Topic Editors

Malik Feroz Khan Noon Business School, University of Sargodha, Punjab 40100, Pakistan
Dr. Shahid Kalim Khan
Department of Business Administration, Thal University Bhakkar, Bhakkar 30000, Pakistan
Malik Feroz Khan Noon Business School, University of Sargodha, Punjab 40100, Pakistan

Youth Engagement in Social Media in the Post COVID-19 Era

Abstract submission deadline
30 July 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 September 2024
Viewed by
38784

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Every industry and sector experienced significant damage as a result of the several COVID-19 pandemic waves on a global scale. People have been forced to work from home using social media and digital devices to meet their responsibilities and run their businesses as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Several educational and business organizations used social media platforms and other communication technologies to conduct their businesses in various ways. Although some COVID-19-related restrictions are still in effect, businesses and government organizations are struggling to return to normal operations. This Special Issue invites scholarly analyses and insights that examine how young people are using social media in the post-COVID-19 era. This Special Issue calls for research articles in a wide range of fields, such as education, law, services, marketing, tourism, ICT companies, business consultancies, non-profit organizations and other related fields. Proposals, research reports, and originals research manuscripts will be considered. Furthermore, we encourage academics from a variety of fields, including management, psychology, education, physical education, computer science, law, sociology, and other social science fields, to explore the pros and cons of using social media while keeping the COVID-19 context in mind. This scholarly work seeks to understand how young people are using social media in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic by researchers, practitioners, policymakers, governments, and organizational leaders. This Special Issue will also contribute to the literature for young people and social media use during and after COVID-19 to understand the use and appeal of social media in this comparison. Similarly, this call will help to understand how the forced use of social media during COVID-19 for shopping, education, and other purposes is adversely affecting the mental health and well-being of young people. In this specific call for research on “Youth Engagement in Social Media in the Post-COVID-19 Era”, we attempt to outline the following key objectives: 1. To comprehend the effectiveness of young people’s use of social media for educational and other objectives in the aftermath of the COVID1-19 crisis. 2. To investigate the negative effects of social media use on users' mental health and cognitive health in light of COVID-19. 3. To conduct a comparison of social media use in terms of youth productivity between the COVID-19 pandemic and the post-COVID 19 era.

Dr. Naseer Abbas Khan
Dr. Khan Shahid Kalim
Dr. Abdul Qayyum
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • social media use
  • post-COVID-19
  • mental health
  • youth wellbeing
  • social media addiction
  • youth engagement

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Information
information
3.1 5.8 2010 18 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Mathematics
mathematics
2.4 3.5 2013 16.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Multimodal Technologies and Interaction
mti
2.5 4.3 2017 14 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Symmetry
symmetry
2.7 4.9 2009 16.2 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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30 pages, 5250 KiB  
Review
Impact of Screen Time on Children’s Development: Cognitive, Language, Physical, and Social and Emotional Domains
by Vaishnavi N. Panjeti-Madan and Prakash Ranganathan
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2023, 7(5), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti7050052 - 16 May 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 37059
Abstract
Technology has become integral to children’s lives, impacting many aspects, from academic to socialization. Children of today’s generation are growing up with digital devices, such as mobile phones, iPads, computers, video games, and smart gadgets; therefore, screen time has become ubiquitous in children’s [...] Read more.
Technology has become integral to children’s lives, impacting many aspects, from academic to socialization. Children of today’s generation are growing up with digital devices, such as mobile phones, iPads, computers, video games, and smart gadgets; therefore, screen time has become ubiquitous in children’s daily routines. This paper provides a review of screen time usage and its impact in children across multiple developmental domains: cognitive, language, physical, and socio-emotional domain of children under eight years of age. The cognitive domain considers factors such as attention span and memory; language domain examines vocabulary, speech, and language development; physical domain focuses on motor development, exercise, sleep, and diet; and social-emotional domain considers relationships, self-identity, and emotional behaviors/regulation. Our findings are mixed, as there are both benefits and drawbacks in technology use, but screen time in children requires controlled observation and monitoring for sustainable improved progress across developmental domains. Specific recommendations advise that children’s screen time per day should be limited to zero minutes (min) (0–2 years), <60 min (3–5-years), and 60 min (6–8 years). Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Youth Engagement in Social Media in the Post COVID-19 Era)
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