Topic Editors

Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Romanian Academy, 700487 Iasi, Romania
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Gipuzkoa, University of the Basque Country, Plaza Europa 1, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa, Spain
BioComposites Centre, Bangor University, Deiniol Road, Bangor LL57 2UW, UK

New Challenges in Wood and Wood-Based Materials

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 November 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (30 January 2024)
Viewed by
6220

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wood and wood-based products (plywood, glued laminated timber, fiberboards, particleboards, OSB, CLT, LVL, and wood–plastic composites, among others), are attracting increasing interest in the academic domain and industry to be used as building materials, in furniture and packaging. This is due to their properties, such as environmental friendliness, sustainability, carbon sequestration ability, low-cost production, low processing energy, high strength in relation to weight, and easy processing. Beside the many advantages, wood and wood-based products need to overcome some problems; therefore, the challenge is to ensure wood is more dimensionally stable, resistant to moisture and fire, and more durable against mold and weathering. Moreover, the traditional wood-based materials are usually produced with synthetic-based adhesives, characterized by emissions of hazardous volatile organic compounds, and related to health and environmental effects. Therefore, the transition to a circular, low-carbon bioeconomy and growing environmental concerns have increased the interest in development new, sustainable, eco-friendly wood-based products, the optimization of the available lignocellulosic resources, and the use of alternative raw materials. The aim of this Topic is to update the area of wood and wood-based materials with the latest developments and research activities, including modification techniques that address the gaps in the understanding of existing ones and novel treatments and coatings, new applications for wood by adding new functionalities, challenges in the development of new wood-based products, extend the current applications of wood and wood-based products by increasing their performance and durability, and wood‒water interaction, as well as weathering and mold resistance, in interior and exterior applications. We kindly invite contributions with the latest outcomes on this topic as review papers and research articles.

Kind regards,
Dr. Carmen-Mihaela Popescu
Dr. Jalel Labidi
Dr. Simon Curling
Topic Editors

 

Keywords

  • wood and wood-based products
  • novel treatments and coatings
  • new functionalities for wood
  • performance and durability
  • wood‒water interaction
  • weathering
  • mold resistance

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Coatings
coatings
3.4 4.7 2011 13.8 Days CHF 2600
Fibers
fibers
3.9 7.0 2013 24.1 Days CHF 2000
Forests
forests
2.9 4.5 2010 16.9 Days CHF 2600
Materials
materials
3.4 5.2 2008 13.9 Days CHF 2600
Polymers
polymers
5.0 6.6 2009 13.7 Days CHF 2700

