Topic Editors

Department of Preventive Dentistry, Okayama University Medical School, Okayama, Japan
Dr. Hiroaki Inaba
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan

Oral Health Management for Children, Adolescents, and Adults, 2nd Volume

Abstract submission deadline
closed (1 December 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (1 February 2024)
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7752

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is the expanded second edition of the Topic: Oral Health Management for Children, Adolescents, and Adults that 1st edition was resulted in publishing of 35 papers.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are focused on preserving the global environment and creating an equitable human society. All countries and stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, will work toward the SDGs. Dentistry will unexceptionally contribute to one of the SDGs, “Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”.

As is well known, oral health can contribute to wellbeing and quality of life. Oral health and oral diseases are closely associated with systemic conditions and diseases. Thus, it is very important for all people to manage oral health and prevent oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral cancer, eating disorders, oral malodor, malocclusion, oral dysfunction, temporomandibular disorders, bruxism, etc. In particular, the prevention of oral diseases at an earlier age is quite challenging but is essential for future life.

Hence, this Special Issue will focus on oral health management for children, adolescents, and adults. New research articles, reviews, and case reports are welcome. Articles dealing with new approaches to prevent oral diseases and with risk assessment and education are also welcome. Other accepted manuscript types include methodological papers, position papers, and brief reports.

Dr. Daisuke Ekuni
Dr. Hiroaki Inaba
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • oral health
  • oral diseases
  • management
  • prevention
  • children
  • adolescents
  • adults
  • epidemiology
  • clinical study
  • in vitro study
  • in vivo study
  • public health
  • quality of life
  • education
  • wellbeing

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Children
children
2.4 2.0 2014 13.8 Days CHF 2400
Dentistry Journal
dentistry
2.6 4.0 2013 27.8 Days CHF 2000
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500
Nutrients
nutrients
5.9 9.0 2009 14.5 Days CHF 2900
Oral
oral
- - 2021 27.7 Days CHF 1000

