Topic Editors

Department of Surgical Sciences, CIR Dental School, University of Turin, Via Nizza 230, 10126 Turin, Italy
Prof. Dr. Stefano Carossa
Department of Surgical Sciences, CIR Dental School, University of Turin, Via Nizza 230, 10126 Turin, Italy
National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor Street, No. 405A, P.O. Box MG 07, 077125 Magurele, Romania

Advances in Materials and Concepts in Fixed Prosthodontics and Implant Therapy

Abstract submission deadline
20 June 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
Viewed by
18989

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there has been a widespread introduction of novel technologies, materials, and digital workflows that have contributed to the advancement of prosthodontics treatments and implant therapies. Many of these materials and technologies have undoubtedly led to new strategies and approaches for the daily rehabilitation of patients requiring fixed prosthodontics on both natural teeth and implants. However, further research is required to investigate and confirm all the advantages, as well as limitations, that these new technologies may present. The present topic aims to collect and disseminate original research papers, reviews, and technical reports on the state of the art in the field of fixed prosthodontics and implant therapy. Potential fields include but are not limited to the following:

  • Fixed prosthodontics on natural teeth;
  • Implant prosthodontics;
  • CAD/CAM materials;
  • 3D-printed materials;
  • Implant surfaces;
  • Implant morphologies;
  • Digital work flows;
  • Digital impressions;
  • Implant surgery;
  • Digital dentistry.

Dr. Massimo Carossa
Prof. Dr. Stefano Carossa
Dr. Simona Liliana Iconaru
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • dental implants
  • CAD/CAM materials
  • 3D-printed materials
  • fixed prosthodontics
  • dental prosthesis
  • digital dentistry

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Coatings
coatings
3.4 4.7 2011 13.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Dentistry Journal
dentistry
2.6 4.0 2013 27.8 Days CHF 2000 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Materials
materials
3.4 5.2 2008 13.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Polymers
polymers
5.0 6.6 2009 13.7 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (12 papers)

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11 pages, 5730 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Effect of Different Insertion Speeds and Torques on Implant Placement Condition and Removal Torque in Polyurethane Dense D1 Bone Model
by Zeynep Dilan Orhan and Levent Ciğerim
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1361; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101361 - 10 May 2024
Viewed by 296
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different insertion speeds at eight different insertion torque values ranging from 25 to 60 during implantation in a dense polyurethane (PU) D1 bone model on the placement condition and removal torque [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different insertion speeds at eight different insertion torque values ranging from 25 to 60 during implantation in a dense polyurethane (PU) D1 bone model on the placement condition and removal torque of dental implants. In this study, 50 pcf single-layer PU plates were used. In the study, a total of 320 implant sockets were divided into two groups, Group 1 (30 rpm) and Group 2 (50 rpm), in terms of insertion speed. Group 1 and Group 2 were divided into eight subgroups with 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 torques. There were 20 implant sockets in each subgroup. During the implantations, the implant placement condition and removal torque values were assessed. There was a statistically significant difference between the 30 and 50 rpm groups in terms of overall implant placement condition (p < 0.01). It was found that the removal torque values at 50 rpm were statistically significantly higher than those at 30 rpm (p < 0.01). This study showed that in dense D1 bone, the minimum parameters at which all implants could be placed at the bone level were 50 torque at 30 rpm and 40 torque at 50 rpm. Full article
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11 pages, 2113 KiB  
Article
A New Approach to Implant Stability Using a Flexible Synthetic Silicate-Additive Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate-Poly(D,L-lactide-co-caprolactone) Bone Graft: An In Vitro Study
by Zeynep Dilan Orhan and Levent Ciğerim
Polymers 2024, 16(8), 1101; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16081101 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 474
