Topic Editors

Department of Commerce, US Patent Trademark Office, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA
Dr. Rashi Ojha
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), Fresno, CA 93701, USA

Multifaceted Efforts from Basic Research to Clinical Practice in Controlling COVID-19 Disease

Abstract submission deadline
30 July 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
Viewed by
14770

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

COVID-19, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been around for over two years, representing the longest viral pandemic in history. Efforts to end or to reduce the short- or long-term adverse effects of the disease are multifaceted, including on-site quantitative viral assay, virus variant monitoring, multivalent vaccine development, drug discovery targeting viral replication and/or translation machinery, psychiatric treatment and counseling, antiviral and anti-inflammatory dual therapy, comorbidity control, and care for residual symptoms or syndrome. This Topic is intended to gather research articles, full reviews, and mini reviews touching upon the efforts listed above. We welcome any manuscript describing basic research and/or its translation to field or clinical practice in the multidisciplinary areas of SARS-CoV-2 assay and variant monitoring, multivalent vaccine development and drug targeting viral replication and/or translation machinery, psychiatric treatment and counseling, antiviral and anti-inflammatory dual therapy, comorbidity reduction, and care for residual diseases after viral eradication.

Dr. Yih-Horng Shiao
Dr. Rashi Ojha
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • translation machinery
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • variant
  • psychology
  • host susceptibility

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Brain Sciences
brainsci
3.3 3.9 2011 15.6 Days CHF 2200 Submit
Clinics and Practice
clinpract
2.3 2.0 2011 26.4 Days CHF 1600 Submit
COVID
covid
- - 2021 16.8 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Life
life
3.2 2.7 2011 17.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Vaccines
vaccines
7.8 7.0 2013 19.2 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Viruses
viruses
4.7 7.1 2009 13.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
18 pages, 1539 KiB  
Article
Blood Count and Renal Functionality Assessments in the Emergency Section Disclose Morbidity and Mortality in Omicron COVID-19 Patients: A Retrospective Study
by Eqrem Rusi, Fiorenza Pennacchia, Wael Abu Ruqa, Maria Antonella Zingaropoli, Patrizia Pasculli, Giuseppina Talarico, Giuseppe Bruno, Christian Barbato, Antonio Minni, Luigi Tarani, Gioacchino Galardo, Francesco Pugliese, Marco Lucarelli, Maria Rosa Ciardi, Luigi Meucci, Giampiero Ferraguti and Marco Fiore
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(3), 685-702; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14030055 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 208
Abstract
Background: SARS-CoV-2 is the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Even though we are no longer in a pandemic situation, people are still getting infected, some of them need hospitalization and a few of them die. Methods: We conducted a retrospective [...] Read more.
Background: SARS-CoV-2 is the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Even though we are no longer in a pandemic situation, people are still getting infected, some of them need hospitalization and a few of them die. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study including 445 patients who accessed the Emergency Section of Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy, where they had routine blood exams. In this study, we focused on the complete blood count, serum creatinine and azotemia. The data were analyzed using ANOVA, Spearman correlation and ROC analyses. They were divided into four groups based on their clinical outcomes: (1) the emergency group (patients who had mild forms and were quickly discharged); (2) the hospital ward group (patients who were admitted to the emergency section and were then hospitalized in a COVID-19 ward); (3) the intensive care unit (ICU) group (patients who required intensive assistance after the admission in the emergency section); (4) the deceased group (patients who had a fatal outcome after admission to the emergency section). Results: We found significant changes for creatinine, azotemia, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, basophils, monocytes, red blood cell distribution width, hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell numbers using ANOVA according to their clinical outcomes, particularly for the deceased group. Also, we found linear correlations of clinical outcomes with eosinophils, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, lymphocyte, neutrophil, platelet and red blood cell number and red blood cell distribution width. Conclusions: This study discloses an early association between “classical” routine blood biomarkers and the severity of clinical outcomes in Omicron patients. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 388 KiB  
Brief Report
Real-World Efficacy of COVID-19 Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis with Tixagevimab/Cilgavimab in People with Multiple Sclerosis
by Luke B. Elias, Aliya Jaber, Margarita Manzano, Mark Leekoff, Andrew Sylvester and Matthew A. Tremblay
Vaccines 2023, 11(12), 1855; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11121855 - 15 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1014
Abstract
Vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus were authorized for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States and have proven effective for the prevention of morbidity and death from COVID-19. Certain immunosuppressant medications prevent the development of protective immunity following [...] Read more.
Vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus were authorized for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States and have proven effective for the prevention of morbidity and death from COVID-19. Certain immunosuppressant medications prevent the development of protective immunity following COVID-19 vaccination. In December 2021, the FDA issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for a monoclonal-antibody combination of tixagevimab and cilgavimab, under the brand name Evusheld, for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against COVID-19 for individuals with moderate-to-severe immune compromise. While a 77% reduction in symptomatic COVID-19 was observed in the PROVENT study, the trial was conducted prior to emergence of the B.1.1.529 Omicron variant. We suspected reduced efficacy of PrEP against Omicron subvariants. We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing the prevalence of symptomatic COVID-19 infections between 1 January 2022 and 1 July 2022 in eligible patients treated with PrEP versus untreated using a questionnaire administered with the REDCap survey tool. Responses from 235 participants were included in the final analysis, with 176 untreated respondents and 59 in the PrEP cohort. Symptomatic COVID-19 infections were reported in 50 (28.4%) untreated participants and only 9 (15.3%) of those who received PrEP (p = 0.0557; OR 0.4536; 95% CI 0.2046 to 0.9599). Only two participants were hospitalized for COVID-19 infection, both in the untreated cohort. The reduction in COVID-19 infections did not achieve statistical significance, indicating diminished efficacy against Omicron variants. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 507 KiB  
Article
Post-COVID-19 Cognitive Decline and Apoe Polymorphism: Towards a Possible Link?
by José Wagner Leonel Tavares-Júnior, Danilo Nunes Oliveira, Jean Breno Silveira da Silva, Werbety Lucas Queiroz Feitosa, Artur Victor Menezes Sousa, Samuel Cavalcante Marinho, Letícia Chaves Vieira Cunha, Safira de Brito Gaspar, Carmem Meyve Pereira Gomes, Laís Lacerda Brasil de Oliveira, Caroline Aquino Moreira-Nunes, Emmanuelle Silva Tavares Sobreira, Maria Elisabete Amaral de Moraes, Manoel Alves Sobreira-Neto, Raquel Carvalho Montenegro and Pedro Braga-Neto
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1611; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13121611 - 21 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1216
Abstract
APOE ε4 polymorphism has been recently described as a possible association with cognitive deficits in COVID-19 patients. This research aimed to establish the correlation between COVID-19 and cognitive impairment, and the APOE gene polymorphism among outpatients. We performed a cross-sectional study with confirmed [...] Read more.
APOE ε4 polymorphism has been recently described as a possible association with cognitive deficits in COVID-19 patients. This research aimed to establish the correlation between COVID-19 and cognitive impairment, and the APOE gene polymorphism among outpatients. We performed a cross-sectional study with confirmed COVID-19 patients and neurological symptoms that persisted for more than three months from onset. APOE genotypes were determined. The final number of patients included in this study was 219, of which 186 blood samples were collected for APOE genotyping, evaluated 4.5 months after COVID-19. Among the participants, 143 patients (65.3%) reported memory impairment symptoms as their primary concern. However, this complaint was objectively verified through screening tests (Addenbrooke Cognitive Examination-Revised and Mini-Mental State Examination) in only 36 patients (16.4%). The group experiencing cognitive decline exhibited a higher prevalence of the APOE ε4 allele than the normal group (30.8% vs. 16.4%, respectively, p = 0.038). Furthermore, the APOE ε4 allele and anxiety symptoms remained significant after multivariate analysis. This study assessed an outpatient population where cognitive changes were the primary complaint, even in mild cases. Moreover, the ε4 allele, sleep disorders, and anxiety symptoms were more frequent in the cognitive decline group. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 631 KiB  
Brief Report
D-Dimer Assessment to Predict Pulmonary Embolism in ICU Patients with COVID-19 Pneumonia
by Jelger Louwsma, Bas Langeveld, Jacqueline M. Luyendijk and Huub L. A. van den Oever
COVID 2023, 3(9), 1380-1388; https://doi.org/10.3390/covid3090095 - 06 Sep 2023
Viewed by 930
Abstract
The value of D-dimer assessments in ICU patients with COVID-19 for the prediction of pulmonary embolism (PE) is unclear. The present study had two purposes: 1. To assess the specificity of elevated absolute D-dimer values for PE on admission to the ICU. 2. [...] Read more.
