Topic Editors

Dr. Munir Mawassi
The Plant Pathology Department, Agricultural Research Organization, 50250 Bet-Dagan, Israel
A. N. Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Moscow State University, 11992 Moscow, Russia

Plant Virus

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 July 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 October 2023)
Viewed by
22277

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant viruses are widespread worldwide. Common viruses include mosaic, leaf curl, poxvirus, dwarf, leaf roll, and bushy stunt virus. Since plant viruses are not only one of the main threats to crop growth but also cause important economic losses in many agronomic systems, for sustainable and healthy agricultural production, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of interaction between plants and viruses in depth, as it can lay a solid foundation for future plant defense against viruses and the development of viral disease management strategies. This Topic will focus on but not be limited to viral disease detection, plant–virus interactions (the effect of virus infections on fruit and vegetables) and plant virus resistance. We welcome well-prepared manuscripts of original research, review articles, and short communications.

Dr. Munir Mawassi
Prof. Dr. Sergey Morozov
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • plant–virus interactions
  • plant virology
  • plant virus resistance
  • molecular virology
  • virus infection
  • virus infections on fruit

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 4.9 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 6.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600
Crops
crops
- - 2021 30.5 Days CHF 1000
Plants
plants
4.5 6.5 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700
Viruses
viruses
4.7 7.3 2009 13.8 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (10 papers)

