Topic Editors

Department of Forest and Environmental Engineering and Management, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, Sustainable Forest Management Unit, Department of Agroforestry Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, E27002 Lugo, Spain
Research Group—PROePLA, Department of Crop Production and Project Management of Campus Terra in Lugo, University Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain

Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets

Abstract submission deadline
1 May 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
1 July 2024
Viewed by
5869

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the birth of the Kyoto Protocol, various forms of incentives and mechanisms have been proposed that promote a greater capture of atmospheric carbon by forest systems through changes in land use, avoiding deforestation, or modifications in their current management (e.g., improved forest management). The idea that man can modify land use, or the management carried out in forest areas, to favour a net carbon capture is energetically topical, based on the objectives regarding emission reductions that countries must be met in the coming years. For this reason, the central theme of this Topic is to compile papers that focus on land use change processes and their management, which lead to an increase in carbon sequestration and whose consequences can be integrated into established markets (carbon markets voluntary or regulated), or in other systems such as money transfers from one country to another (e.g., REDD+ programs). It is intended to address this challenge through a transversal and multidisciplinary perspective and to collect case studies from different areas of the world. This perspective aims to stimulate the reception of manuscripts that do not focus only on aspects of carbon measurement but on the consequences derived from these policies in different prisms: the effect on other ecosystem services, changes in the behaviour of the owners of these lands, macroeconomic implications, etc.

Prof. Dr. Luis Diaz-Balteiro
Dr. César Pérez-Cruzado
Prof. Dr. Manuel Marey-Pérez
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • land use and land use change
  • carbon farming
  • afforestation/reforestation
  • improved forest management
  • carbon markets
  • REDD+
  • ecosystem services and sustainability
  • climate change mitigation
  • territorial spatial planning
  • sustainable land use and planning
  • economic incentives
  • forest carbon stocks
  • land carbon projects
  • carbon storage in wood products
  • certification of carbon removals