The value of D-dimer assessments in ICU patients with COVID-19 for the prediction of pulmonary embolism (PE) is unclear. The present study had two purposes: 1. To assess the specificity of elevated absolute D-dimer values for PE on admission to the ICU. 2. To assess the specificity of a D-dimer increment for the development of PE during an ICU stay. D-dimer values were paired with the results of a CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) and compared in patients with and without PE on admission. In patients without PE on initial imaging and available repeat CTPA during an ICU stay, D-dimer increments between initial and repeat imaging of patients developing PE during an ICU stay were compared with those with persistently no PE. On admission, D-dimers in patients with PE were higher than those in patients without PE (median 850 vs. 6060 μg/L; p < 0.0001). Using a cut-off of 9000 μg/L, the specificity for predicting PE was 100% (CI 95.3–100%). Delta D-dimer during an ICU stay was greater in patients with PE (median 7983 vs. 3815 μg/L; p < 0.005). Using a cut-off of 8000 μg/L, specificity was 100% (CI 79.4–100%). Strongly elevated D-dimer values on admission and marked increases in D-dimer during ICU stays have a high specificity for predicting pulmonary embolism in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 2037 KiB  
Article
Safety and Immunogenicity of Inactivated Whole Virion COVID-19 Vaccine CoviVac in Clinical Trials in 18–60 and 60+ Age Cohorts
by Ilya V. Gordeychuk, Liubov I. Kozlovskaya, Aleksandra A. Siniugina, Nadezhda V. Yagovkina, Vladimir I. Kuzubov, Konstantin A. Zakharov, Viktor P. Volok, Maria S. Dodina, Larissa V. Gmyl, Natalya A. Korotina, Rostislav D. Theodorovich, Yulia I. Ulitina, Dmitry I. Vovk, Marina V. Alikova, Anna A. Kataeva, Anna V. Kalenskaya, Irina V. Solovjeva, Elena V. Tivanova, Larissa Y. Kondrasheva, Antonina A. Ploskireva, Vasiliy G. Akimkin, Ksenia A. Subbotina, Georgy M. Ignatyev, Anastasia K. Korduban, Elena Y. Shustova, Ekaterina O. Bayurova, Alla S. Zhitkevich, Daria V. Avdoshina, Anastasia N. Piniaeva, Anastasia A. Kovpak, Liliya P. Antonova, Yulia V. Rogova, Anna A. Shishova, Yury Y. Ivin, Svetlana E. Sotskova, Konstantin A. Chernov, Elena G. Ipatova, Ekaterina A. Korduban and Aydar A. Ishmukhametovadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Viruses 2023, 15(9), 1828; https://doi.org/10.3390/v15091828 - 29 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1708
Abstract
We present the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center clinical trial phase I/II of the tolerability, safety, and immunogenicity of the inactivated whole virion concentrated purified coronavirus vaccine CoviVac in volunteers aged 18–60 and open multi-center comparative phase IIb clinical trial in [...] Read more.