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15 pages, 12015 KiB  
Article
Fine Structure of Plasmodesmata-Associated Membrane Bodies Formed by Viral Movement Protein
by Anastasia K. Atabekova, Sergei A. Golyshev, Alexander A. Lezzhov, Boris I. Skulachev, Andrey V. Moiseenko, Daria M. Yastrebova, Nadezda V. Andrianova, Ilya D. Solovyev, Alexander P. Savitsky, Sergey Y. Morozov and Andrey G. Solovyev
Plants 2023, 12(24), 4100; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12244100 - 7 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1167
Abstract
Cell-to-cell transport of plant viruses through plasmodesmata (PD) requires viral movement proteins (MPs) often associated with cell membranes. The genome of the Hibiscus green spot virus encodes two MPs, BMB1 and BMB2, which enable virus cell-to-cell transport. BMB2 is known to localize to [...] Read more.
Cell-to-cell transport of plant viruses through plasmodesmata (PD) requires viral movement proteins (MPs) often associated with cell membranes. The genome of the Hibiscus green spot virus encodes two MPs, BMB1 and BMB2, which enable virus cell-to-cell transport. BMB2 is known to localize to PD-associated membrane bodies (PAMBs), which are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structures, and to direct BMB1 to PAMBs. This paper reports the fine structure of PAMBs. Immunogold labeling confirms the previously observed localization of BMB1 and BMB2 to PAMBs. EM tomography data show that the ER-derived structures in PAMBs are mostly cisterns interconnected by numerous intermembrane contacts that likely stabilize PAMBs. These contacts predominantly involve the rims of the cisterns rather than their flat surfaces. Using FRET-FLIM (Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores detected by fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy) and chemical cross-linking, BMB2 is shown to self-interact and form high-molecular-weight complexes. As BMB2 has been shown to have an affinity for highly curved membranes at cisternal rims, the interaction of BMB2 molecules located at rims of adjacent cisterns is suggested to be involved in the formation of intermembrane contacts in PAMBs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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12 pages, 6312 KiB  
Article
Turnip Yellows Virus Field Infection in Oilseed Rape: Does It Impact the Yield and Quality?
by Ramóna Vizi, József Kiss, György Turóczi, Nóra Dobra and Zoltán Pálinkás
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2404; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092404 - 18 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1262
Abstract
Brassica napus L., winter oilseed rape (OSR), is a major crop worldwide, with a wide range of uses and high profitability. Viruses, such as turnip yellows virus (TuYV), are becoming increasingly important, and in certain years, they can cause significant infestations in OSR. [...] Read more.
Brassica napus L., winter oilseed rape (OSR), is a major crop worldwide, with a wide range of uses and high profitability. Viruses, such as turnip yellows virus (TuYV), are becoming increasingly important, and in certain years, they can cause significant infestations in OSR. It is difficult to detect the presence of the virus during visual field inspections, as the symptoms it causes can be confused with either those caused by abiotic factors (e.g., low winter temperature, soil compaction, nutrient deficiencies, etc.) or by other viruses. The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility of four commercial hybrids of oilseed rape to TuYV in Hungary and to determine the effect of the virus on phenotypic and yield parameters. The results showed that infection with the TuYV can be significant in OSR in some growing seasons. It was found that the appearance of visual symptoms (e.g., anthocyanin leaves) does not always confirm the presence of the virus (based on the ELISA (enzyme-linked immuno assay)), and it does not always detect a negative effect of TuYV on all phenotypic and yield parameters of the tested hybrids based on the results in one growing season. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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19 pages, 1374 KiB  
Review
Unraveling the Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Symptom Development in Plants
by Tong Jiang and Tao Zhou
Plants 2023, 12(15), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12152830 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2923
Abstract
Plant viruses, as obligate intracellular parasites, induce significant changes in the cellular physiology of host cells to facilitate their multiplication. These alterations often lead to the development of symptoms that interfere with normal growth and development, causing USD 60 billion worth of losses [...] Read more.
Plant viruses, as obligate intracellular parasites, induce significant changes in the cellular physiology of host cells to facilitate their multiplication. These alterations often lead to the development of symptoms that interfere with normal growth and development, causing USD 60 billion worth of losses per year, worldwide, in both agricultural and horticultural crops. However, existing literature often lacks a clear and concise presentation of the key information regarding the mechanisms underlying plant virus-induced symptoms. To address this, we conducted a comprehensive review to highlight the crucial interactions between plant viruses and host factors, discussing key genes that increase viral virulence and their roles in influencing cellular processes such as dysfunction of chloroplast proteins, hormone manipulation, reactive oxidative species accumulation, and cell cycle control, which are critical for symptom development. Moreover, we explore the alterations in host metabolism and gene expression that are associated with virus-induced symptoms. In addition, the influence of environmental factors on virus-induced symptom development is discussed. By integrating these various aspects, this review provides valuable insights into the complex mechanisms underlying virus-induced symptoms in plants, and emphasizes the urgency of addressing viral diseases to ensure sustainable agriculture and food production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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13 pages, 308 KiB  
Review
Integrating Community Ecology into Models of Vector-Borne Virus Transmission
by Benjamin W. Lee, Liesl C. Oeller and David W. Crowder
Plants 2023, 12(12), 2335; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12122335 - 15 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1084
Abstract
Vector-borne plant viruses are a diverse and dynamic threat to agriculture with hundreds of economically damaging viruses and insect vector species. Mathematical models have greatly increased our understanding of how alterations of vector life history and host–vector–pathogen interactions can affect virus transmission. However, [...] Read more.