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a flexible synthetic polymer bone graft to provide implant stability during implant placement in a dense cortical bone model. In the control group (Group 1), sockets were prepared on polyurethane blocks according [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a flexible synthetic polymer bone graft to provide implant stability during implant placement in a dense cortical bone model. In the control group (Group 1), sockets were prepared on polyurethane blocks according to the standard implant socket drilling protocol; both oversizing and deepening were applied in Group 2; and only oversizing was applied in Group 3. In Groups 2 and 3, flexible synthetic polymer bone grafts were placed in the sockets prior to implant placement. The implants were placed at the bone level in all groups. The highest torque value obtained was recorded as the insertion torque. In this study, 75 implant sites were included across three groups. The torque values of the implants in the control group were significantly higher than those of the implants with the oversized and deepened sockets and the oversized-only sockets (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). The torque values of the implants with the oversized and deepened sockets were significantly higher than those of the implants with the oversized-only sockets (p < 0.01). In this study, a flexible synthetic polymer bone graft was shown to be effective in achieving implant stability in the management of implants where there has been a loss of primary stability. Full article
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13 pages, 1751 KiB  
Article
Flexural Strength and Morphological Study of Different Multilayer Zirconia Dental Materials
by Andrea Labetić, Teodoro Klaser, Željko Skoko, Marko Jakovac and Mark Žic
Materials 2024, 17(5), 1143; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17051143 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 770
Abstract
Nowadays, yttria (Y3+)-stabilized ZrO2 (Y-TZP) is the most commonly used material in dental prosthetics. Y-TZP dental ceramics are mainly stabilized via the addition of 3 mol% yttrium oxide (Y2O3). These ceramics exhibit excellent mechanical properties, including [...] Read more.
Nowadays, yttria (Y3+)-stabilized ZrO2 (Y-TZP) is the most commonly used material in dental prosthetics. Y-TZP dental ceramics are mainly stabilized via the addition of 3 mol% yttrium oxide (Y2O3). These ceramics exhibit excellent mechanical properties, including high flexural strength, fracture toughness, elastic modulus, etc. Some manufacturers have recently introduced a new class of dental materials with multilayer composition with the aim of combining the advantages of adding more or less Y2O3 to the ceramic composition in one Y-TZP material. The flexural strength values of multilayer Y-TZP may vary depending on the dimensions of the specimen, layer distributions, and especially the layer exposed on the maximum tension side, i.e., loading configuration. Although previous studies have examined the flexural strength of separate Y-TZP layers, capturing the flexural strength of multilayer Y-TZP is still challenging. However, one should keep in mind that multilayer flexural strength is important for clinical indications. The objective of this study is to compare the flexural strength of three distinct multilayer translucent Y-TZP materials made up of layers with different Y3+ contents. Rectangular samples (2 mm × 2 mm × 16 mm) were prepared from CAD/CAM discs using the milling machine Programill PM7 (Ivoclar Vivadent AG). Milled bars were tested for flexural strength in a three-point bending test (ISO 6872:2015) using a universal testing machine (Inspekt Duo 5kN; Hegewald & Peschke, Nossen, Germany) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Representative samples of each type of material were selected for quantitative and qualitative analysis of the microstructure. Representative samples of each type of material were selected for structural, mechanical, and microstructural analyses. Full article
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15 pages, 3155 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of the Structural Weights of Fixed Prostheses of Zirconium Dioxide, Metal Ceramic, PMMA and 3DPP Printing Resin—Mechanical Implications
by Cristian Abad-Coronel, David Vélez Chimbo, Billy Lupú, Miguel Pacurucu, Marco V. Fárez and Jorge I. Fajardo
Dent. J. 2023, 11(11), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11110249 - 26 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2208
