Topic Editors

Distributed Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA

Solving Grid Challenges with Combined Transmission and Distribution System Models

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 October 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 January 2024)
Viewed by
2436

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The complexity of the electric power grid, the largest machine ever built, is rapidly increasing as the application of renewable generators, storage devices, smart grid devices, new measurement systems, and electric vehicles grows, bringing operational, stability, and security challenges. Transmission operators require increased visibility in distribution operations. Distribution operations and controls must support the transmission system needs. Defending against cyber-attacks poses unprecedented challenges. Large-scale models, models that span from transmission to secondary distribution, models of a size that has not been solved to date, are needed to address these challenges. Analysis of such large-scale models, from design to real-time operations, requires new analysis approaches, approaches that work across the wide variety of topologies, approaches that solve systems with tens of millions of nodes, approaches that support distributed computations, and approaches that converge on stiff problems. Topics of interest in the Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The modeling and analysis of transmission, substations, primary distribution, and secondary distribution together in one model, referred to as an Integrated System Model; 
  • Analysis approaches to solving Integrated System Models; 
  • Analyses where Integrated System Models from two or more utilities are combined into a multi-utility Integrated System Model; 
  • Applications of Integrated System Models in:
    • Forecasting renewable generation and net load;
    • Energy independence studies;
    • Energy trading studies;
    • Real-time monitoring and control;
    • Voltage stability analysis;
    • Defending against cyber-attacks;
    • Multi-domain modeling;
    • Cloud-computing.
Dr. Bilal A. Bhatti
Prof. Dr. Robert P. Broadwater
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • co-simulation
  • hybrid systems
  • integrated system modeling

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400
Sensors
sensors
3.9 6.8 2001 17 Days CHF 2600
Electronics
electronics
2.9 4.7 2012 15.6 Days CHF 2400
Sci
sci
- 3.1 2019 47.7 Days CHF 1200