We present the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center clinical trial phase I/II of the tolerability, safety, and immunogenicity of the inactivated whole virion concentrated purified coronavirus vaccine CoviVac in volunteers aged 18–60 and open multi-center comparative phase IIb clinical trial in volunteers aged 60 years and older. The safety of the vaccine was assessed in 400 volunteers in the 18–60 age cohort who received two doses of the vaccine (n = 300) or placebo (n = 100) and in 200 volunteers in 60+ age cohort all of whom received three doses of the vaccine. The studied vaccine has shown good tolerability and safety. No deaths, serious adverse events (AEs), or other significant AEs related to vaccination have been detected. The most common AE in vaccinated participants was pain at the injection site (p < 0.05). Immunogenicity assessment in stage 3 of Phase II was performed on 167 volunteers (122 vaccinated and 45 in Placebo Group) separately for the participants who were anti-SARS-CoV-2 nAB negative (69/122 in Vaccine Group and 28/45 in Placebo Group) or positive (53/122 in Vaccine Group and 17/45 in Placebo Group) at screening. On Day 42 after the 1st vaccination, the seroconversion rate in participants who were seronegative at screening was 86.9%, with the average geometric mean neutralizing antibody (nAB) titer of 1:20. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in IFN-γ production by peptide-stimulated T-cells was observed at Days 14 and 21 after the 1st vaccination. In participants who were seropositive at screening but had nAB titers below 1:256, the rate of fourfold increase in nAB levels was 85.2%, while in the participants with nAB titers > 1:256, the rate of fourfold increase in nAB levels was below 45%; the participants who were seropositive at screening of the 2nd vaccination did not lead to a significant increase in nAB titers. In conclusion, inactivated vaccine CoviVac has shown good tolerability and safety, with over 85% NT seroconversion rates after complete vaccination course in participants who were seronegative at screening in both age groups: 18–60 and 60+. In participants who were seropositive at screening and had nAB titers below 1:256, a single vaccination led to a fourfold increase in nAB levels in 85.2% of cases. These findings indicate that CoviVac can be successfully used both for primary vaccination in a two-dose regimen and for booster vaccination as a single dose in individuals with reduced neutralizing antibody levels. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 6773 KiB  
Brief Report
Extraction-Free RT-PCR Surveillance Testing and Reporting for SARS-CoV-2
by Patrick R. Carney, Tyler Duellman, Jia-Yi Chan, Lauren Wells, Michael Tessmer, Leah Frater-Rubsam, Molly Zeller, Mark Field, James Speers, Kelly Tyrrell, Luke Thompson, Michael Bondurant, Tami Morin, Tamra Dagnon, Brian Goff, Corissa Runde, Sandra Splinter-Bondurant, Charles Konsitzke, Patrick Kelly, Christopher A. Bradfield and Joshua Hymanadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
COVID 2023, 3(7), 1031-1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/covid3070075 - 21 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1338
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated sensitive, fast, and inexpensive testing for the virus in 2020 prior to the widespread availability of vaccines. Early testing efforts were limited by bottlenecks on reagents, low-throughput testing options, and the slow return of test results. In this paper, [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated sensitive, fast, and inexpensive testing for the virus in 2020 prior to the widespread availability of vaccines. Early testing efforts were limited by bottlenecks on reagents, low-throughput testing options, and the slow return of test results. In this paper, we detail the testing pipeline we established at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for rapid, inexpensive, and sensitive surveillance testing for SARS-CoV-2, and we highlight the strengths of the platform that would allow it to be applied to other disease surveillance projects, SARS-CoV-2 variant testing, or future pandemics. This pipeline can be quickly established for further accreditation and clinical application. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 2172 KiB  
Case Report
New Scenarios in Heart Transplantation and Persistency of SARS-CoV-2 (Case Report)
by Lubov Mitrofanova, Igor Makarov, Andrey Gorshkov, Olga Vorobeva, Maria Simonenko, Anna Starshinova, Dmitry Kudlay and Tatiana Karonova
Life 2023, 13(7), 1551; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13071551 - 13 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1396
Abstract
Heart transplantation is a treatment of choice for patients with severe heart failure. Infection transmission from a donor to a recipient remains a prominent problem in organ transplantation. However, the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in nonlung organ transplantation is still unclear. In this [...] Read more.
