Topic Editors

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
Fairy Lake Botanical Garden, Shenzhen & Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518004, China

Plant Systematics and Taxonomy

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 October 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 December 2023)
Viewed by
36221

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the global awareness of environment and biodiversity at a historically unprecedented level and very active research momentum in phylogenetics, genomics and new species discovery, five MPDI journals, Diversity, Ecologies, IJPB, Plants, and JZBG, are launching a Topic in Plant Systematics and Taxonomy in 2022–2023, to promote research in this important field.

This Topic aims to collect high-quality research articles, short communications, and review articles in all fields of plant systematics and evolutionary biology: systematics, phylogenetics, phylogenomics, biosystematics, cytogenetics, taxonomy, morphology, evolutionary developmental biology, evolutionary genomics, chemical evolution, evolutionary ecology, paleobotany, and biogeography. The research subjects on the topic include plants, algae, fungi, and cyanobacteria.

Dr. Yin-Long Qiu
Dr. Yang Liu
Topic Editors

Keywords

  •  biodiversity
  •  phylogenomics
  •  biosystematics
  •  genomics
  •  new species
  •  algae and cyanobacteria
  •  taxonomy and nomenclature
  •  community phylogenetics
  •  floristic studies
  •  systematics
  •  taxonomy
  •  speciation and species concepts
  •  historical biogeography
  •  character evolution
  •  hybridization

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Diversity
diversity
2.4 3.1 2009 17.8 Days CHF 2600
Ecologies
ecologies
- - 2020 19.8 Days CHF 1000
International Journal of Plant Biology
ijpb
- 1.1 2010 14.4 Days CHF 1200
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens
jzbg
- - 2020 21.1 Days CHF 1000
Plants
plants
4.5 5.4 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700

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Published Papers (21 papers)

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24 pages, 1721 KiB  
Article
Updated List of Bryophytes from Cape Verde Archipelago
by Manuela Sim-Sim, Anabela Martins and Cesár Augusto Garcia
Diversity 2024, 16(4), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16040217 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 448
Abstract
The aim of the present study is to update the list of bryophytes in the Cape Verde archipelago, with a focus on its distinctive terrestrial biota. The research was carried out through a combination of herbarium collections revision and fieldwork conducted from 2016 [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study is to update the list of bryophytes in the Cape Verde archipelago, with a focus on its distinctive terrestrial biota. The research was carried out through a combination of herbarium collections revision and fieldwork conducted from 2016 to 2019. The revised list includes 185 bryophyte taxa (175 species, 5 subspecies, and 5 varieties) from 93 genera and 42 families. Notably, 8 taxa are endemic, and the inclusion of 35 new taxa further enriches the bryophyte diversity of the archipelago. The distribution of bryophyte taxa varies across islands, with Santo Antão, São Nicolau, and Fogo exhibiting particularly high diversity. Acrocarpous mosses are the most common growth form (58.4%), followed by pleurocarpous mosses, thalloid liverworts (15.1% each), and leafy liverworts (11.4%). In conclusion, this study provides valuable insights into the bryophyte diversity of southern Macaronesia enhancing our understanding of its unique flora and emphasizing the imperative need for conservation efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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17 pages, 4630 KiB  
Article
Detection of Hybrids in Willows (Salix, Salicaceae) Using Genome-Wide DArTseq Markers
by Radim J. Vašut, Markéta Pospíšková, Jan Lukavský and Jan Weger
Plants 2024, 13(5), 639; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13050639 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 525
Abstract
The genus Salix, comprising some 400–500 species, is important in various alluvial or wet habitats of the northern hemisphere. It is a promising crop for applications such as biomass production, biofuels, or environmental projects. Clear species delimitation is crucial in ecology, biotechnology, [...] Read more.