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical implications of four-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of (1) monolithic zirconium dioxide (ZR O2), (2) polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), (3) metal ceramic (PFM) and (4) impression resin (3DPP). Methods: Four groups were [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical implications of four-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of (1) monolithic zirconium dioxide (ZR O2), (2) polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), (3) metal ceramic (PFM) and (4) impression resin (3DPP). Methods: Four groups were studied with eight samples for each material (n: 32). Each structure was weighed, subjected to compressive tests and analyzed using 3D FEA. Results: PMMA presented the lowest structural weight (1.33 g), followed by 3DPP (1.98 g), ZR O2 (6.34 g) and PFM (6.44 g). In fracture tests, PMMA presented a compressive strength of 2104.73 N and a tension of 351.752 MPa; followed by PFM, with a strength of 1361.48 N and a tension of 227.521 MPa; ZR O2, with a strength of 1107.63 N and a tension of 185.098 MPa; and 3DPP, with a strength of 1000.88 N and a tension of 143.916 MPa. According to 3D FEA, 3DPP presented the lowest degree of deformation (0.001 mm), followed by PFM (0.011 mm), ZR O2 (0.168 mm) and PMMA (1.035 mm). Conclusions: The weights of the materials did not have a direct influence on the mean values obtained for strength, stress or strain. Since the performance was related to the tension and forces supported by the structures in critical zones, the importance of considering design factors is clear. In vitro and 3D FEA assays allowed us to simulate different scenarios for the mechanical properties of certain materials before evaluating them clinically. Thus, they can generate predictions that would allow for the design of a better research methodology in future clinical trials. Full article
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25 pages, 887 KiB  
Review
Biomechanical Implications of Mandibular Flexion on Implant-Supported Full-Arch Rehabilitations: A Systematic Literature Review
by Mario Caggiano, Francesco D’Ambrosio, Alfonso Acerra, David Giudice and Francesco Giordano
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(16), 5302; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12165302 - 15 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1229
Abstract
Background: Mandibular flexion (MF) is a complex biomechanical phenomenon, which involves a deformation of the mandible, due mainly to the contraction of the masticatory muscles, and it can have numerous clinical effects. The deformation of the lower jaw caused by mandibular flexion is [...] Read more.
Background: Mandibular flexion (MF) is a complex biomechanical phenomenon, which involves a deformation of the mandible, due mainly to the contraction of the masticatory muscles, and it can have numerous clinical effects. The deformation of the lower jaw caused by mandibular flexion is generally very small, and it is often overlooked and considered irrelevant from a clinical point of view by many authors; however, it should be important to remember that median mandibular flexure (MMF) has a multifactorial aetiology. The main aim of the current systematic review is to highlight the different factors that can increase MF in order to help clinicians identify patients to whom they should pay more attention. As a secondary outcome, we wanted to analyse the preventive measures and suitable techniques to be adopted to minimise the negative effects of this phenomenon on oral fixed rehabilitations. Methods: The review, which was carried out in accordance with the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses” (PRISMA) flowchart, was recorded in the “International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews” (PROSPERO). As research questions, “Patient/Population, Intervention, Comparison and Outcomes” (PICO) questions were employed. Using the ROBINS-I technique, the risk of bias in non-randomised clinical studies was evaluated. Results: The initial electronic search identified over 1300 potential articles, of which 54 studies were included in this systematic review. Information regarding the relationship between MF and individual factors, mandibular movements, impression taking, and fixed rehabilitations were obtained. Conclusions: The studies included in this systematic review showed that MF is greater during protrusive movements, in the posterior areas of the lower jaw, and in patients with brachial facial type, greater jaw length; small gonial angle; and less density, length, and bone surface of the symphysis. The biomechanical effects of mandibular flexion on fixed restorations are debated. Prospective clinical and radiological observational studies should be conducted to evaluate the potential short-, medium-, and long-term consequences of MF. Full article
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7 pages, 263 KiB  
Communication
Long-Term Effect of Nanosized Boric Acid Powder on Optical Properties of Polymer Infiltrated Ceramic CAD-CAM Material
by Rafat Sasany, Tan Fırat Eyüboğlu and Mutlu Özcan
Coatings 2023, 13(3), 483; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13030483 - 21 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1240
Abstract
The current study investigated the effect of boric acid (H3BO3) nanosized powder on the optical properties of a Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) polymer infiltrated ceramic material. Specimens (n = 60), (15 × 8 × 1.5 mm [...] Read more.