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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15 pages, 1607 KiB  
Article
Probiotics Partly Suppress the Impact of Sugar Stress on the Oral Microbiota—A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial
by Christine Lundtorp Olsen, Laura Massarenti, Vincent Frederik Dahl Vendius, Ulvi Kahraman Gürsoy, Annina Van Splunter, Floris J. Bikker, Mervi Gürsoy, Christian Damgaard, Merete Markvart and Daniel Belstrøm
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4810; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224810 - 17 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
The aim was to test if probiotics counteract oral dysbiosis during 14 days of sugar stress and subsequently help restore oral homeostasis. Eighty healthy individuals received either probiotics (n = 40) or placebo lozenges (n = 40) for 28 days and [...] Read more.
The aim was to test if probiotics counteract oral dysbiosis during 14 days of sugar stress and subsequently help restore oral homeostasis. Eighty healthy individuals received either probiotics (n = 40) or placebo lozenges (n = 40) for 28 days and rinsed with a 10% sucrose solution 6–8 times during the initial 14 days of the trial. Saliva and supragingival samples were collected at baseline, day 14, and day 28. Saliva samples were analyzed for levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, albumin, and salivary enzyme activity. The supragingival microbiota was characterized according to the Human Oral Microbiome Database. After 14 days of sugar stress, the relative abundance of Porphyromonas species was significantly higher (p = 0.03) and remained significantly elevated at day 28 in the probiotic group compared to the placebo group (p = 0.004). At day 28, the relative abundance of Kingella species was significantly higher in the probiotic group (p = 0.03). Streptococcus gordinii and Neisseria elongata were associated with the probiotic group on day 28, while Streptococcus sobrinus was associated with the placebo group on day 14 and day 28. On day 28, the salivary albumin level was significantly lower in the probiotic group. The present study demonstrates a potential stabilizing effect on the supragingival microbiota mediated by consumption of probiotics during short-term sugar stress. Full article
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15 pages, 2683 KiB  
Article
Probiotics Support Resilience of the Oral Microbiota during Resolution after Experimental Gingivitis—A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial
by Christine Lundtorp Olsen, Laura Massarenti, Vincent Frederik Dahl Vendius, Ulvi Kahraman Gürsoy, Annina Van Splunter, Floris J. Bikker, Mervi Gürsoy, Christian Damgaard, Merete Markvart and Daniel Belstrøm
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4805; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224805 - 16 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1506
Abstract
The present study aims to test whether probiotics protect against experimental gingivitis incited by 14 days of oral hygiene neglect and/or subsequently support the restoration of oral homeostasis. Eighty systemically and orally healthy participants refrained from oral hygiene procedures for 14 days, followed [...] Read more.
The present study aims to test whether probiotics protect against experimental gingivitis incited by 14 days of oral hygiene neglect and/or subsequently support the restoration of oral homeostasis. Eighty systemically and orally healthy participants refrained from oral hygiene procedures for 14 days, followed by 14 days with regular oral hygiene procedures. Additionally, participants consumed either probiotics (n = 40) or placebo (n = 40) throughout the trial. At baseline, day 14, and day 28, supragingival plaque score and bleeding-on-probing percentage (BOP %) were registered, and supragingival plaque and saliva samples were collected. The supragingival microbiota was characterized using 16S sequencing, and saliva samples were analyzed for levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteases. At day 28, the relative abundance of Lautropia (p = 0.014), Prevotella (p = 0.046), Fusobacterium (p = 0.033), and Selenomonas (p = 0.0078) genera were significantly higher in the placebo group compared to the probiotics group, while the relative abundance of Rothia (p = 0.047) species was associated with the probiotics group. Streptococcus sanguinis was associated with the probiotics group, while Campylobacter gracilis was associated with the placebo group. No difference was observed in salivary cytokines, albumin, or any enzyme activity. The present study suggests that probiotics support the resilience of the oral microbiota in the resolution period after gingivitis. Full article
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12 pages, 611 KiB  
Article
Descriptive Study of Oral Health in an Indigenous Child Population of Baka Pygmies in Cameroon
by Nicias Afoumpam Poni, David Ribas-Pérez, Javier Flores-Fraile, Paloma Villalva Hernández-Franch, Diego Rodríguez-Menacho and Antonio Castaño-Séiquer
Dent. J. 2023, 11(10), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11100237 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1350
Abstract
Indigenous populations around the world experience a disproportionate burden of oral diseases and health conditions. These inequalities are likely due to a complex web of socioeconomic, cultural, and health determinants. The Baka pygmies of southern Cameroon find themselves in this context of an [...] Read more.