Vector-borne plant viruses are a diverse and dynamic threat to agriculture with hundreds of economically damaging viruses and insect vector species. Mathematical models have greatly increased our understanding of how alterations of vector life history and host–vector–pathogen interactions can affect virus transmission. However, insect vectors also interact with species such as predators and competitors in food webs, and these interactions affect vector population size and behaviors in ways that mediate virus transmission. Studies assessing how species’ interactions affect vector-borne pathogen transmission are limited in both number and scale, hampering the development of models that appropriately capture community-level effects on virus prevalence. Here, we review vector traits and community factors that affect virus transmission, explore the existing models of vector-borne virus transmission and areas where the principles of community ecology could improve the models and management, and finally evaluate virus transmission in agricultural systems. We conclude that models have expanded our understanding of disease dynamics through simulations of transmission but are limited in their ability to reflect the complexity of ecological interactions in real systems. We also document a need for experiments in agroecosystems, where the high availability of historical and remote-sensing data could serve to validate and improve vector-borne virus transmission models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
12 pages, 2259 KiB  
Article
Variation in Symptom Development and Infectivity of Banana Bunchy Top Disease among Four Cultivars of Musa sp.
by Modeste Chabi, Anicet Gbèblonoudo Dassou, Hubert Adoukonou-Sagbadja, John Thomas and Aman Bonaventure Omondi
Crops 2023, 3(2), 158-169; https://doi.org/10.3390/crops3020016 - 9 May 2023
Viewed by 2605
Abstract
Banana bunchy top disease (BBTD) is an invasive viral disease spreading in Africa. It is transmitted by banana aphids and infected planting material, causing production losses. Clean seeds and timely eradication of diseased plants are effective tools in BBTD management. These depend on [...] Read more.
Banana bunchy top disease (BBTD) is an invasive viral disease spreading in Africa. It is transmitted by banana aphids and infected planting material, causing production losses. Clean seeds and timely eradication of diseased plants are effective tools in BBTD management. These depend on timely disease detection. We assessed the relationship between symptom expression and infectivity of the virus in four cultivars of banana. Plantlets from four cultivars, ‘FHIA 25’; ‘Aloga’; ‘Ebenga’ and ‘Sotoumon’, were exposed to viruliferous aphids and monitored for symptom expression. They were also tested as sources for virus transmission fortnightly by allowing non-viruliferous aphids acquisition access prior to transfer to healthy test plants. The time required to show symptoms and the symptom expression were compared, and infection tested by PCR. Disease expression varied from four weeks in ‘FHIA 25’ to fifteen in ‘Sotoumon’. Only the symptomatic leaves tested positive and could act as infection sources. Overall, ‘FHIA 25’ was the most susceptible cultivar, while ‘Sotoumon’ was the least susceptible and most rapidly expressive of BBTD, yet there was no difference in the leaf emergence rate between the cultivars. These results present important aspects of BBTD control and the safety of planting materials that should be tested in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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16 pages, 2890 KiB  
Article
Seed Transmission of Begomoviruses: A Potential Threat for Bitter Gourd Cultivation
by Ravisankar Gomathi Devi, Chinnaraj Jothika, Arjunan Sankari, Sethuraman Lakshmi, Varagur Ganesan Malathi and Perumal Renukadevi
Plants 2023, 12(6), 1396; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12061396 - 21 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2819
Abstract
Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.), one of the valued vegetable crops in India, is severely affected by yellow mosaic disease caused by two begomoviruses, tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) and bitter gourd yellow mosaic virus (BgYMV). The symptoms are yellowing, [...] Read more.
Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.), one of the valued vegetable crops in India, is severely affected by yellow mosaic disease caused by two begomoviruses, tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) and bitter gourd yellow mosaic virus (BgYMV). The symptoms are yellowing, distortion of leaf, puckering, and malformed fruits. Increased incidence of the disease and appearance of symptoms even in young emerging seedling stage were suggestive of seed transmission of the viruses, which was examined in detail. To study the seed transmission, two sources—seeds of elite hybrids H1, H2, H3, H4, and Co1 procured from a seed market; and seeds from infected plants in the farmer’s field were tested. Detection of the virus by DAS-ELISA using polyclonal antibody indicated embryo infection up to 63%, 26%, 20%, and 10% in hybrids H1, H2, H3, and H4, respectively, for market-procured seeds. In PCR analysis with primers specific for ToLCNDV and BgYMV, infection by ToLCNDV was as high as 76% and mixed infection was 24%. In contrast, in seeds derived from field-infected plants, the percentage detection was less. Grow-out tests with market-procured seeds revealed no transmission for BgYMV compared with 5% transmission for ToLCNDV. Whether seed-borne inocula could serve as an inoculum for new infection in a field and further progress of the disease was investigated in a microplot study. The study clearly revealed variation in seed transmission between different sources, lots, cultivars, and viruses. The virus present in symptomatic and asymptomatic plants was easily transmitted by whitefly. In another microplot experiment, the potential of seed-borne virus as inoculum was proved. There was 43.3% initial seed transmission in the microplot, increasing to 70% after release of 60 whiteflies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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18 pages, 6305 KiB  
Communication
Uncovering Plant Virus Species Forming Novel Provisional Taxonomic Units Related to the Family Benyviridae
by Andrey G. Solovyev and Sergey Y. Morozov
Viruses 2022, 14(12), 2680; https://doi.org/10.3390/v14122680 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1751
Abstract
Based on analyses of recent open-source data, this paper describes novel horizons in the diversity and taxonomy of beny-like viruses infecting hosts of the plant kingdom (Plantae or Archaeplastida). First, our data expand the known host range of the family Benyviridae to include [...] Read more.