The genus Salix, comprising some 400–500 species, is important in various alluvial or wet habitats of the northern hemisphere. It is a promising crop for applications such as biomass production, biofuels, or environmental projects. Clear species delimitation is crucial in ecology, biotechnology, and horticulture. DArTseq markers, a genome-wide technique, were tested for species and hybrid identification. A total of 179 willow samples were analysed, including six species of Salix subgen. Salix and four species of Salix subgen. Vetrix, including those used in biomass crop production, representing important European taxa. Identification of species-specific markers, clustering analyses (principal coordinate analysis, neighbor-joining) and Bayesian methods (Structure) unambiguously identified putative hybrids. In addition to demonstrating the high efficiency of DArT-seq markers in identifying willow hybrids, we also opened-up new questions about hybridisation processes and systematics. We detected unidirectional hybridisation between S. alba and S. fragilis, forming backcross hybrids, and we rejected the hypothesis that S. fragilis does not occur naturally in Europe. Further, the isolated position of Salix triandra within the genus was confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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62 pages, 14735 KiB  
Article
The Fabaceae in Northeastern Mexico (Subfamily Caesalpinioideae, Mimosoideae Clade, Tribes Mimoseae, Acacieae, and Ingeae)
by Eduardo Estrada-Castillón, José Ángel Villarreal-Quintanilla, Gerardo Cuéllar-Rodríguez, Juan Antonio Encina-Domínguez, José Guadalupe Martínez-Ávalos, Arturo Mora-Olivo and Jaime Sánchez-Salas
Plants 2024, 13(3), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13030403 - 30 Jan 2024
Viewed by 889
Abstract
A synoptic compendium of the legumes of the Mimosoideae clade in northeastern Mexico is presented for the first time, including changes in their botanical nomenclature and retypification of genera. Furthermore, based on new information recently published, the taxonomic limits of several new genera [...] Read more.
A synoptic compendium of the legumes of the Mimosoideae clade in northeastern Mexico is presented for the first time, including changes in their botanical nomenclature and retypification of genera. Furthermore, based on new information recently published, the taxonomic limits of several new genera segregated from Acacia (Acaciella, Mariosousa, Senegalia, and Vachellia) and Prosopis (Neltuma and Strombocarpa) are clarified and included. Based on field work, collection of botanical samples over the past 30 years, and reviewing botanical materials in national and international herbaria, we have completed the diversity of legumes of the Mimosoideae clade of northeastern Mexico. Three tribes (Acacieae, Ingeae, and Mimosaeae), 22 genera, 92 species, and 19 infraspecific categories were recorded. Only the genus Painteria is endemic to Mexico. Eighty-eight species are native to Mexico, and four are exotic: Acacia salicina, Neptunia prostrata, Neltuma chilensis and Albizia lebbeck. Twenty-eight species are endemic to Mexico, nine species are endemic to northeastern Mexico, and four species are endemic to only one state in Mexico. The 22 registered genera represent 44% and 65% of the generic flora of the Mimosoideae clade for Mexico and the planet, respectively, while the 92 species registered represent 3% and 18% of the species of the clade Mimosoideae for the planet and Mexico, respectively. According to the new nomenclature of legumes, the number of genera in the Mimosoideae clade in northern Mexico has increased from 19 to 24. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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14 pages, 7537 KiB  
Article
Friesodielsia parvimitra (Annonaceae), a New Species from Peninsular Thailand and a Note on F. argentea
by Jiratthi Satthaphorn, David M. Johnson and Charan Leeratiwong
Plants 2024, 13(2), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020189 - 10 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1044
Abstract
During botanical expeditions focused on the study of Annonaceae in Thailand, specimens resembling Friesodielsia glauca were collected from the lower part of peninsular Thailand but were believed to differ from that species in vegetative, flower, and fruit characters. A morphological investigation of the new [...] Read more.
During botanical expeditions focused on the study of Annonaceae in Thailand, specimens resembling Friesodielsia glauca were collected from the lower part of peninsular Thailand but were believed to differ from that species in vegetative, flower, and fruit characters. A morphological investigation of the new specimens and species complex was conducted. Specimens (including types of F. glauca and similar species collected from Thailand and adjacent regions) were examined in the following herbaria: A, BK, BM, BKF, E, K, KEP, KKU, L, PSU, QBG, SING, and US. As a consequence, the new species Friesodielsia parvimitra, endemic to peninsular Thailand, is described and illustrated. The conservation status of the new species was provisionally assessed as Critically Endangered (CR, B2ab(iii)) following the IUCN’s guidelines. In addition, F. argentea, previously regarded F. glauca, is reinstated here as a distinct species based on several morphological differences and is reported as a new record from Thailand. Photographs, line drawings, and a revised key to F. glauca and similar species are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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18 pages, 3415 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Grassland Plant Community Change with Elevation and Its Relationship with Environmental Factors in the Burqin Forest Region of the Altai Mountains
by Xi Zhang, Mao Ye, Xiaoting Pan, Qingzhi He, Weilong Chen, Guoyan Zeng and Miaomiao Li
Diversity 2023, 15(10), 1098; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15101098 - 22 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1253
Abstract
The change grassland plant communities demonstrate with elevation has been one of the hot issues in ecological research, and there remain many unsolved problems. In order to further elucidate the rules of grassland plant community change with elevation, this study took the Burqin [...] Read more.