Heart transplantation is a treatment of choice for patients with severe heart failure. Infection transmission from a donor to a recipient remains a prominent problem in organ transplantation. However, the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in nonlung organ transplantation is still unclear. In this article we presented a case of a 28-year-old pregnant woman who developed heart failure soon after recovery from a SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester of gestation. In the postpartum period, the heart disease worsened and the patient required cardiac transplantation. We examined the recipient’s heart and made a diagnosis of left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Immunohistochemical analysis showed SARS-CoV-2 antigen expression in the donor’s heart before transplantation, and after the transplantation, an endomyocardial biopsy was taken. Moreover, an ultrastructural assessment of the endomyocardial specimen revealed endothelial and pericyte injury and a single particle on the surface of the endothelium consistent with SARS-CoV-2 viral particles. Recent findings in the literature associated these damages with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The present study describes the rare case of SARS-CoV-2 transmission from donor to postpartum recipient through a heart transplant and demonstrates the importance of endomyocardial biopsy before and after heart transplantation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 3787 KiB  
Article
A Pilot Study of Short-Course Oral Vitamin A and Aerosolised Diffuser Olfactory Training for the Treatment of Smell Loss in Long COVID
by Tom Wai-Hin Chung, Hui Zhang, Fergus Kai-Chuen Wong, Siddharth Sridhar, Tatia Mei-Chun Lee, Gilberto Ka-Kit Leung, Koon-Ho Chan, Kui-Kai Lau, Anthony Raymond Tam, Deborah Tip-Yin Ho, Vincent Chi-Chung Cheng, Kwok-Yung Yuen, Ivan Fan-Ngai Hung and Henry Ka-Fung Mak
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(7), 1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13071014 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1521
Abstract
Background: Olfactory dysfunction (OD) is a common neurosensory manifestation in long COVID. An effective and safe treatment against COVID-19-related OD is needed. Methods: This pilot trial recruited long COVID patients with persistent OD. Participants were randomly assigned to receive short-course (14 days) oral [...] Read more.
Background: Olfactory dysfunction (OD) is a common neurosensory manifestation in long COVID. An effective and safe treatment against COVID-19-related OD is needed. Methods: This pilot trial recruited long COVID patients with persistent OD. Participants were randomly assigned to receive short-course (14 days) oral vitamin A (VitA; 25,000 IU per day) and aerosolised diffuser olfactory training (OT) thrice daily (combination), OT alone (standard care), or observation (control) for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was differences in olfactory function by butanol threshold tests (BTT) between baseline and end-of-treatment. Secondary outcomes included smell identification tests (SIT), structural MRI brain, and serial seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analyses in the olfactory cortical network by resting-state functional MRI (rs–fMRI). Results: A total of 24 participants were randomly assigned to receive either combination treatment (n = 10), standard care (n = 9), or control (n = 5). Median OD duration was 157 days (IQR 127–175). Mean baseline BTT score was 2.3 (SD 1.1). At end-of-treatment, mean BTT scores were significantly higher for the combination group than control (p < 0.001, MD = 4.4, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.2) and standard care (p = 0.009) groups. Interval SIT scores increased significantly (p = 0.009) in the combination group. rs–fMRI showed significantly higher FC in the combination group when compared to other groups. At end-of-treatment, positive correlations were found in the increased FC at left inferior frontal gyrus and clinically significant improvements in measured BTT (r = 0.858, p < 0.001) and SIT (r = 0.548, p = 0.042) scores for the combination group. Conclusions: Short-course oral VitA and aerosolised diffuser OT was effective as a combination treatment for persistent OD in long COVID. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1878 KiB  
Article
Effects of Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Enhanced with Neuropsychological Treatment on Post-Acute SARS-CoV-2 Cognitive Impairment (Brain Fog): An Observational Study
by Paolo Rabaiotti, Chiara Ciracì, Davide Donelli, Carlotta Oggioni, Beatrice Rizzi, Federica Savi, Michele Antonelli, Matteo Rizzato, Luca Moderato, Valerio Brambilla, Valentina Ziveri, Lorenzo Brambilla, Matteo Bini, Antonio Nouvenne and Davide Lazzeroni
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(5), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13050791 - 12 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1760
Abstract
Concentration and memory impairment (named “brain fog”) represents a frequent and disabling neuropsychological sequela in post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS) patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether neurocognitive function could improve after a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program enhanced with individualized neuropsychological treatment. [...] Read more.
