creativity, or relevant to domain-general and domain-specific approaches to creativity;
  • Studies attempting to develop measurements of scientific creativity;
  • The genetic basis and cognitive neural mechanism of scientific creativity or artistic creativity;
  • Education and scientific creativity. Study designs to improve studies’ scientific creative problem solving or scientific creativity;
  • The development of scientific creativity or scientific learning of adolescents.

Please note that the Section “Planned Papers” on the webpage does not imply that these papers will eventually be accepted; all manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s normal and rigorous peer review process.

Dr. Wenjing Yang
Dr. Baoguo Shi
Prof. Dr. Jiang Qiu
Topic Editors

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Behavioral Sciences
behavsci
2.6 3.0 2011 21.5 Days CHF 2200
Education Sciences
education
3.0 4.0 2011 24.9 Days CHF 1800
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education
ejihpe
3.2 3.5 2011 20.1 Days CHF 1400
Journal of Intelligence
jintelligence
3.5 2.5 2013 32.8 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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13 pages, 675 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Mindful Parenting on Children’s Creative Tendencies: The Chain Mediating Effect of Parent–Child Intimacy and Connectedness to Nature
by Jingyu He, Ziming Wang, Yue Zhang, Shuo Feng, Jinxia Han, Hehong Quan and Chun Li
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14030223 - 10 Mar 2024
Viewed by 916
Abstract
(1) Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies and to investigate the mediating role of parent–child intimacy and connectedness to nature in the relationship between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies. (2) [...] Read more.
(1) Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies and to investigate the mediating role of parent–child intimacy and connectedness to nature in the relationship between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies. (2) Methods: In this cross-sectional study, nearly 800 mothers of children aged 3–6 were enrolled. General sociodemographic data, the Mindfulness in Parenting Questionnaire (MIPQ), the Creativity Assessment Packet (CAP), the Child–Parent Relationship Scale—Short Form (CPRS-SF), and the Connectedness to Nature Index—Parents of Preschool Children (CNI-PPC) were all included in the questionnaire survey. (3) Results: There were significant positive correlations among mindful parenting, parent–child intimacy, connectedness to nature, and children’s creative tendencies. Mindful parenting had a positive predictive effect on children’s creative tendencies. Parent–child intimacy played a mediating role between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies. Connectedness to nature played a mediating role between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies. The correlation between mindful parenting and children’s creative tendencies may be impacted by the chain mediation effects of parent–child intimacy and connectedness to nature. (4) Conclusions: By promoting parent–child intimacy and connectedness to nature, and by utilizing the chain mediating effects of both, mindful parenting positively impacted children’s creative tendencies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Understanding Scientific Creativity)
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11 pages, 434 KiB  
Article
Effects of Perceived Parent–Child Relationships and Self-Concept on Creative Personality among Middle School Students
by Hyesung Park and Sungyeun Kim
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14010058 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1108
Abstract
This study investigated the impact of perceived parent–child relationships on creative personality in middle school students according to self-concept, focusing on environmental (parent–child relationships) and individual (self-concept) factors that can influence these students’ creative personalities. To this end, this study verified the moderation [...] Read more.
This study investigated the impact of perceived parent–child relationships on creative personality in middle school students according to self-concept, focusing on environmental (parent–child relationships) and individual (self-concept) factors that can influence these students’ creative personalities. To this end, this study verified the moderation effect using sixth-year data (third year of middle school students) from the Seoul Longitudinal Educational Study 2010 Panel, utilizing SPSS 26.0 and the PROCESS macro. The results revealed that the self-concept of middle school students moderated the influence of parent–child relationships on creative personality. Specifically, it was found that as the level of self-concept increased above the average the positive relationship between parent–child relationships and creative personality strengthened. Based on the study’s findings, theoretical and practical suggestions for creating a home and educational environment to promote creativity during adolescence were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Understanding Scientific Creativity)
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19 pages, 1556 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Relationship between Academic Challenge Stress and Self-Rated Creativity of Graduate Students: Mediating Effects and Heterogeneity Analysis of Academic Self-Efficacy and Resilience
by Hao Yao, Shuzhen Chen and Ang Liu
J. Intell. 2023, 11(9), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence11090176 - 04 Sep 2023
Viewed by 2051
Abstract
In the 21st century, creativity is a core competence and key thinking quality. Researchers and educators have been interested in exploring the effects of different stressors on individual creativity for decades. Using structural equation modeling and quantile regression, this study investigated the relationship [...] Read more.
In the 21st century, creativity is a core competence and key thinking quality. Researchers and educators have been interested in exploring the effects of different stressors on individual creativity for decades. Using structural equation modeling and quantile regression, this study investigated the relationship between academic challenge stress and self-rated creativity of graduate students among 1210 Chinese graduate students. The study separately tested the mediating effect of resilience, the mediating effect of academic self-efficacy, and the chained mediating effect of both. This study analyzed the heterogeneity of the effects of academic challenge stress, academic self-efficacy, and resilience on self-rated creativity of different students. The research results showed that academic challenge stress had a direct positive effect on graduate students’ self-rated creativity. The mediating effect of resilience and academic self-efficacy and the chain mediating effect were established. The quantile regression revealed a decreasing marginal benefit of academic challenge stress and resilience for self-rated creativity and an inverted U-shaped relationship between academic self-efficacy and self-rated creativity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Understanding Scientific Creativity)