The change grassland plant communities demonstrate with elevation has been one of the hot issues in ecological research, and there remain many unsolved problems. In order to further elucidate the rules of grassland plant community change with elevation, this study took the Burqin forest area as a research object, using field survey, redundancy analysis and grey correlation analysis to comprehensively assess the characteristics of change in grassland plant communities with elevation and the relationship of this evolution with environmental factors. The results showed that (1) the numbers of species, community biomass, community cover and community densities of grassland plant communities showed an “M” pattern with the increase in elevation. There were significant changes in the importance values and dominance of plants at different elevations; with increasing elevation, grassland plants became primarily dominated by cold-tolerant and well-adapted perennials. (2) The similarity coefficients of grassland plant communities at different elevations ranged from 0.06 to 0.62, i.e., from very dissimilar to moderately similar. (3) As the elevation increased, the Margalef species richness index, Shannon–Wiener diversity index, Simpson dominance index and Alatalo evenness index all showed an “M” pattern trend. (4) The degrees of correlation between temperature and precipitation and community biomass and species diversity were at a high level, and these were the most important environmental factors affecting the biomass and species diversity of grassland plant communities in the Burqin forest area. The results of this study can provide a theoretical basis for the rational utilization of grassland resources and for the sustainable development of grassland ecosystems in the Burqin forest area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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13 pages, 2587 KiB  
Article
Back to Linnaeus: Proper Botanical Naming of the Tetraploid Indian Acorus (Acoraceae), an Important Medicinal Plant
by Dmitry D. Sokoloff, Margarita V. Remizowa, Mikhail V. Skaptsov, Shrirang R. Yadav and Alexander N. Sennikov
Diversity 2023, 15(6), 785; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15060785 - 18 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1046
Abstract
The basal monocot genus Acorus comprises essential oil-producing plants widely used in traditional medicine in various countries, including India. Acorus calamus sensu lato is a polyploid complex where the essential oil composition, to some extent, depends on the ploidy level. The literature recognizes [...] Read more.
The basal monocot genus Acorus comprises essential oil-producing plants widely used in traditional medicine in various countries, including India. Acorus calamus sensu lato is a polyploid complex where the essential oil composition, to some extent, depends on the ploidy level. The literature recognizes diploids (in temperate Asia and North America), triploids (Asian in origin, naturalized elsewhere) and tetraploids (temperate to tropical Asia) at the rank of varieties of A. calamus. We show that the current use of the name A. calamus var. angustatus for the tetraploids is not properly justified. The earliest name based on the Asian material is A. calamus var. verus published in 1753 by Linnaeus. We justify the use of the Linnaean variety for tetraploids by selecting an epitype based on the material cultivated in Peninsular India, for which direct chromosome counts are provided. The name A. verus is available if the tetraploid cytotype is recognized at the species rank. We support earlier data on the importance of leaf anatomy for cytotype diagnostics in Acorus, but also show the limitations of the use of this approach. The growth pattern of the tropical Indian tetraploid material is discussed, and the evergreen nature of the accession studied here is documented. The exact chromosome number of the tetraploid Acorus requires further clarification. All metaphase plates examined here showed at least 44 chromosomes, but plates apparently showing more than 44 chromosomes were found as well. They may be explained by technical difficulties in counting chromosomes in Acorus. Alternatively, our data may indicate the occurrence of aneuploid mixoploidy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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22 pages, 6933 KiB  
Article
Inference of Ploidy Level in 19th-Century Historical Herbarium Specimens Reveals the Identity of Five Acorus Species Described by Schott
by Dmitry D. Sokoloff, Margarita V. Remizowa, Elena E. Severova and Alexander N. Sennikov
Diversity 2023, 15(6), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15060766 - 12 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1086
Abstract
Heinrich Wilhelm Schott (1794–1865) was one of the pioneering researchers in the taxonomy of the species-rich monocot family Araceae. He described numerous new plant species in various genera, including Acorus, which is currently segregated as a monogeneric family and order occupying a [...] Read more.