Concentration and memory impairment (named “brain fog”) represents a frequent and disabling neuropsychological sequela in post-acute COVID-19 syndrome (PACS) patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether neurocognitive function could improve after a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program enhanced with individualized neuropsychological treatment. A prospective monocentric registry of PACS patients consecutively admitted to our Rehabilitation Unit was created. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was used to assess cognitive impairment at admission and discharge. A total of sixty-four (64) PACS patients, fifty-six (56) of them with brain fog, were treated with a day-by-day individualized psychological intervention of cognitive stimulation (45 min) on top of a standard in-hospital rehabilitation program. The mean duration of the acute-phase hospitalization was 55.8 ± 25.8 days and the mean in-hospital rehabilitation duration was 30 ± 10 days. The mean age of the patients was 67.3 ± 10.4 years, 66% of them were male, none had a previous diagnosis of dementia, and 66% of the entire sample had experienced severe COVID-19. At admission, only 12% of the patients had normal cognitive function, while 57% showed mild, 28% moderate, and 3% severe cognitive impairment. After psychological treatment, a significant improvement in the MoCA score was found (20.4 ± 5 vs. 24.7 ± 3.7; p < 0.0001) as a result of significant amelioration in the following domains: attention task (p = 0.014), abstract reasoning (p = 0.003), language repetition (p = 0.002), memory recall (p < 0.0001), orientation (p < 0.0001), and visuospatial abilities (p < 0.0001). Moreover, the improvement remained significant after multivariate analysis adjusted for several confounding factors. Finally, at discharge, 43% of the patients with cognitive impairment normalized their cognitive function, while 4.7% were discharged with residual moderate cognitive impairment. In conclusion, our study provides evidence of the effects of multidisciplinary rehabilitation enhanced with neuropsychological treatment on improvement in the cognitive function of post-acute COVID-19 patients. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2422 KiB  
Case Report
Severe Course of COVID-19 and Long-COVID-19 in Children: Difficulties in Diagnosis
by Elena Vasichkina, Olga Kofeynikova, Svetlana Fetisova, Anastasia Y. Starshinova, Elizaveta Sheyanova, Tatiana Vershinina, Anton Ryzhkov, Aleksey Skripnik, Daria Alekseeva, Elizaveta Nechaeva, Anzhela Glushkova, Dmitry Kudlay, Tatiana Pervunina and Anna Starshinova
Life 2023, 13(3), 781; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13030781 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1676
Abstract
The question of COVID-19 and long-COVID-19 course in children remains unsolved. This infection in children, which is associated with COVID-19, can vary from asymptomatic to systemic damage of various systems. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, associated with SARS-CoV-2 (MIS-C), is a serious condition [...] Read more.
The question of COVID-19 and long-COVID-19 course in children remains unsolved. This infection in children, which is associated with COVID-19, can vary from asymptomatic to systemic damage of various systems. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, associated with SARS-CoV-2 (MIS-C), is a serious condition in children and adolescents after experiencing COVID-19. Published data on MIS-C have indicated that the inflammation can be registered in the gastrointestinal tract (60–100%), as well as in cardiovascular (80%), nervous (29–58%), and respiratory (21–65%) systems. However, with the changing characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, the manifestations of COVID-19 and long-COVID-19 in children have also been changing. Currently, there is no clear understanding of the development of severe COVID-19 and MIS-C in children, especially after being exposed to patients with COVID-19. We presented two new clinical courses of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children with severe multisystem damage after close contact to relatives with COVID-19 or long-COVID-19. Thus, high-risk children, who are positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection after contact with COVID-19 patients, should be clinically managed during the first few months. The identification of the disease complexity requires the involvement of neurologists, cardiologists, and other specialists. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop