Topic Editors

Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Biogeochemical of Soils (LEMiBiS), Institute of Agri-Food, Animal and Environmental Science (ICA3), Universidad de O’Higgins, San Fernando 3070000, Chile
Group of Interactions between Soils, Plants and Microorganisms, Departament of Food Biotechnology, Instituto de la Grasa (IG-CSIC), 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Center of Plant, Soil Interaction and Natural Resources Biotechnology, Scientific and Biotechnological Bioresource Nucleus, BIOREN UFRO, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco 4811230, Chile
Institute of Agri-Food, Animal and Environmental Sciences (ICA3), Universidad de O’Higgins, San Fernando 3070-000, Chile

Waste Management through Composting: Benefits, New Insights and Challenges

Abstract submission deadline
30 April 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
30 June 2024
Viewed by
4147

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are composing a topic with the title “Waste Management through Composting: Benefits, New insights and Challenges”. This topic is based around the notion that most residues from domestical and agricultural origin are bio-waste, with high value for obtaining diverse end-products of interest. One of those is compost. For the production of compost, different technologies have been developed during the recent decades. Among these technologies, aerobic composting represents the most frequently used and studied operation, which has yielded many innovative ideas for improving the composting process and also optimizing the application of the respective valuated products as soil amendment. In this topic, we intend to offer a platform for presenting such innovative approaches and offering strategies for their optimization (e.g., the utilization of additives and microorganisms) and adaption for use in agriculture, as well as showing their applicability as tools for ecological restoration, soil remediation, or amelioration. In addition, we appreciate contributions discussing the use of compost for the elaboration of growing media and biofertilizers, as well as their potential application as C sequestration amendments in smart agriculture. We believe that this topic may be of interest to you, and thus we cordially invite you to submit a manuscript to this topic, and we look forward to your contribution.

Dr. Jorge Medina
Prof. Dr. Heike Knicker
Dr. Marcela Calabi-Floody
Dr. Humberto Aponte
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • bioformulation
  • carbon sequestration
  • growing media
  • organic amendments
  • optimization process
  • smart agriculture

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Fermentation
fermentation
3.7 3.7 2015 14.3 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Soil Systems
soilsystems
3.5 5.8 2017 27.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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25 pages, 7220 KiB  
Article
Opportunities and Barriers to Composting in a Municipal Context: A Case Study in São José Dos Campos, Brazil
by Vanessa Rodrigues Pereira and Fabiana Alves Fiore
Sustainability 2024, 16(8), 3359; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16083359 - 17 Apr 2024
Viewed by 292
Abstract
The management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a global challenge of a complex nature. The organic fraction of rapidly degrading MSW, which can be recycled via composting provided it is segregated at the source, is an incipient or non-existent practice in low- [...] Read more.
The management of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a global challenge of a complex nature. The organic fraction of rapidly degrading MSW, which can be recycled via composting provided it is segregated at the source, is an incipient or non-existent practice in low- and middle-income countries. This study aimed to identify the barriers and opportunities for composting MSW based on the perception of local stakeholders through a qualitative and quantitative exploratory case study in the municipality of São José dos Campos (SP). The study identified and interviewed local stakeholders engaged in composting in the territory, surveying the local market for organic agricultural inputs. Education, infrastructure, and social influence were the main factors that led to the decision to start composting. For home composting, the efficiency of generated waste diversion is from 42% to 59%, and management difficulties at the beginning of the practice are recurrent. Engaging people is the main challenge of community initiatives and 32% ended their composting activities due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Vermicomposting can be an opportunity to value organic waste in the local market. The insights gleaned from the perceptions of local stakeholders provide valuable input for more effective planning within a municipal composting scheme. Full article
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22 pages, 11118 KiB  
Article
Optimization and Experiment of Livestock and Poultry Manure Composting Equipment with Vented Heating
by Kailin Ren, Lide Su, Yong Zhang, Xiang He and Xuyang Cai
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 11353; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151411353 - 21 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1366
Abstract
As livestock and poultry farming expands in China, the generation of fecal waste has significantly increased. Inadequate waste management can contribute to environmental pollution. This study seeks to optimize small-scale composting systems to address the inefficiencies and the limited automation of traditional composting [...] Read more.
As livestock and poultry farming expands in China, the generation of fecal waste has significantly increased. Inadequate waste management can contribute to environmental pollution. This study seeks to optimize small-scale composting systems to address the inefficiencies and the limited automation of traditional composting equipment. We redesigned the mixing blades and refined the ventilation heating system, establishing an efficient mixing mechanism and an energy-saving ventilation heating system. A control system, incorporating Monitor and Control Generated System and Programmable logic Controller, was developed for real-time monitoring and adjustment capabilities, substantially enhancing automation levels. The optimization proved effective by reducing the composting cycle from 13 days to 11.5 days, increasing the GI value from 83% to 89%, and lowering the humidity from 8.9% to 8.1%. Full article
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16 pages, 2058 KiB  
Article
Evolution of Maize Compost in a Mediterranean Agricultural Soil: Implications for Carbon Sequestration
by Layla M. San-Emeterio, José M. De la Rosa, Heike Knicker, Rafael López-Núñez and José A. González-Pérez
Agronomy 2023, 13(3), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13030769 - 07 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1300
Abstract
Compost amendments, apart from improving fertility and the general characteristics of agricultural soils, have known implications for global C cycling and sequestration in soils. Their effects are usually assessed via the quantification of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, usually labile (fast) and recalcitrant [...] Read more.
Compost amendments, apart from improving fertility and the general characteristics of agricultural soils, have known implications for global C cycling and sequestration in soils. Their effects are usually assessed via the quantification of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, usually labile (fast) and recalcitrant (slow) pools, with varying intrinsic decomposition rates and distinct resident times. However, the real C-sequestration potential of organic additions to soil is still under discussion. In this study, a field trial and a lab incubation experiment were designed to study the C-sequestration mechanism in an agricultural Mediterranean soil. Soil with a history of C3 photosystem crop was amended with two maize composts from maize harvesting surpluses (C4 photosystem) with different maturity stages (AC: aged compost; NC: new, less mature compost). The evolution of SOM was monitored for 6 months using complementary analytical techniques, including analysis of stable C isotopes (IRMS), thermogravimetry (TG) and C-stock and priming effect (PE) modelling. Based on the natural C-isotope labelling, the proportion of new C was calculated. More than 50% of the C added to the soil with the compost was incorporated into the SOM in only 6 months. However, the application of maize compost did not always enhance soil C-sequestration capacity. The addition of compost caused a general PE, enhancing SOM decay and reducing the fast (labile) SOM mean residence time (MRT) (11.2 days). This was more pronounced with the addition of a higher dose of AC, causing a PE up to a 718%. On the other hand, a higher MRT (54.4 days) occurred in soils with NC applied, likely due to its deleterious effects, limiting heterotrophic activity. Despite that, the average MRT of the slow (recalcitrant) SOM pool was lower than usually reported. The application of higher doses of both composts generally showed greater MRT values compared to control (1.7 years vs. 3.8 and 2.9 years for NC and AC, respectively), leading to an increase in this more stable C pool and effective soil C sequestration. The results described in this work may help readers to better understand SOM dynamics and may be of use in designing appropriate management strategies for improving OM quantity and quality and to optimize C storage in Mediterranean soils. Full article
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