Heinrich Wilhelm Schott (1794–1865) was one of the pioneering researchers in the taxonomy of the species-rich monocot family Araceae. He described numerous new plant species in various genera, including Acorus, which is currently segregated as a monogeneric family and order occupying a position sister to the rest of the monocots. While describing his new species of Acorus, Schott mostly used characters that are currently considered of low, if any, taxonomic value. His descriptions lack some key characters including, for obvious reasons, chromosome numbers. Therefore, Schott’s species concepts cannot be properly interpreted according to the current understanding of the taxonomic diversity of Acorus, even though his species names must be examined for implementation of the principle of nomenclatural priority. The only way of resolving the taxonomic identity of Schott’s species names is through the identification of type specimens among historical herbarium collections, by inferring taxonomically significant characters that are missing in Schott’s descriptions. On the basis of herbarium collections of the Komarov Botanical Institute, St. Petersburg (LE), we were able to infer ploidy levels of the materials used by Schott to describe Acorus triqueter (diploid, Siberia), A. tatarinowii (tetraploid, China), A. nilaghirensis (tetraploid, India), A. griffithii (tetraploid, Bhutan), and A. commutatus (tetraploid, Bhutan). Leaf anatomy and pollen stainability were used as cytotype markers. All five species belong to the polymorphic Acorus calamus complex that comprises important medicinal plants. Detailed historical and nomenclatural analyses of Schott’s species names and herbarium collections are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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25 pages, 22807 KiB  
Article
Morphology, Taxonomy, Anatomy, and Palynology of the Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) Cultivation in Northern Thailand
by Chatchai Ngernsaengsaruay, Nisa Leksungnoen, Pichet Chanton, Tushar Andriyas, Pratchaya Thaweekun, Surasak Rueansri, Ratthapon Tuntianupong and Woottichai Hauyluek
Plants 2023, 12(11), 2105; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12112105 - 25 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4018
Abstract
In this paper, we present the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and palynology of Papaver somniferum. A detailed morphological description and illustrations of the species are provided, along with information about the identification, distribution, cultivation areas, habitats, pollinators, specimens examined, growing periods, phenology, etymology, [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and palynology of Papaver somniferum. A detailed morphological description and illustrations of the species are provided, along with information about the identification, distribution, cultivation areas, habitats, pollinators, specimens examined, growing periods, phenology, etymology, vernacular name, and uses. The species can be characterized as a glabrous and glaucous herb with unlobed or pinnately lobed leaves, and an amplexicaul base; variations in color and morphological characteristics of petals; and white filaments, occasionally purple with a white basal part, broadened at the apical part. Two rings of discontinuous and widely spaced collateral vascular bundles are recognized in the transverse section of the stems. The shape of epidermal cells on the adaxial surface is polygonal, while that on the abaxial surface is polygonal or irregular. The anticlinal cell walls of the epidermal cells on the adaxial surface are straight or slightly curved, while those on the abaxial surface are straight, slightly curved, sinuate, or strongly sinuate. The stomata are anomocytic and are confined to the lower epidermis. The stomatal density is 54–199/mm2 (with a mean of 89.29 ± 24.97). The mesophyll is not distinctly differentiated into palisade and spongy regions. Laticifers are found in the phloem areas of the stems and leaves. The pollen grains can be spheroidal or prolate spheroidal in shape, sometimes oblate spheroidal [polar axis (P) diameter/equatorial axis (E) diameter ratio = 0.99–1.12 (with a mean of 1.03 ± 0.03)]. The pollen aperture is tricolpate and the exine sculpturing is microechinate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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34 pages, 10550 KiB  
Article
Morphology, Taxonomy, Culm Internode and Leaf Anatomy, and Palynology of the Giant Reed (Arundo donax L.), Poaceae, Growing in Thailand
by Chatchai Ngernsaengsaruay, Buapan Puangsin, Nisa Leksungnoen, Somwang Khantayanuwong, Pichet Chanton, Thirawat Thaepthup, Paweena Wessapak, Rumrada Meeboonya, Piyawan Yimlamai, Kapphapaphim Wanitpinyo, Korawit Chitbanyong, Tushar Andriyas and Nattapon Banjatammanon
Plants 2023, 12(9), 1850; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12091850 - 30 Apr 2023
Viewed by 3067
Abstract
In this paper, we present the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and palynology of Arundo donax. A detailed morphological description and illustrations of the species are provided, along with information about the identification, distribution, the specimens examined, habitat and ecology, the International Union for [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and palynology of Arundo donax. A detailed morphological description and illustrations of the species are provided, along with information about the identification, distribution, the specimens examined, habitat and ecology, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) conservation assessment, phenology, etymology, vernacular name, and uses. The species can be distinguished by its large, tall rhizomatous perennial reed; cauline leaves; an open, large, plumose panicle inflorescence; subequal glumes as long as the spikelets; glabrous rachilla; all bisexual florets; and a lemma with a straight awn and with long white hairs outside below the middle part. In this study, two names were lectotypified: Arundo bifaria and A. bengalensis, which are synonyms of A. donax. The culm internodes in the transverse section have numerous vascular bundles scattered in the ground tissue, and the parenchyma cells have significantly lignified cell walls. Vascular bundles are composed of phloem and xylem and are enclosed in a continuous sclerenchymatous bundle sheath. The chloroplasts in the transverse section of the leaf blades are found only in the mesophyll cells but are absent in the bundle sheath cells, which indicates that it is a C3 grass. The leaves have stomata on both surfaces and are confined to the intercostal zones. The stomata are typically paracytic, with two lateral subsidiary cells placed parallel to the guard cells. The stomatal density is higher on the abaxial surface [450–839/mm2 (606.83 ± 72.71)] relative to the adaxial surface [286–587/mm2 (441.27 ± 50.72)]. The pollen grains are spheroidal or subspheroidal [polar axis length/equatorial axis length ratio (P/E ratio) = 0.89–1.16 (1.02 ± 0.07)] with a single pore surrounded by a faint annulus, and the exine sculpturing is granular. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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20 pages, 4606 KiB  
Article
Evolution and Classification of Musaceae Based on Male Floral Morphology
by Wandee Inta, Paweena Traiperm, Saroj Ruchisansakun, Steven B. Janssens, Unchera Viboonjun and Sasivimon C. Swangpol
Plants 2023, 12(8), 1602; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12081602 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2862
Abstract
Classification of the banana family (Musaceae) into three genera, Musa, Ensete and Musella, and infrageneric ranking are still ambiguous. Within the genus Musa, five formerly separated sections were recently merged into sections Musa and Callimusa based on seed morphology, molecular [...] Read more.
Classification of the banana family (Musaceae) into three genera, Musa, Ensete and Musella, and infrageneric ranking are still ambiguous. Within the genus Musa, five formerly separated sections were recently merged into sections Musa and Callimusa based on seed morphology, molecular data and chromosome numbers. Nevertheless, other key morphological characters of the genera, sections, and species have not been clearly defined. This research aims to investigate male floral morphology, classify members of the banana family based on overall similarity of morphological traits using 59 banana accessions of 21 taxa and make inferences of the evolutionary relationships of 57 taxa based on ITS, trnL-F, rps16 and atpB-rbcL sequences from 67 Genbank and 10 newly collected banana accessions. Fifteen quantitative characters were examined using principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis and 22 qualitative characters were analyzed by the Unweighted Pair Group Method with an Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA). The results showed that fused tepal morphology, median inner tepal shape and length of style supported the three clades of Musa, Ensete and Musella, while shapes of median inner tepal and stigma classified the two Musa sections. In conclusion, a combination of morphological characters of male flowers and molecular phylogenetics well support the taxonomic arrangement within the banana family and the Musa genus and assist in selection of characters to construct an identification key of Musaceae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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30 pages, 2629 KiB  
Article
Waldsteinia within Geum s.l. (Rosaceae): Main Aspects of Phylogeny and Speciation History
by Marina Protopopova, Vasiliy Pavlichenko, Victor Chepinoga, Alexander Gnutikov and Renat Adelshin
Diversity 2023, 15(4), 479; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15040479 - 24 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2136
Abstract
Waldsteinia is a small plant genus inhabiting the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. According to the latest revisions, Waldsteinia is included in Geum. We have obtained a phylogenetic reconstruction based on the nuclear (ITS) and plastid (trnL-trnF) DNA to [...] Read more.
Waldsteinia is a small plant genus inhabiting the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. According to the latest revisions, Waldsteinia is included in Geum. We have obtained a phylogenetic reconstruction based on the nuclear (ITS) and plastid (trnL-trnF) DNA to understand the phylogenetic structure of Waldsteinia and its relationships with other taxa of Geum s.l. Phylogenetic analysis based on the joint ITS + trnL-trnF dataset demonstrated Waldsteinia monophyly. The phylogenetic relationships of Waldsteinia species were better explained by their geographical distribution than their morphology. Hence, Euro-Siberian, Northeast Asian, and North American phylogeographic groups were distinguished, with East Asia having been suggested as the place of Waldsteinia origin. Considering the incongruence in W. geoides (a type species) position on the plastid and nuclear DNA trees, together with the discrepancy between the species morphology and its location on the plastid DNA tree, a hybrid origin was suggested for this species. Despite the fact that the position of W. maximowicziana is still not fully resolved, we support the point of view that claims it should be separated from the W. ternata aggregate (traditionally including W. trifolia, W. ternata s.str., and W. maximowicziana) and considered a separate species. The American W. doniana, W. fragarioides, and W. lobata belong to a single maternal lineage, but the observed genetic differences are too small to serve as a convincing argument for species segregation, so their relationships still remain unresolved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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11 pages, 299 KiB  
Review
Phylogeny and Systematics of Sassafras (Lauraceae), an Interesting Genus with Disjunct Distributions in Eastern North America and East Asia
by Yunyan Zhang, Jingbo Zhou, David Y. P. Tng, Shuang Wang, Ying Wang, Ye Peng, Hong Liu and Zhongsheng Wang
Plants 2023, 12(6), 1419; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12061419 - 22 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1658
Abstract
The Lauraceae is a family of the order Laurales, with 2500–3000 species comprising 50 genera, mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests. Up to two decades ago, the systematic classification of the Lauraceae was based on floral morphology, but molecular phylogenetic [...] Read more.
The Lauraceae is a family of the order Laurales, with 2500–3000 species comprising 50 genera, mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forests. Up to two decades ago, the systematic classification of the Lauraceae was based on floral morphology, but molecular phylogenetic approaches have made tremendous advances in elucidating tribe- and genus-level relationships within the family in recent decades. Our review focused on the phylogeny and systematics of Sassafras, a genus of three species with highly disjunct distributions in eastern North America and East Asia, whose tribe affiliation within the Lauraceae has long been controversial. By synthesizing information on the floral biology and molecular phylogeny of Sassafras, this review aimed to explore the position of Sassafras within the Lauraceae, and to provide suggestions and implications for future phylogenetic studies. Our synthesis highlighted Sassafras as a transitional type between Cinnamomeae and Laureae with a closer genetic relationship with Cinnamomeae, as revealed by molecular phylogenetic evidence, while it shares many similar characteristics with Laureae in morphology. We therefore discovered that several molecular and morphological methods should be concurrently considered to illuminate the phylogeny and systematics of Sassafras in Lauraceae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
13 pages, 1425 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Yam (Dioscorea Species) Germplasm Using Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) Molecular Markers
by Anne A. Owiti, Joel L. Bargul, George O. Obiero and Evans N. Nyaboga
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2023, 14(1), 299-311; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijpb14010025 - 15 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1632
Abstract
Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is an important food security crop with economic, nutritional, and medicinal value. It is a source of carbohydrates for millions of people in tropical and sub-tropical regions of Africa, Asia, South America, the Caribbean, and the South Pacific Islands. [...] Read more.
Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is an important food security crop with economic, nutritional, and medicinal value. It is a source of carbohydrates for millions of people in tropical and sub-tropical regions of Africa, Asia, South America, the Caribbean, and the South Pacific Islands. Determining the appropriate parents for breeding programs is the most important decision that plant breeders must make to maximize genetic variability and produce excellent recombinant varieties. However, adequate genetic diversity and the population structure of yam accessions in Kenya are not available to guide accurate selection of parents for breeding. In the present study, 25 start-codon-targeted (SCoT) molecular markers were used to determine the genetic diversity and population structure among 20 yam accessions grown in Kenya. A total of 294 fragments were amplified, of which 95% were polymorphic with an average of 11.16 polymorphic fragments per primer. The polymorphic information content (PIC) value and primer resolving power (Rp) of 0.58 and 5.91, respectively, revealed high genetic diversity among the accessions. A dendrogram based on the unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means (UPGMA) grouped the 20 yam accessions into two clusters at 0.61 genetic similarity coefficients. Bayesian structure analysis revealed the existence of three subpopulations and some admixed accessions. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed a variance of 60% within the subpopulations and 40% among the subpopulations. The high degree of genetic diversity in the yam accessions successfully exhibited by SCoT molecular markers may serve as a valuable aid to widen the genetic base in yam breeding programs. The selection and hybridization of parental lines from the different clusters and sub-clusters identified could provide a foundation and could be exploited for yam breeding and variety development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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1 pages, 168 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Fici et al. An Updated Checklist of the Genus Capparis L. (Capparaceae) in Vietnam, including a New Species from Hon Tre Island. Plants 2022, 11, 3402
by Silvio Fici, Leonid V. Averyanov and Danh Thuong Sy
Plants 2023, 12(5), 1055; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12051055 - 27 Feb 2023
Viewed by 598
Abstract
The authors would like to report that the following corrections have been made to the original article [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
20 pages, 1326 KiB  
Article
An Update of the Cenchrinae (Poaceae, Panicoideae, Paniceae) and a New Genus for the Subtribe to Clarify the Dubious Position of a Species of Panicum L.
by Carolina Delfini, Sandra S. Aliscioni, Juan M. Acosta, José F. Pensiero and Fernando O. Zuloaga
Plants 2023, 12(4), 749; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12040749 - 07 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
Subtribe Cenchrinae, so-called as the “bristle clade”, is a monophyletic group of panicoid grasses characterized by having sterile branches or bristles on the inflorescences in most of its species. Within this subtribe is also placed Panicum antidotale Retz., an “incertae sedis” species of [...] Read more.
