Topic Editors

Dr. Shen Yang
Human-Oriented Built Environment Lab, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland
Institute of Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Dr. Delia D'Agostino
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, 21027 Ispra, Italy
School of Public Health (Shenzhen), Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen 518107, China

Indoor Air Quality and Built Environment

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
4535

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Indoor air quality (IAQ) is a critical factor in human well-being within the built environment, as exposure to indoor air pollutants has been strongly linked to health, comfort, and productivity. In the built environment, IAQ is influenced by several interacting factors, including air pollutant emissions, air purification, ventilation, and human behavior. Therefore, it is essential to understand these processes and the interconnectedness among IAQ, the built environment, and humans in order to promote public health and create comfortable and healthy indoor environments. The purpose of this topic is to gather the latest advancements in this field to broaden the interdisciplinary nature of IAQ research, deepen our understanding of the relationship between IAQ and humans, and improve IAQ control strategies in the built environment. We encourage submissions addressing, but not limited to, the following topics and issues:

• Indoor air pollutant sources:

o Identifying emerging indoor air pollutant sources

o Understanding the relationship between indoor and outdoor air pollution

o Characterizing and modeling air pollutant emissions

• Indoor air pollutant measurement:

o Detecting emerging indoor air pollutants

o Assessing novel IAQ measurement techniques

o Developing and evaluating low-cost IAQ sensors

• IAQ control:

o Exploring novel air purification technologies for indoor environments

o Developing integrative IAQ control strategies with building automation and IoT

o Performing cost–benefit analyses of IAQ control measures

• IAQ and humans:

o Understanding human emissions and digestion of air pollutants

o Assessing the impact of IAQ on human health, perception, satisfaction, and comfort

o Examining the relationship between IAQ and human behavior within indoor environments

Dr. Shen Yang
Prof. Dr. Grzegorz Majewski
Dr. Delia D'Agostino
Dr. Jianbang Xiang
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • built environment
  • air quality
  • indoor chemistry
  • measurement
  • subjective survey
  • emission
  • simulation
  • human health
  • human behavior
  • control technology and strategy