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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20 pages, 2241 KiB  
Review
Single-Wire Transmission Methods: Justification of a Single-Wire Resonant Power Transmission System
Energies 2023, 16(13), 5089; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16135089 - 30 Jun 2023
Viewed by 822
Abstract
Electricity supply as well as the provision of other forms of resources is one of the foundations of efficient agriculture. However, due to the reduction in the number of people living in rural settlements, there have been a large number of power lines [...] Read more.
Electricity supply as well as the provision of other forms of resources is one of the foundations of efficient agriculture. However, due to the reduction in the number of people living in rural settlements, there have been a large number of power lines with considerable lengths supplying small loads, hence resulting in an increase in power supply efficiency. A single-wire power transmission is an option for reducing the capital cost of power line construction by utilizing fewer conductors and fittings and lighter power transmission towers while lowering operational expenses. This paper considers the possible methods for single-wire energy transmission via the analysis of information sources such as Yandex and Google search engines; Scopus and Google Scholar scientific databases; and Cyber Leninka, eLIBRARY.ru, Elsevier, Springer, IEEE Xplore, and IGI Global electronic libraries. The conducted review revealed four alternatives: a single-wire earth return (SWER) system, a single-wire balanced line (B-Line), resonant wireless power transmission (SWPT) system, and a resonant single-wire power transmission system. The latter is of particular interest due to the lack of comprehensive and detailed information describing this technology, although it has distinct characteristics because of the peculiarities of the resonant mode of operation. The paper provides a comprehensive review of all existing published materials on the topic of “resonant systems for the transmission of electrical energy along a single wire”. The study covers the history of development and the structure of this system; describes its features, advantages, and the problems of using it; and the experience and fields of its application. Full article
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16 pages, 2976 KiB  
Article
Transmission and Distribution Real-Time Analysis Software for Monitoring and Control: Design and Simulation Testing
Energies 2023, 16(10), 4113; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16104113 - 16 May 2023
Viewed by 794
Abstract
The US electric grid is facing operational, stability, and security challenges. Transmission system operators need some measure of visibility into distribution system renewable generation. Distribution system generation needs to support transmission system voltage. The grid is experiencing an expansion in measurement systems. How [...] Read more.
The US electric grid is facing operational, stability, and security challenges. Transmission system operators need some measure of visibility into distribution system renewable generation. Distribution system generation needs to support transmission system voltage. The grid is experiencing an expansion in measurement systems. How to take full advantage of this expansion and defend against attacks, both cyber and physical, poses additional challenges. This paper introduces software designed to meet these challenges. At the center of the software is an Integrated System Model (ISM) that spans from transmission to secondary distribution. The ISM is employed in real-time abnormality detection, voltage stability forecasting, and multi-mode control. The software architecture along with selected analysis modules is presented. Testing results are presented for: 1—attacks on utility infrastructure; 2—energy savings from optimal control; 3—distribution system control response during a low voltage transmission system event; 4—cyber-attacks on PV inverters, where physical inverters are used in hardware-in-the-simulation-loop studies. Contributions of this work include real-time analysis that spans from three-phase transmission through secondary distribution; an approach for detecting abnormalities that employs measurements from three independent measurement systems; and a multi-mode distribution system control that responds to cyber-attacks, physical attacks, equipment failures, and transmission system needs. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Graph Trace Analysis Based, Time-Series, Optimal Power Flow for Hierarchical, Multi-mode, Coordinated Control of Transmission and Distribution Systems
Authors: Abhineet Parchure, Murat Dilek, Robert Broadwater.
Affiliation: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Tech
Abstract: With increasing proliferation of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and Electric Vehicles (EVs), the electric grid can experience rapid variations in system state. Unmanaged, these variations can lead to large numbers of equipment operations, and in some cases, oscillatory behavior in smart inverters and other distribution control assets. The impacts of an active distribution grid extend to transmission system voltage stability as well. As a result, distribution system operations need to be informed by transmission voltage stability needs. Distribution operations also need to account for time-series coordination of many distributed, controllable assets. A hierarchical, multi-mode coordinated control design is described here. In the hierarchical control, the transmission system sends desired modes of control to the distribution system. Examples of distribution system control modes are: Support transmission system voltage; Cyber-attack; Abnormal operation; Maximize Conservation Voltage Reduction and Minimize Losses. Associated with each control mode are time-varying, desired feeder voltage profiles. A time-series, optimal power flow is used to achieve the time-varying, distribution system voltage profiles. The matrix-free, Graph Trace Analysis algorithm used to implement the optimal power flow is described. Case studies for two systems are presented.

Title: Multi-Utility Integrated System Model Combined with New York State Mesonet for Forecasting of Load, DER Generation, and Outages
Authors: Nick Bassill, Kara Sulia, Danling Cheng, Robert Broadwater, JP Laglenne, Ian Smith, Anthony Anchante, Christopher Cheng
Affiliation: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Tech
Abstract: Distributed Energy Resource (DER) generation increases variations in power system flows, including the variation of power flows among utilities. As a result of the increasing DER penetration, transmission operators need increased visibility into distribution system DER operations. In many locations around the world, such as New York State, the severity of storms is increasing, potentially causing increased and longer duration outages. Under both blue-sky day and storm conditions, system operators require information on the net load. Here, Integrated System Models (ISMs) from neighboring utilities are combined into a single model consisting of approximately 1.5 million nodes. That is, a multi-utility ISM is employed. This ISM is integrated with weather measurements from the New York State Mesonet, a distributed weather measurement system. To enhance PV generation forecasting, irradiance meters with a one-second sample rate are added and installed on secondary poles surrounding large PV generation sites. The multi-utility ISM and Mesonet measurements are used to provide short-term and intermediate-term forecasts of the native load, PV generation, net load, and outages for the combined utilities. Based on the load and generation forecasts and current outages, a Graph Trace Analysis-based, time-series power flow is used to forecast the multi-utility operations.

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