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18 pages, 2522 KiB  
Article
Meaning-Making in Ecology Education: Analysis of Students’ Multimodal Texts
by Hanna Wanselin, Kristina Danielsson and Susanne Wikman
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13050443 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1573
Abstract
Teaching and learning in ecology depend on multimodality, involving semiotic resources such as visual representations, subject-specific symbols, and written and spoken language. Furthermore, the ecology field involves complex processes and relationships, presenting student challenges. However, more research has yet to investigate how students [...] Read more.
Teaching and learning in ecology depend on multimodality, involving semiotic resources such as visual representations, subject-specific symbols, and written and spoken language. Furthermore, the ecology field involves complex processes and relationships, presenting student challenges. However, more research has yet to investigate how students design multimodal texts to represent complex biological processes. For a holistic understanding of ecology, it is crucial to understand different complex processes, such as the matter cycle, energy flow, decomposition, and their relations. Therefore, this study aims to, through multimodal text analysis based on systemic functional linguistics (SFL), identify how secondary students collectively present and combine such processes and how they position themselves through their textual choices. Results indicate that representing biological processes comprises several challenges for students. One way in which this is shown is the unclear use and meaning of arrows. Thereto, the students include various aspects uncommon in the field of ecology, for example, symbols inspired by comic books, values, and the role of humans, thereby relating ecosystems to their interests and everyday life. Implications for teaching are discussed, for instance, the importance of supporting students in terms of scientific content and how to represent it, which can be conducted through text discussions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Understanding Scientific Creativity)
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15 pages, 2620 KiB  
Article
Alpha ERS-ERD Pattern during Divergent and Convergent Thinking Depends on Individual Differences on Metacontrol
by Chunlei Liu, Yuhong Lin, Chaoqun Ye, Jiaqin Yang and Wenguang He
J. Intell. 2023, 11(4), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence11040074 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1648
Abstract
The role of metacontrol in creativity is theoretically assumed, but experimental evidence is still lacking. In this study, we investigated how metacontrol affects creativity from the perspective of individual differences. Sixty participants completed the metacontrol task, which was used to divide participants into [...] Read more.
The role of metacontrol in creativity is theoretically assumed, but experimental evidence is still lacking. In this study, we investigated how metacontrol affects creativity from the perspective of individual differences. Sixty participants completed the metacontrol task, which was used to divide participants into a high-metacontrol group (HMC) versus a low (LMC) group. Then, these participants performed the alternate uses task (AUT; divergent thinking) and the remote associates test (RAT; convergent thinking), while their EEG results were recorded continuously. Regarding their behavior, the HMC group showed superior creative performance in the AUT and RAT, compared with the LMC group. For the electrophysiology, the HMC group showed larger stimulus-locked P1 and P3 amplitudes than the LMC group. Furthermore, the HMC group exhibited smaller alpha desynchronization (ERD) than the LMC group at the initial stages of the AUT task, followed by a flexible switching between alpha synchronization and desynchronization (ERS-ERD) during the process of selective retention in the AUT. In addition, the HMC group evoked smaller alpha ERD during the initial retrieval and the backtracking process in the RAT, associated with cognitive control adaptability. The aforementioned results indicate that metacontrol reliably contributes to the idea generation process, and HMC individuals could flexibly adjust their cognitive control strategies according to the demand for creative idea generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Understanding Scientific Creativity)
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13 pages, 513 KiB  
Article
Childhood Maltreatment and Creativity among Chinese College Students: A Serial Mediation Model
by Wenfu Li, Shuai Zhang, Hao Lin, Keke Zhang, Xiaolong Zhang, Jingting Chen, Fangfang Xu and Chuanxin Liu
J. Intell. 2023, 11(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence11040058 - 24 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1730
Abstract
Creativity plays a very crucial impact on our cultural life and has also been important to the improvement of human civilization. Numerous studies have indicated that family circumstance plays an important role in the development of individual creativity. However, little is known about [...] Read more.
Creativity plays a very crucial impact on our cultural life and has also been important to the improvement of human civilization. Numerous studies have indicated that family circumstance plays an important role in the development of individual creativity. However, little is known about the mediating mechanisms underlying the association between childhood maltreatment and creativity. This study intended to explore the serial multiple mediation model in which undergraduates’ cognitive flexibility and self-efficacy were proposed to mediate the potential influence of childhood maltreatment on their creativity. Participants were 1069 undergraduates (573 males and 496 females, mean age was 20.57 ± 1.24 years ranging from 17 to 24) from a university in Shandong Province, China. Participants were required to complete an internet survey including the Short Form of Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-SF), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Cognitive Flexibility Inventory (CFI), and Williams Creativity Aptitude Test (WCAT). Serial multiple mediation analysis and the bootstrap method were used to investigate the mediation effects of cognitive flexibility and self-efficacy. The results showed that childhood maltreatment indirectly influenced undergraduates’ creativity through three indirect paths: childhood maltreatment→cognitive flexibility→creativity, childhood maltreatment→self-efficacy→creativity, and childhood maltreatment→cognitive flexibility→self-efficacy→creativity. The ratios of the total indirect effects and branch-indirect effects to the total effects were 92.73%, 34.61%, 35.68%, and 22.44%, respectively. These results indicated that cognitive flexibility and self-efficacy could completely mediate the potential impact of childhood maltreatment on individuals creativity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Understanding Scientific Creativity)
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