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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19 pages, 1277 KiB  
Article
Economic Impacts of Projected White Oak (Quercus alba L.) Timber Supply in Kentucky: A CGE Model Analysis
by Gaurav Dhungel and Thomas O. Ochuodho
Forests 2024, 15(1), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15010093 - 3 Jan 2024
Viewed by 849
Abstract
Demand for high-quality white oak sawlogs in Kentucky has been increasing for decades. Concurrently, Kentucky is witnessing ecological shifts in the historically white oak-dominated forests, mirroring the structural changes in oak forests in the eastern US. This demand–supply dissonance presents a growing concern [...] Read more.
Demand for high-quality white oak sawlogs in Kentucky has been increasing for decades. Concurrently, Kentucky is witnessing ecological shifts in the historically white oak-dominated forests, mirroring the structural changes in oak forests in the eastern US. This demand–supply dissonance presents a growing concern among stakeholders on the sustainability of white oak and its associated economic implications. In this context, the objective of this study was to assess the potential economic impacts of the projected white oak timber supply following an overall increased supply of white oak sawlogs but reduced supply of high-quality white oak sawlogs in Kentucky. Results generated from a dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model indicate a cumulative present-value GDP reduction of USD 3.66 billion, a USD 0.71 billion decline in consumer welfare, and other sectoral contractions over 40 years (2018–2058). These results can be used to advocate for more proactive forest management practices to stabilize a sustained supply of high-quality white oak timber in Kentucky and beyond. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Challenges in Wood and Wood-Based Materials)
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11 pages, 1648 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Top-Layer Sliced Lamella Thickness and Core Type on Surface-Checking in Engineered Wood Flooring
by Victor Grubîi and Jimmy Johansson
Forests 2023, 14(11), 2250; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14112250 - 15 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 972
Abstract
Surface-checking is a significant quality issue of veneer and sliced lamellae-based wood products. This study explores how surface-checking in sliced lamellae-based engineered wood Flooring (EWF) is influenced by two key structure parameters: core type and top-layer thickness. The core types assessed were a [...] Read more.
Surface-checking is a significant quality issue of veneer and sliced lamellae-based wood products. This study explores how surface-checking in sliced lamellae-based engineered wood Flooring (EWF) is influenced by two key structure parameters: core type and top-layer thickness. The core types assessed were a standard solid wood lamellae with a veneer back-end layer (S), a standard solid wood lamellae core with veneer back-end layers on the two sides (DS), and a single-layer oriented strand board (OS) core. The EWF element’s top-layer lamellae were plain sliced at nominal dimensions of 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5 mm from freshly sawn slabs of European oak (Quercus spp.). The surface-checking of EWF specimens was quantified based on a digital image correlation (DIC) method, which outputs a surface-checking index. The surface-checking results were evaluated using a Tweedie compound Poisson data distribution to fit a general linear model. The model evaluated the impact of individual factors, sliced lamellae thickness and core type, and their interaction. The checking index confidence intervals were estimated using a bootstrapping technique. Findings reveal a significant interaction between studied factors and provide insight into optimizing top-layer thickness and core construction to diminish surface-checking. A low sliced lamella thickness on standard solid wood lamellae core resulted in low surface-checking, deemed relevant for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Challenges in Wood and Wood-Based Materials)
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17 pages, 8767 KiB  
Article
Possibilities for Efficient Furniture Construction Made of Thin and Ultra-Thin Materials by Using Mitre Joints
by Boryana Petrova, Vassil Jivkov and Nikolay Yavorov
Materials 2023, 16(21), 6855; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16216855 - 25 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1124
Abstract
One of the biggest challenges for designers and manufacturers of furniture is to reduce the thickness of conventional furniture materials such as particleboard (PB), medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and plywood. Designing furniture based on thin (less than 16 mm) and ultra-thin materials (less than [...] Read more.
One of the biggest challenges for designers and manufacturers of furniture is to reduce the thickness of conventional furniture materials such as particleboard (PB), medium-density fibreboard (MDF) and plywood. Designing furniture based on thin (less than 16 mm) and ultra-thin materials (less than 10 mm) is desirable for aesthetic reasons and because of the substantial material savings. However, the use of thin and ultra-thin materials reduces the strength of the furniture, especially the strength and deformation resistance of the joints. This study aimed to establish the possibilities for efficient furniture construction made of thin and ultra-thin materials using mitre joints. For this purpose, 14 types of L-type joints were tested: 12 glued and 2 detachable. The joints were made of eight wood-based panels and one non-wood panel. The bending moments and the stiffness coefficient under compression were determined. The obtained results show that the mitre joints made of laminated material with high-pressure laminate (HPL), 8 mm thick, MDF achieved the highest bending moment, and the highest stiffness coefficient was achieved by joints made of 10 mm thick compact HPL. Compact HPL joints were significantly affected by the type of adhesive used. Detachable joints had a relatively high bending strength but very low stiffness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Challenges in Wood and Wood-Based Materials)
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25 pages, 13777 KiB  
Article
Analyses of L-Type Corner Joints Connected with Auxetic Dowels for Case Furniture
by Ali Kasal, Jerzy Smardzewski, Tolga Kuşkun and Ersan Güray
Materials 2023, 16(13), 4547; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16134547 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1054
Abstract
Tests were carried out to develop and manufacture various types of auxetic dowels using 3D printing technology. These dowels were then used to connect L-type corner joint specimens for case furniture, and their strength and stiffness were analyzed through experimental, theoretical, and numerical [...] Read more.
Tests were carried out to develop and manufacture various types of auxetic dowels using 3D printing technology. These dowels were then used to connect L-type corner joint specimens for case furniture, and their strength and stiffness were analyzed through experimental, theoretical, and numerical means. In the scope of the study, eight different types of auxetic dowels including two inclusion types, two inclusion sizes, and two dowel hole diameters, as well as a reference non-auxetic dowel, were designed. Accordingly, a total of 180 specimens that included 10 replications for each group were tested; 90 were tested under tension and the remaining 90 were tested under compression. The results demonstrated that the assembly force required for the corner joints connected with auxetic dowels was significantly lower compared to non-auxetic dowels. Furthermore, the numerical and theoretical analyses yielded similar outcomes in this study. Both analyses revealed that the dowels used to connect the corner joints experienced substantial stresses during mounting and bending, ultimately leading to their failure. Upon concluding the test results, it was observed that the corner joints connected with dowels featuring rectangular inclusions exhibited superior performance when compared to those with triangular inclusions. In light of these findings, it can be concluded that further enhancements are necessary for auxetic dowels with rectangular inclusions before they can be utilized as alternative fasteners for traditional dowels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Challenges in Wood and Wood-Based Materials)
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13 pages, 3074 KiB  
Article
Effect of Freeze–Thaw Cycling on the Screw Direct Withdrawal Resistance of Beech, Ozigo, and Okoume Plywoods
by Emre Birinci and Alperen Kaymakci
Forests 2023, 14(6), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14061243 - 15 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 840
Abstract
Wood has been used in the construction, furniture, and automotive industries since ancient times. In areas where wood material is used, it is combined with various fasteners. The durability of the products produced using wooden materials depends on the performance of the fasteners. [...] Read more.
Wood has been used in the construction, furniture, and automotive industries since ancient times. In areas where wood material is used, it is combined with various fasteners. The durability of the products produced using wooden materials depends on the performance of the fasteners. Since wood is a hygroscopic and biodegradable material, various changes occur in its structure when exposed to external weather conditions. Wood materials used especially in the field of construction and urban furniture are exposed to effects such as extreme temperatures, freezing, moisture, or drying depending on the seasons. In this study, the effect of the freeze–thaw cycling (FTC) process on screw direct withdrawal resistance (SDWR) of plywood produced from beech, ozigo, and okoume species was investigated. In this context, the effects of screwing time (before or after), screw orientation (face or edge), the number of cycles (0 to 7) in the FTC process, and plywood type parameters on SDWR were investigated. As a result of the tests, when the mean SDWR values were examined according to the plywood type, the highest values were obtained in beech, ozigo, and okoume plywood, respectively. Considering the screwing time parameter, it was determined that there was no statistically significant difference between the mean SDWR values in other plywood types except beech plywood (p < 0.05). When the screw orientation parameter was examined, screwing in the face direction gave better results than screwing in the edge direction in all plywood types. There was a decrease in the mean SDWR values that was inversely proportional to the increase in the number of cycles in FTC-treated plywood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Challenges in Wood and Wood-Based Materials)
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