Subtribe Cenchrinae, so-called as the “bristle clade”, is a monophyletic group of panicoid grasses characterized by having sterile branches or bristles on the inflorescences in most of its species. Within this subtribe is also placed Panicum antidotale Retz., an “incertae sedis” species of Panicum L. which lacks bristles along the inflorescence. In this study, we present an update of the subtribe Cenchrinae based on molecular, morphological, and anatomical evidence to clarify the systematic position of P. antidotale in the Cenchrinae, excluding it from Panicum and establishing it in a new genus (i.e., Janochloa Zuloaga & Delfini); the morphological features distinguishing the new genus from other closely related taxa are properly discussed and an identification key to the 24 genera recognized within Cenchrinae is presented. We also add American Setaria species, not tested before, of subgenera Paurochaetium and Reverchoniae, discussing the position of these taxa in actual phylogeny of the genus as well as defining placements in the tree of Setaria species that were imprecisely located in previous analyses. A comparison with the results from other studies, comments on Stenotaphrum Trin. and a brief discussion on conflicting placements in Cenchrus and related taxa, and of Acritochaete Pilg. are also included. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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21 pages, 3940 KiB  
Article
The Curious Case of Fritillaria sonnikovae (Liliaceae) in South Siberia: New Insights into Its Origin and Phylogeny
by Marina Protopopova, Denis Sandanov, Vasiliy Pavlichenko, Inessa Selyutina and Nikolay Stepanov
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020193 - 31 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1899
Abstract
Fritillaria Tourn. ex L. is a genus of Liliaceae including a little more than 150 species occurring in the temperate Holarctic. Fritillaria sonnikovae Shaulo & Erst is the most recently described Siberian species in the genus. In the affinity section of the F. sonnikovae [...] Read more.
Fritillaria Tourn. ex L. is a genus of Liliaceae including a little more than 150 species occurring in the temperate Holarctic. Fritillaria sonnikovae Shaulo & Erst is the most recently described Siberian species in the genus. In the affinity section of the F. sonnikovae diagnosis, only F. dagana Turcz. and F. roylei Hook. are mentioned. Our study is an original attempt to shed light on the F. sonnikovae origin and its evolutionary relationships with other Fritillaria using nuclear (ITS) and plastid (matK + rps16 + trnH-psbA) DNA markers. Our results showed that F. sonnikovae together with F. dagana and F. maximowiczii Freyn belongs to the North Asian lineage of the Liliorhiza subgenus and produced no evidence supporting relationship between F. sonnikovae and F. roylei. Monophyly of Fritillaria sonnikovae was not reliably confirmed in our study since its close affinity with F. maximowiczii was demonstrated by phylogenetic analysis and morphology. Fritillaria dagana was shown to be a sister to the F. maximowiczii + F. sonnikovae group. Most authors of the present study suggest considering F. sonnikovae as a synonym for F. maximowiczii. In this view, F. sonnikovae may be considered a narrow endemic and one of the light-perianth morphs of F. maximowiczii, which has emerged in the Western Sayan and remained there as a tertiary relict. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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16 pages, 22361 KiB  
Article
Phylogenetic Relationships in the Group Caespitosa of Paspalum L. (Poaceae, Panicoideae, Paspaleae)
by Carolina Delfini, Juan M. Acosta, Sandra S. Aliscioni, Vinicius Castro Souza and Fernando O. Zuloaga
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020134 - 18 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1077
Abstract
The informal group Caespitosa of Paspalum L. comprises 13–15 perennial species that are able to tolerate extreme climatic stresses, such as prolonged droughts, floods, and saltwater. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have suggested that the Caespitosa might not be monophyletic, but they did not [...] Read more.