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Economies
economies
2.6 3.2 2013 21.4 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Forests
forests
2.9 4.5 2010 16.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Land
land
3.9 3.7 2012 14.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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21 pages, 3542 KiB  
Article
Development of Activity Data for Greenhouse Gas Inventory in Settlements in South Korea
by Sol-E Choi, Moonil Kim, Yowhan Son, Seong-Woo Jeon, Kyeong-Hak Lee, Whijin Kim, Sun-Jeoung Lee and Woo-Kyun Lee
Land 2024, 13(4), 497; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13040497 - 11 Apr 2024
Viewed by 313
Abstract
In South Korea, Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) collates greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. However, the settlement category lacks a clear definition of land use and activity data. This study proposed a method for examining the settlement spatial extent and constructing activity [...] Read more.
In South Korea, Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) collates greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. However, the settlement category lacks a clear definition of land use and activity data. This study proposed a method for examining the settlement spatial extent and constructing activity data to estimate GHG emissions and absorption as a pilot calculation, as well as to provide data for land use classification. Utilizing cadastral maps (CDMs), settlement spatial extents were determined, with settlements occupying approximately 11% of the total land area in 2019, or 9% excluding overlaps. Activity data for settlements were established through a sampling method and analysis of aerial orthoimages from 2000 and 2019. After removing overlaps with digital forest type maps and smart farm maps, settlement activity data covered approximately 18.47% based on CDMs, or 12.66% excluding overlaps. In 2019, CO2 emissions and absorptions were estimated at 622.16 ktCO2yr−1 based on CDMs and 242.16 ktCO2yr−1, excluding overlaps. To enhance GHG inventory calculation consistency and compliance with TACCC principles, clear spatial extents for settlements must be established. This entails constructing activity data and assessing GHG inventories accordingly. GHG inventory statistics should also inform future nationally determined contributions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets)
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22 pages, 13586 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Territorial Spatial Transformation on Carbon Storage: A Case Study of Suqian, East China
by Wenting Huang, Long Guo, Ting Zhang, Ting Chen, Longqian Chen, Long Li and Xundi Zhang
Land 2024, 13(3), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030348 - 08 Mar 2024
Viewed by 607
Abstract
The carbon storage of terrestrial ecosystems plays a crucial role in mitigating climate change, and the transformation of territorial space has a significant impact on the carbon cycle of a country’s terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, evaluating the impact of space transformation on carbon storage [...] Read more.
The carbon storage of terrestrial ecosystems plays a crucial role in mitigating climate change, and the transformation of territorial space has a significant impact on the carbon cycle of a country’s terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, evaluating the impact of space transformation on carbon storage is essential for enhancing regional carbon storage potential and reducing carbon emissions. We use the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) model to analyze the dynamic changes in territorial spatial transformation and carbon storage from 2000 to 2020 in Suqian, as well as their relationship. On this basis, the optimization strategy and specific path for improving territorial space carbon storage capacity were determined. The results show the following: that (1) from 2000 to 2020, territorial spatial transformation in Suqian was dramatic, with the most significant changes occurring between 2005 and 2010. The scale of mutual transformation between agricultural production space and urban–rural construction space was the largest. (2) Carbon storage gradually decreased in Suqian City, with a total reduction of 1.23 × 106 tons over 20 years and an annual decrease of 1.46%. The carbon density of forested space was significantly higher than that of other spaces. The conversion of agricultural production space and forestland space to urban–rural construction space was the main factor driving a decrease in carbon storage. (3) Territorial spatial transformation is a spatial manifestation of the evolution of human–land relationships. Regulating the function, scale, structure and layout of territorial space as a whole and implementing differentiated management of specific space will be beneficial to optimize carbon storage in Suqian. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets)
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21 pages, 29678 KiB  
Article
Patterns and Dominant Driving Factors of Carbon Storage Changes in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau under Multiple Land Use Change Scenarios
by Huihui Zhao, Caifeng Yang, Miao Lu, Longhao Wang and Bing Guo
Forests 2024, 15(3), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15030418 - 22 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 612
Abstract
Revealing the spatial–temporal evolution of carbon storage and its driving mechanisms in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau could provide support for decision making in the protection of regional ecosystems and the achievement of regional dual-carbon goals. In this study, the spatial–temporal evolution of carbon storage [...] Read more.
Revealing the spatial–temporal evolution of carbon storage and its driving mechanisms in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau could provide support for decision making in the protection of regional ecosystems and the achievement of regional dual-carbon goals. In this study, the spatial–temporal evolution of carbon storage in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau was analyzed under various scenarios using PLUS-InVEST and a gravity center model, and the driving mechanisms of carbon storage were clarified with Geodetector. The results are as follows: (1) During 2000–2020, the areas of coniferous forest, evergreen broad-leaved forest, closed shrub, temperate shrub desert, multi-tree grassland, and grassland showed an increasing trend, while the areas of deciduous broad-leaved forest and mixed forest showed a decreasing trend. (2) During 2030–2060, there was a decreasing trend in the total carbon storage of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau under three different scenarios. (3) During 2030–2060, the area of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau was mostly represented by carbon balance (56%), while the areas of carbon sources and carbon sinks showed a scattered distribution. (4) The precipitation and topographic factors with a q value of 0.888 played a dominant role in affecting the spatio-temporal variations in carbon storage in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. (5) In future ecological protection and restoration efforts, more high-quality farmlands should be protected and constructed, which could contribute to the achievement of dual-carbon goals. In addition, the hydrothermal conditions should be improved to aid the carbon cycle process in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets)