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Atmosphere
atmosphere
2.9 4.1 2010 17.7 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Toxics
toxics
4.6 3.4 2013 14.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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18 pages, 5647 KiB  
Article
Monitoring of Ventilation, Portable Air Cleaner Operation, and Particulate Matter in California Classrooms: A Pilot Study
by Wenhao Chen, Zhong-Min Wang, Kyle Peerless, Elon Ullman, Mark J. Mendell, David Putney, Jeff Wagner and Kazukiyo Kumagai
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 2052; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16052052 - 01 Mar 2024
Viewed by 711
Abstract
Interest in improving ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) in California schools has grown since the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper presents a field protocol for simultaneous monitoring of usage patterns of in-room portable air cleaners (PACs), indoor and outdoor concentrations and composition of [...] Read more.
Interest in improving ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) in California schools has grown since the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper presents a field protocol for simultaneous monitoring of usage patterns of in-room portable air cleaners (PACs), indoor and outdoor concentrations and composition of particulate matter (PM), and CO2 as an indicator of outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs). This protocol was implemented for a 7-week pilot study in four occupied California classrooms in 2022. Monitoring results showed that VRs and indoor PM were generally well maintained in the classrooms studied. One classroom had much higher overall VRs, as well as higher average indoor PM2.5 concentrations compared to similar classrooms, suggesting a possible strong impact of window/door opening behavior on both VRs and indoor PM. The actual use patterns of PACs in these classrooms varied significantly. No clear correlations were observed between PAC use patterns and indoor PM2.5 concentrations in this pilot study, possibly due to low outdoor PM2.5 concentrations and already efficient central filtration (i.e., MERV 13 filters in central ventilation systems). Information gathered through such field monitoring can help schools to understand the actual classroom ventilation and IAQ conditions and best allocate resources to classrooms that need further IAQ improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Indoor Air Quality and Built Environment)
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17 pages, 4369 KiB  
Article
Toward Sustainable Indoor Environments: Assessing the Impact of Thermal Insulation Measures on Air Quality in Buildings—A Case Study in Temuco, Chile
by Aner Martinez-Soto, Carlos Jimenez-Gallardo, Andrés Villarroel-Lopez, Alejandro Reyes-Riveros and Johanna Höhl
Sustainability 2024, 16(2), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16020547 - 09 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 723
Abstract
In Chile, an Atmospheric Decontamination Plan (PDA) has been developed to reduce concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) in cities deemed “saturated” with these particles. The plan includes various measures, such as the thermal insulation of homes and the replacement of heaters. [...] Read more.
In Chile, an Atmospheric Decontamination Plan (PDA) has been developed to reduce concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) in cities deemed “saturated” with these particles. The plan includes various measures, such as the thermal insulation of homes and the replacement of heaters. This study presents an analysis of the indices of four indoor air quality variables (temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and PM 2.5) in different types of homes with varying levels of PDA implementation in the city of Temuco, Chile. Regarding the temperature variable, only one type of home was found to be within comfort limits, with an average of 20.6 °C and a variation of ±3.52 °C (SD). Concerning humidity, independently owned homes with complete and moderate ADP implementation had average humidity levels between 64.82% ± 7.19% and 55.6% ± 6.11%, respectively. For CO2, only homes with moderate implementation showed averages slightly below (average 991 ppm) the maximum allowed (1000 ppm). As for PM 2.5, all homes exceeded the standard, ranging from 44.4 µg/m3 to 130 µg/m3, with very high variations. This demonstrates that PM 2.5 concentrations consistently exceeded the limits established by the World Health Organization (15 µg/m3). Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Indoor Air Quality and Built Environment)
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20 pages, 17796 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Local Mean Age of Air between Displacement Ventilation System and Mixing Ventilation System in Office Heating Conditions during Winter
by Ik-Hyun An, Su-Hoon Park, Yong-Ho Lee, Chang-Hoon Lee, Sang-Bum Seo, Sang-Hyun Cho, Hyun-Woo Lee and Se-Jin Yook
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010115 - 01 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1008
Abstract
A novel displacement ventilation system (DVS) was designed using a four-way cassette fan coil unit (FCU) and air purifiers (APs) for supplying clean air. The proposed DVS in this study involved drawing indoor air through the FCU and diffusers installed in the ceiling, [...] Read more.
A novel displacement ventilation system (DVS) was designed using a four-way cassette fan coil unit (FCU) and air purifiers (APs) for supplying clean air. The proposed DVS in this study involved drawing indoor air through the FCU and diffusers installed in the ceiling, controlling air temperature using the FCU, and then discharging it back into the office through the APs placed on the floor. The comparative ventilation system considered was the typical mixing ventilation system (MVS) that intakes and exhausts indoor air using diffusers installed on the ceiling. The local mean age of air was used as an index to compare indoor air quality between DVS and MVS under winter heating conditions. It was found that the DVS was more effective in improving indoor air quality in winter than the MVS. Moreover, compared to the MVS, utilizing the DVS designed in this study resulted in the advantage of a much more uniform air temperature variation in the office space. Therefore, it is anticipated that modifying the structure of an indoor space with an FCU installed in the ceiling and APs on the floor to use the DVS designed in this study would greatly assist in enhancing indoor air quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Indoor Air Quality and Built Environment)
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17 pages, 2461 KiB  
Article
Prediction of CO2 in Public Buildings
by Ekaterina Dudkina, Emanuele Crisostomi and Alessandro Franco
Energies 2023, 16(22), 7582; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16227582 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 761
Abstract
Heritage from the COVID-19 period (in terms of massive utilization of mechanical ventilation systems), global warming, and increasing electricity prices are new challenging factors in building energy management, and are hindering the desired path towards improved energy efficiency and reduced building consumption. The [...] Read more.
Heritage from the COVID-19 period (in terms of massive utilization of mechanical ventilation systems), global warming, and increasing electricity prices are new challenging factors in building energy management, and are hindering the desired path towards improved energy efficiency and reduced building consumption. The solution to improve the smartness of today’s building and automation control systems is to equip them with increased intelligence to take prompt and appropriate actions to avoid unnecessary energy consumption, while maintaining a desired level of air quality. In this manuscript, we evaluate the ability of machine-learning-based algorithms to predict CO2 levels, which are classic indicators used to evaluate air quality. We show that these algorithms provide accurate forecasts (more accurate in particular than those provided by physics-based models). These forecasts could be conveniently embedded in control systems. Our findings are validated using real data measured in university classrooms during teaching activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Indoor Air Quality and Built Environment)
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13 pages, 3976 KiB  
Article
The Development of a Low-Cost Particulate Matter 2.5 Sensor Calibration Model in Daycare Centers Using Long Short-Term Memory Algorithms
by Hyungjin Jeon, Jewan Ryu, Kyoung Min Kim and Junyeong An
Atmosphere 2023, 14(8), 1228; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14081228 - 30 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 870
Abstract
Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a crucial environmental issue. Considering its adverse health impacts, especially on children’s immune systems, Korean regulations require annual PM2.5 measurements in daycare centers. Therefore, we developed a low-cost PM2.5 sensor calibration model for measuring the indoor [...] Read more.
Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a crucial environmental issue. Considering its adverse health impacts, especially on children’s immune systems, Korean regulations require annual PM2.5 measurements in daycare centers. Therefore, we developed a low-cost PM2.5 sensor calibration model for measuring the indoor PM concentrations in daycare centers using long short-term memory (LSTM) algorithms. Moreover, we trained the model to predict the PM2.5 based on temperature and humidity, and optimized its hyperparameters. The model achieved a high accuracy and outperformed traditional calibration methods. The optimal lookback period was 76, which led to a high calibration performance with root mean and mean squared errors, a coefficient of determination, and mean absolute errors of 3.57 and 12.745, 0.962, and 2.7, respectively. The LSTM model demonstrated a better calibration performance than those of the linear (r2 = 0.57) and multiple (r2 = 0.75) linear regression models. The developed calibration model provided precise short-term measurement values for the optimal management of indoor PM concentrations. This methodology can be applied to similar environments to obtain new learning and hyper-parameters. Our results will aid in improving the accuracy of low-cost sensors for measuring indoor PM concentrations, thereby providing cost-effective solutions for enhancing children’s health and well-being in daycare centers and other multiuse facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Indoor Air Quality and Built Environment)
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