The current study investigated the effect of boric acid (H3BO3) nanosized powder on the optical properties of a Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) polymer infiltrated ceramic material. Specimens (n = 60), (15 × 8 × 1.5 mm3) were fabricated from a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PINC) (Vita Enamic, Vita Zahnfabrik, VITA-shade scale A2). Boric acid (B) nano powder was applied to Vita Enamic in half of the specimens (n = 30), while the other half was left untreated (NB) (n = 30). Aging for all specimens was performed for 5 h at 134 °C. Color coordinates (L*, a*, and b*) before and after aging were measured to calculate the color change (ΔE00) and the translucency parameter (TP) within and between the B and NB groups. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the effect of boric acid on all color parameters (α = 0.05). Only L* increased in B after aging (p < 0.001). L* and b* significantly changed after aging in NB (p < 0.001). Boric acid application affected the color change within the ceramic after aging (p < 0.001). The mean color change (ΔE00) in B after aging was significantly smaller than the color change in NB after aging (p < 0.001). The color difference between B and NB increased after aging (p < 0.001). No significant effect of aging was found on TP of B (p = 0.143). The TP of NB significantly decreased after aging (p < 0.001). The use of boric acid provided color stability and translucency on aged tested material. Full article
12 pages, 2615 KiB  
Article
Laser Cleaning Improves Stem Cell Adhesion on the Dental Implant Surface during Peri-Implantitis Treatment
by Taras V. Furtsev, Anastasia A. Koshmanova, Galina M. Zeer, Elena D. Nikolaeva, Ivan N. Lapin, Tatiana N. Zamay and Anna S. Kichkailo
Dent. J. 2023, 11(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11020030 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2662
Abstract
Dental implant therapy is a well-accepted treatment modality. Despite good predictability and success in the early stages, the risk of postplacement inflammation in the long-term periods remains an urgent problem. Surgical access and decontamination with chemical and mechanical methods are more effective than [...] Read more.
Dental implant therapy is a well-accepted treatment modality. Despite good predictability and success in the early stages, the risk of postplacement inflammation in the long-term periods remains an urgent problem. Surgical access and decontamination with chemical and mechanical methods are more effective than antibiotic therapy. The search for the optimal and predictable way for peri-implantitis treatment remains relevant. Here, we evaluated four cleaning methods for their ability to preserve the implant’s surface for adequate mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Implants isolated after peri-implantitis were subjected to cleaning with diamond bur; Ti-Ni alloy brush, air-flow, or Er,Cr:YSGG laser and cocultured with mice MSC for five weeks. Dental bur and titanium brushes destroyed the implants’ surfaces and prevented MSC attachment. Air-flow and laser minimally affected the dental implant surface microroughness, which was initially designed for good cell adhesion and bone remodeling and to provide full microbial decontamination. Anodized with titanium dioxide and sandblasted with aluminum oxide, acid-etched implants appeared to be better for laser treatment. In implants sandblasted with aluminum oxide, an acid-etched surface better preserves its topology when treated with the air-flow. These cleaning methods minimally affect the implant’s surface, so it maintains the capability to absorb osteogenic cells for further division and differentiation. Full article
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11 pages, 1897 KiB  
Article
Can Abutment with Novel Superlattice CrN/NbN Coatings Influence Peri-Implant Tissue Health and Implant Survival Rate Compared to Machined Abutment? 6-Month Results from a Multi-Center Split-Mouth Randomized Control Trial
by Francesco Pera, Maria Menini, Mario Alovisi, Armando Crupi, Giulia Ambrogio, Sofia Asero, Carlotta Marchetti, Camilla Canepa, Laura Merlini, Paolo Pesce and Massimo Carossa
Materials 2023, 16(1), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16010246 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1491
Abstract
Background: The aim of the present multi-center split-mouth randomized control trial was to investigate the effect on peri-implant tissue of abutment with chromium nitride/ niobium nitride (CrN/NbN) coatings (superlattice) compared to traditional machined surface. Methods: Two adjacent posterior implants were inserted in 20 [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of the present multi-center split-mouth randomized control trial was to investigate the effect on peri-implant tissue of abutment with chromium nitride/ niobium nitride (CrN/NbN) coatings (superlattice) compared to traditional machined surface. Methods: Two adjacent posterior implants were inserted in 20 patients. A machined abutment was randomly screwed on either the mesial or distal implant, while a superlattice abutment was screwed on the other one. Implant survival rate, peri-implant probing depth (PPD), plaque index (PI), and bleeding index (BI) were collected 6 months after surgery, while marginal bone loss (MBL) was evaluated at T0 and T6.; Results: Implant survival rate was 97.7%. A total MBL of 0.77 ± 0.50 mm was recorded for superlattice abutments, while a mean MBL of 0.79 ± 0.40 mm was recorded for the abutment with machined surface. A mean PPD of 1.3 ± 0.23 mm was recorded for the superlattice Group, and a mean PPD of 1.31 ± 0.3 was recorded for the machined surface Group. PI was of 0.55 ± 0.51 for superlattice Group and 0.57 ± 0.50 for machined Group, while BI was of 0.47 ± 0.49 for superlattice Group and of 0.46 ± 0.40 for the machined one. No statistically significant difference was highlighted between the two Groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: After a 6-month observational period, no statistically significant differences were highlighted between superlattice abutment and traditional machined abutment. Further in vitro studies as well as clinical research with longer follow-ups are required to better investigate the surface properties of the novel abutments’ superlattice coating and its effect on the oral tissues. Full article