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34 pages, 4152 KiB  
Article
Integration of Land Use Potential in Energy System Optimization Models at Regional Scale: The Pantelleria Island Case Study
by Daniele Mosso, Luca Rajteri and Laura Savoldi
Sustainability 2024, 16(4), 1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16041644 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 664
Abstract
In the context of the energy transition, the integration of land use considerations into energy planning can provide significant improvements. In energy system optimization models (ESOMs), land use aspects can be integrated at the cost of a finer spatial resolution and a more [...] Read more.
In the context of the energy transition, the integration of land use considerations into energy planning can provide significant improvements. In energy system optimization models (ESOMs), land use aspects can be integrated at the cost of a finer spatial resolution and a more detailed characterization of land, tailored to regional constraints and specificities. Additionally, an assessment of trade-offs with alternative land uses is necessary. Nevertheless, they are commonly neglected. This study addresses the challenge of incorporating land use aspects into ESOMs, with a focus on the unique context of Pantelleria Island. It aims to bridge the gap in methodologies for renewable energy potential assessment and model integration, considering the critical role of land pricing and availability. It combines geospatial data aggregation with model adaptation to include detailed land use aspects. The findings highlight the substantial impact of land costs on renewable energy planning, with land pricing significantly altering model outcomes. This research offers key insights for sustainable energy planning and underscores the importance of considering land use in energy transition strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets)
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17 pages, 13401 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Impacts of Change in Land Use/Cover on Carbon Storage in Multiple Scenarios in the Taihang Mountains, China
by Huanchao Guo, Shi He, Haitao Jing, Geding Yan and Hui Li
Sustainability 2023, 15(19), 14244; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151914244 - 26 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
Research on the spatiotemporal changes in land use/cover (LUC) and carbon storage (CS) in the region of the Taihang Mountains in various developmental scenarios can provide significant guidance for optimizing the structure of LUC and formulating ecologically friendly economic development policies. We employed [...] Read more.
Research on the spatiotemporal changes in land use/cover (LUC) and carbon storage (CS) in the region of the Taihang Mountains in various developmental scenarios can provide significant guidance for optimizing the structure of LUC and formulating ecologically friendly economic development policies. We employed the PLUS and InVEST models to study change in LUC and CS in the Taihang Mountains from 1990 to 2020. Based on these results, we established three distinct development scenarios: a business-as-usual development scenario, a cropland protection scenario, and an ecological conservation scenario. Based on these three developmental scenarios, we simulated the spatiotemporal changes in LUC and CS in the Taihang Mountains in 2035. The results indicate that: (1) from 1990 to 2020, the CS in the Taihang Mountains increased from 1575.91 Tg to 1598.57 Tg, with a growth rate of approximately 1.44%. The primary source of this growth is attributed to the expansion of forests. (2) In the business-as-usual development scenario, the growth rate of CS in the Taihang Mountains was approximately 0.45%, indicating a slowdown in the trend. This suggests that economic development has the consequences of aggravating human–land conflicts, leading to a deceleration in the growth of CS. (3) In the cropland protection scenario, the increase in the CS in the Taihang Mountains was similar to the CS increase in the business-as-usual development scenario. However, the expansion of cropland dominated by impermeable surfaces, which indicates economic development, was considerably constrained in this scenario. (4) In the ecological conservation scenario, the increase in carbon storage in the Taihang Mountains was 1.16%, which is the fastest among all three scenarios. At the same time, there was a certain degree of development of impermeable surfaces, achieving a balance between economic development and ecological conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets)
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17 pages, 11308 KiB  
Article
Impact of Land Use Change on Carbon Storage Based on FLUS-InVEST Model: A Case Study of Chengdu–Chongqing Urban Agglomeration, China
by Zhouling Shao, Chunyan Chen, Yuanli Liu, Jie Cao, Guitang Liao and Zhengyu Lin
Land 2023, 12(8), 1531; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12081531 - 02 Aug 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1343
Abstract
Land use change is one of the main factors driving changes in terrestrial carbon storage, which comprises the storage of vegetation carbon and soil carbon. Selecting the Chengdu–Chongqing urban agglomeration (CCUA) as the study area, land use and carbon storage from 2010 to [...] Read more.
Land use change is one of the main factors driving changes in terrestrial carbon storage, which comprises the storage of vegetation carbon and soil carbon. Selecting the Chengdu–Chongqing urban agglomeration (CCUA) as the study area, land use and carbon storage from 2010 to 2030 were analyzed by combining the Future Land Use Simulation (FLUS) model and the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) model. The main types of land use in CCUA are farmland and forest. The conversion of farmland to built-up land was the most important form of land use transfer between 2010 and 2020. Each type of land use shows the smallest change under the ecological protection scenario, and the degree of the comprehensive land use dynamic is only 0.19%. Under the natural development scenario, the areas of built-up land, wetland, and forest land will increase in 2030. Under the urban development scenario, the built-up land area will increase by 751.24 km2, an increase in more than 10.08%, but farmland, forest, and grassland will decrease. The spatial pattern of carbon storage is “high in the east and west, low in the middle”; farmland accounts for the largest proportion of carbon storage at over 60% of the total. Carbon storage decreased by 29.45 × 106 Mg from 2010 to 2020. Grassland showed the most significant decrease in carbon storage, with the proportion decreasing from 7.49% in 2010 to 6.09% in 2020. In 2030, the total carbon storage will reach 1844.68 × 106 Mg under the ecological protection scenario, slightly higher than that in 2020, while it will show a downward trend under the natural development and urban development scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Land Use Change, Carbon, and Markets)
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