Based on analyses of recent open-source data, this paper describes novel horizons in the diversity and taxonomy of beny-like viruses infecting hosts of the plant kingdom (Plantae or Archaeplastida). First, our data expand the known host range of the family Benyviridae to include red algae. Second, our phylogenetic analysis suggests that the evolution of this virus family may have involved cross-kingdom host change events and gene recombination/exchanges between distant taxa. Third, the identification of gene blocks encoding known movement proteins in beny-like RNA viruses infecting non-vascular plants confirms other evidence that plant virus genomic RNAs may have acquired movement proteins simultaneously or even prior to the evolutionary emergence of the plant vascular system. Fourth, novel data on plant virus diversity highlight that molecular evolution gave rise to numerous provisional species of land-plant-infecting viruses, which encode no known potential movement genetic systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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15 pages, 1906 KiB  
Article
Insight into Population Structure and Evolutionary Analysis of the Emerging Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus
by Ali Çelik, Sevgi Coşkan, Ali Ferhan Morca, Adyatma Irawan Santosa and Davoud Koolivand
Plants 2022, 11(23), 3279; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11233279 - 28 Nov 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2718
Abstract
A total of 112 symptomatic tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and 83 symptomatic pepper (Capsicum spp.) samples were collected in Ankara, Eskişehir, Bartın, and Zonguldak provinces of Turkey during 2020–2021. Six tomatoes and one pepper sample (3.6%) tested positive for tomato brown [...] Read more.
A total of 112 symptomatic tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and 83 symptomatic pepper (Capsicum spp.) samples were collected in Ankara, Eskişehir, Bartın, and Zonguldak provinces of Turkey during 2020–2021. Six tomatoes and one pepper sample (3.6%) tested positive for tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV, genus Tobamovirus) infection by DAS-ELISA and RT-PCR. ToBRFV-positive tomato and pepper plants were removed from greenhouses as soon as possible, and the greenhouses and tools were disinfected completely. Phylogenetic analysis on the complete CP sequences suggested the clustering of 178 GenBank isolates and 7 novel isolates into three groups. A study using DnaSP software showed very low genetic variation among current global ToBRFV isolates. All four ORFs of the virus genome were under strong negative evolutionary constraints, with a ω value range of 0.0869–0.2066. However, three neutrality tests indicated that most populations of the newly identified ToBRFV are currently expanding by assigning statistically significant negative values to them. The very low FST values (0.25 or less) obtained by all comparisons of the isolates from Europe, the Middle East, China, and America concluded that there is no clear genetic separation among currently known isolates from different geographic origins. The divergence time of ToBRFV was estimated to be in the middle of the course of the evolution of 11 tested tobamoviruses. The time to the most recent common ancestors (TMRCAs) of ToBRFV were calculated to be 0.8 and 1.87 with the genetically closest members of Tobamovirus. The results of this study could improve our understanding on the population structure of the emerging ToBRFV. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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10 pages, 732 KiB  
Article
The Molecular Characterization of a New Prunus-Infecting Cheravirus and Complete Genome Sequence of Stocky Prune Virus
by Maryam Khalili, Thierry Candresse, Yoann Brans, Chantal Faure, Jean-Marc Audergon, Véronique Decroocq, Guillaume Roch and Armelle Marais
Viruses 2022, 14(11), 2325; https://doi.org/10.3390/v14112325 - 23 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1727
Abstract
As part of a virome characterization of Prunus species, a novel cheravirus was discovered in two wild species, Prunus brigantina and P. mahaleb, and in an apricot (P. armeniaca) accession. The sequence of the two genomic RNAs was completed for [...] Read more.
As part of a virome characterization of Prunus species, a novel cheravirus was discovered in two wild species, Prunus brigantina and P. mahaleb, and in an apricot (P. armeniaca) accession. The sequence of the two genomic RNAs was completed for two isolates. The Pro-Pol conserved region showed 86% amino acid (aa) identity with the corresponding region of trillium govanianum cheravirus (TgCV), a tentative Cheravirus member, whereas the combined coat proteins (CPs) shared only 40% aa identity with TgCV CPs, well below the species demarcation threshold for the genus. This suggests that the new virus should be considered a new species for which the name alpine wild prunus virus (AWPV) is proposed. In parallel, the complete genome sequence of stocky prune virus (StPV), a poorly known cheravirus for which only partial sequences were available, was determined. A phylogenetic analysis showed that AWPV, TgCV and StPV form a distinct cluster, away from other cheraviruses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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22 pages, 3455 KiB  
Article
Differential Expression of Genes between a Tolerant and a Susceptible Maize Line in Response to a Sugarcane Mosaic Virus Infection
by Gustavo Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo Vargas-Mejía and Laura Silva-Rosales
Viruses 2022, 14(8), 1803; https://doi.org/10.3390/v14081803 - 17 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2070
Abstract
To uncover novel genes associated with the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) response, we used RNA-Seq data to analyze differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and transcript expression pattern clusters between a tolerant/resistant (CI-RL1) and a susceptible (B73) line, in addition to the F1 progeny (CI-RL1xB73). [...] Read more.
To uncover novel genes associated with the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) response, we used RNA-Seq data to analyze differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and transcript expression pattern clusters between a tolerant/resistant (CI-RL1) and a susceptible (B73) line, in addition to the F1 progeny (CI-RL1xB73). A Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment of DEGs led us to propose three genes possibly associated with the CI-RL1 response: a heat shock 90-2 protein and two ABC transporters. Through a clustering analysis of the transcript expression patterns (CTEPs), we identified two genes putatively involved in viral systemic spread: the maize homologs to the PIEZO channel (ZmPiezo) and to the Potyvirus VPg Interacting Protein 1 (ZmPVIP1). We also observed the complex behavior of the maize eukaryotic factors ZmeIF4E and Zm-elfa (involved in translation), homologs to eIF4E and eEF1α in A. thaliana. Together, the DEG and CTEPs results lead us to suggest that the tolerant/resistant CI-RL1 response to the SCMV encompasses the action of diverse genes and, for the first time, that maize translation factors are associated with viral interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Virus)
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