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10 pages, 1759 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Effect of Various Cementation Protocols Used for 10% Zirconia-Reinforced Lithium Glass Ceramic Veneer on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement (An In Vitro Study)
by Abdulsalam Rasheed Al-Zahawi
Coatings 2022, 12(12), 1931; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12121931 - 8 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1277
Abstract
Bonding failure between ceramic restoration and cement dramatically influences the success of resin-bonded ceramic restoration. This study evaluates the influence of various fitting surface treatments of 10% zirconia-reinforced lithium glass ceramic (ZLS) on its shear bonding strength to resin cement. Sixty blocks sized [...] Read more.
Bonding failure between ceramic restoration and cement dramatically influences the success of resin-bonded ceramic restoration. This study evaluates the influence of various fitting surface treatments of 10% zirconia-reinforced lithium glass ceramic (ZLS) on its shear bonding strength to resin cement. Sixty blocks sized 8 × 8 × 2 mm3 were cut from a ZLS. All specimens were fired for 10 min and separated into six groups according to surface treatment: GI (Without treatment), GII (10% HF acid, Ultra Sound water bath US, and silane coupling agent S), GIII (HF, US, S, and bonding without light cure B1), GIV (HF, US, 37% phosphoric acid PA, US, S, B1), GV (HF, US, S, and bonding with light curing B2), VI (HF, US, PA, US, S, and B2). The treated specimens were cemented to a resin cement cylinder of 3.5 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height (Variolink, Esthetic. Neutral). A universal test machine was used to test the shear bond strength (SBS) and SEM for failure mode. The result indicated that applying a bonding agent on the prepared surface of ZLS without curing before cementation significantly increases the shear bond strength and affects the failure mode. In contrast, the application of PA does not influence bond strength. Full article
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14 pages, 5007 KiB  
Article
Influence of the Peek Abutments on Mechanical Behavior of the Internal Connections Single Implant
by Jefferson David Melo de Matos, Guilherme da Rocha Scalzer Lopes, Daher Antonio Queiroz, André Luiz Jesus Pereira, Mário Alexandre Coelho Sinhoreti, Nathália de Carvalho Ramos, Vinicius Lino, Flavio Rosa de Oliveira, Alexandre Luiz Souto Borges and Marco Antonio Bottino
Materials 2022, 15(22), 8133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15228133 - 16 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
The present study aimed to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of PEEK abutments with different heights on single titanium implants. To investigate the implant surface, different tests (scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction) were adopted. Herein, 20 implants received the 4.5 × [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of PEEK abutments with different heights on single titanium implants. To investigate the implant surface, different tests (scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction) were adopted. Herein, 20 implants received the 4.5 × 4.0 mm PEEK short abutment (SA) and 20 received the 4.5 × 5.5 mm PEEK long abutment (LA). The abutments were installed using dual-cure resin cement. To determine the fatigue test, two specimens from each group were submitted to the single load fracture test. For this, the samples were submitted to a compressive load of (0.5 mm/min; 30°) in a universal testing machine. For the fatigue test, the samples received 2,000,000 cycles (2 Hz; 30°). The number of cycles and the load test was analyzed by the reliability software SPSS statistics using Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox tests (log-rank) (p < 0.05). The maximum load showed no statistically significant differences (p = 0.189) for the SA group (64.1 kgf) and the LA group (56.5 kgf). The study groups were statistically different regarding the number of cycles (p = 0.022) and fracture strength (p = 0.001). PEEK abutments can be indicated with caution for implant-supported rehabilitation and may be suitable as temporary rehabilitation. Full article
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9 pages, 678 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Load Distribution in a Mandibular Model with Four Implants Depending on the Number of Prosthetic Screws Used for OT-Bridge System: A Finite Element Analysis (FEA)
by Francesco Grande, Mario Cesare Pozzan, Raul Marconato, Francesco Mollica and Santo Catapano
Materials 2022, 15(22), 7963; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15227963 - 10 Nov 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1176
Abstract
In full-arch implant rehabilitations, when the anterior screw abutment channel compromises the aesthetic of the patient, the OT-Bridge system used with its Seeger rings may provide the necessary retention of the prosthesis. However, no studies have evaluated the forces generated at the Seeger [...] Read more.
In full-arch implant rehabilitations, when the anterior screw abutment channel compromises the aesthetic of the patient, the OT-Bridge system used with its Seeger rings may provide the necessary retention of the prosthesis. However, no studies have evaluated the forces generated at the Seeger level during loading. This Finite Element Analysis aims to investigate the mechanical behavior of Seeger rings in a mandibular model with four implants and an OT-Bridge system, used without one or two anterior prosthetic screws. A 400 N unilateral load was virtually applied on a 7 mm distal cantilever. Two different variables were considered: the constraint conditions using two or three screws instead of four and the three different framework materials (fiberglass reinforced resin, cobalt-chrome, TiAl6V4). The FEA analysis exhibited tensile and compressive forces on the Seeger closest to the loading point. With the resin framework, a tension force on abutment 3.3 generates a displacement from 5 to 10 times greater than that respectively expressed in metal framework materials. In a full-arch rehabilitation with four implants, the case with three prosthetic screws seems to be a safer and more predictable configuration instead of two. Considering the stress value exhibited and the mechanical properties of the Seeger, the presence of only two prosthetic screws could lead to permanent deformation of the Seeger in the screwless abutment closest to the loading point. Full article
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13 pages, 1743 KiB  
Article
Advancement of Marginal Bone and Soft Tissue Aesthetics for Slope-Configured Implants
by Małgorzata Pietruska and Jan Krzysztof Pietruski
Coatings 2022, 12(9), 1295; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12091295 - 2 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1436
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine changes within the marginal bone and soft tissue aesthetics following placement of implants with a sloped shoulder configuration. Thirty patients with a single missing tooth who showed a palatal/lingual–buccal bone height discrepancy of 2.0–3.0 mm [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to examine changes within the marginal bone and soft tissue aesthetics following placement of implants with a sloped shoulder configuration. Thirty patients with a single missing tooth who showed a palatal/lingual–buccal bone height discrepancy of 2.0–3.0 mm on CBCT were enrolled in the study. The thickness of buccal and palatal/lingual bone plates 1 and 3 mm apically from the platform; Pink Aesthetic Score and Papilla Index were evaluated. After the implant insertion the mean thickness of the buccal bone plate when measured 1 mm and 3 mm from the shoulder was 1.85 ± 0.68 mm and 1.99 ± 1.05 mm. Six months after the definitive crown delivery, the value of this parameter decreased by 0.32 ± 0.53 mm and 0.15 ± 1.05 mm, respectively. After the temporary crown delivery, the median Pink Aesthetic Score was 5, and it increased to 7.75 six months after the definitive crown delivery. Likewise, the Papilla Index median improved from 1 to 2. After the use of implants with a sloped shoulder configuration, a slight decrease in buccal bone plate thickness can be expected. However, the reduction in the thickness of this bone plate does not have a negative impact on soft tissues, as evidenced by the improvement in indices assessing aesthetics. Full article
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