Indigenous populations around the world experience a disproportionate burden of oral diseases and health conditions. These inequalities are likely due to a complex web of socioeconomic, cultural, and health determinants. The Baka pygmies of southern Cameroon find themselves in this context of an indigenous population with health inequities. The purpose of this study was to describe the oral health status, diet, hygiene habits, and access to health services of the Baka pygmy children, from which different care needs will emerge in order to develop health strategies. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 22 Baka pygmy camps randomly selected. The study population consisted of children aged 5–6 years and 11–12 years chosen by a consecutive sampling technique. The examination was performed using a data sheet based on World Health Organization (WHO) criteria and recommendations which consisted of an oral health questionnaire for children and an oral health assessment form for children. A total of 120 children participated in the study. Extraoral examination of the study population revealed the presence of noma (1%) in the age range of 5–6 years. A total of 2713 teeth were examined, and the DMFT/dft index of the sample was 0.71 with a predominant caries component. The periodontal status showed 87% bleeding on probing. Seven percent of the sample presented a need for immediate urgent treatment due to pain and/or infection. Eighty-seven percent of the sample reported never having been examined by a dentist. The examination and oral care they received was only from nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The conclusion of this descriptive study is that the precarious oral health situation of pygmy children combined with the absence of care services in general for the Baka pygmies generate a situation of great vulnerability. Full article
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15 pages, 795 KiB  
Review
Exploring the Role of IL-17A in Oral Dysbiosis-Associated Periodontitis and Its Correlation with Systemic Inflammatory Disease
by Koichiro Irie, Tetsuji Azuma, Takaaki Tomofuji and Tatsuo Yamamoto
Dent. J. 2023, 11(8), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj11080194 - 12 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1111
Abstract
Oral microbiota play a pivotal role in maintaining homeostasis, safeguarding the oral cavity, and preventing the onset of disease. Oral dysbiosis has the potential to trigger pro-inflammatory effects and immune dysregulation, which can have a negative impact on systemic health. It is regarded [...] Read more.
Oral microbiota play a pivotal role in maintaining homeostasis, safeguarding the oral cavity, and preventing the onset of disease. Oral dysbiosis has the potential to trigger pro-inflammatory effects and immune dysregulation, which can have a negative impact on systemic health. It is regarded as a key etiological factor for periodontitis. The emergence and persistence of oral dysbiosis have been demonstrated to mediate inflammatory pathology locally and at distant sites. The heightened inflammation observed in oral dysbiosis is dependent upon the secretion of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) by various innate and adaptive immune cells. IL-17A has been found to play a significant role in host defense mechanisms by inducing antibacterial peptides, recruiting neutrophils, and promoting local inflammation via cytokines and chemokines. This review seeks to present the current knowledge on oral dysbiosis and its prevention, as well as the underlying role of IL-17A in periodontitis induced by oral dysbiosis and its impact on systemic inflammatory disease. Full article
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12 pages, 527 KiB  
Article
Pediatric Dental Emergencies during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Romania: A Retrospective Study
by Abel Emanuel Moca, Raluca Iurcov, Gabriela Ciavoi, Rahela Tabita Moca and Lucian Roman Șipoș
Children 2023, 10(5), 807; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10050807 - 29 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1202
Abstract
Pediatric dental emergencies can occur as a result of untreated dental caries, or can be caused by trauma or periodontal issues. The lockdown imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the number of centers authorized to deliver dental services in Romania, with only a [...] Read more.
Pediatric dental emergencies can occur as a result of untreated dental caries, or can be caused by trauma or periodontal issues. The lockdown imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the number of centers authorized to deliver dental services in Romania, with only a small number of dentists delivering dental emergency treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the demographic characteristics of children and adolescent patients who were treated in the dental emergency department of Oradea, Romania and to compare the patients who were treated in the dental emergency department in the pre-lockdown (2019), lockdown (2020) and post-lockdown year (2021). All patients who were treated in the dental emergency department were included in the study except for adults and medical files that did not contain all relevant information. Several variables were investigated (age, gender, living environment, location of affected teeth, type of emergency). In 2019, 257 children and adolescents were treated, in 2020, 198, and in 2021, 136. Most patients were aged 7–12 years in all investigated years (2019—47.9%; 2020—50.5%; 2021—43.4%), and the most affected teeth were located in the lower posterior arch (2019—53.3%; 2020—53%; 2021—48.5%). The most frequent emergencies were pulpitis (2019—40.5%; 2020—43.9%) and acute apical periodontitis (2021—42.6%). It was observed that in 2019, patients aged between 0 and 6 years were more frequently associated with trauma (p < 0.001), and in 2019 and 2020, patients aged between 7 and 12 years were more frequently associated with periodontal emergencies (p < 0.001). In 2020, patients from rural areas were more frequently associated with pulpitis (p = 0.025), and in 2021, patients from rural areas were more frequently associated with pulpitis or acute apical periodontitis, and patients from urban areas were associated more frequently with periodontal emergencies (p = 0.042). Pediatric patients with ages between 7 and 12 years old, who lived in an urban environment were most affected. Teeth located in the lower and upper posterior dental arches were most affected, and pulpitis or acute apical periodontitis were the most common pathologies. Full article
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