The informal group Caespitosa of Paspalum L. comprises 13–15 perennial species that are able to tolerate extreme climatic stresses, such as prolonged droughts, floods, and saltwater. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have suggested that the Caespitosa might not be monophyletic, but they did not analyze a large enough sample of taxa for a meaningful conclusion. In this study, we evaluate the phylogeny of the genus Paspalum using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian inference based on four DNA regions (ETS, ndhF, rpl16, and trnH-psbA) and increasing the number of sampled species (i.e., a total of 13 taxa and 40 new accessions of the group Caespitosa). Our main objective was to analyze the positions of Caespitosa taxa, assuming a priori that they do not represent a natural group as traditionally circumscribed. Our findings showed the Caespitosa species distributed in seven morphologically distinct clades and correlated with members of the informal groups Alma, Corcovadensia, Dissecta, Lachnea, Macrophylla, Notata, Paniculata, and Rupestria. Clades containing Caespitosa taxa were characterized based on morphological, anatomical, and cytological evidence, one of which was associated with geographic isolation. A comparison with results from other studies, a brief discussion on the group Macrophylla, which our analyses showed to be polyphyletic, and comments on the need for future molecular studies in Paspalum are also included. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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16 pages, 4429 KiB  
Article
Revision on the Genus Paris in Thailand, with a New Species Paris siamensis
by Saroj Ruchisansakun, Supajit Sraphet, Chatchai Yothawut, Chompunooch Thamanukornsri, Nawarat Suksee, Panida Kongsawadworakul, Nattaya Srisawad, Nicha Thawara, Puangpaka Umpunjun, Supaporn Rodpradit, Winai Sangkaew and Kanokporn Triwitayakorn
Plants 2023, 12(3), 430; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12030430 - 17 Jan 2023
Viewed by 2191
Abstract
The genus Paris is an important and confusing taxon due to high variation within species, and differences between species are sometimes difficult to delimit. Thus, the status of some taxa has changed over time. To clarify the status of Paris species for plant [...] Read more.
The genus Paris is an important and confusing taxon due to high variation within species, and differences between species are sometimes difficult to delimit. Thus, the status of some taxa has changed over time. To clarify the status of Paris species for plant conservation and effective management of this genus in Thailand, we performed an intensive survey in northern Thailand, studied morphological characteristics, and constructed a molecular phylogenic tree, which we compared to recently published results of this genus. Our results indicate that there are two species in Thailand: P. yunnanensis and a new species, P. siamensis. Detailed descriptions, illustrations, and the phylogenetic position of these two species are provided here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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18 pages, 4544 KiB  
Article
Systematics and Phylogenetic Placement of Panicum L. Species within the Melinidinae Based on Morphological, Anatomical, and Molecular Data (Poaceae, Panicoideae, Paniceae)
by Carolina Delfini, Diego L. Salariato, Sandra S. Aliscioni and Fernando O. Zuloaga
Plants 2023, 12(2), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12020399 - 14 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1797
Abstract
Generic boundaries of the African species Panicum deustum Thunb., Panicum trichocladum Hack. ex K. Schum., and Panicum vollesenii Renvoize are analyzed and compared with related genera of the tribe Paniceae and the subtribe Melinidinae. Based on morphological (vegetative and reproductive characters including habit, [...] Read more.
Generic boundaries of the African species Panicum deustum Thunb., Panicum trichocladum Hack. ex K. Schum., and Panicum vollesenii Renvoize are analyzed and compared with related genera of the tribe Paniceae and the subtribe Melinidinae. Based on morphological (vegetative and reproductive characters including habit, ligules, inflorescence, spikelets, and ornamentation of the upper anthecium), anatomical (transverse section of leaves), and molecular data (three chloroplast markers), a new genus is proposed for P. deustum, while P. trichocladum and P. vollesenii are transferred to the genus Megathyrsus (Pilg.) B.K. Simon & S.W.L. Jacobs. The phylogenetic position of both taxa within the Melinidinae and their morphological affinities with other genera of the subtribe are also discussed. Additional studies on the Melinidinae will clarify the systematic position of the genera that are still in a doubtful position within the subtribe, such as Eriochloa and Urochloa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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16 pages, 3089 KiB  
Article
Coalescent-Based Species Delimitation in Herbaceous Bamboos (Bambusoideae, Olyreae) from Eastern Brazil: Implications for Taxonomy and Conservation in a Group with Weak Morphological Divergence Coupled with Low Genetic Diversity
by João Paulo S. Vieira, Alessandra Selbach-Schnadelbach, Marcos Braz, Patrícia L. Ribeiro, Cássio van den Berg and Reyjane P. Oliveira
Plants 2023, 12(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12010107 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1492
Abstract
Species delimitation in herbaceous bamboos has been complex and, in some genera, a great part of its diversity has been confirmed only based on genetic information, as is the case of the genus Raddia. It includes nine species, all occurring in Brazil, but [...] Read more.
Species delimitation in herbaceous bamboos has been complex and, in some genera, a great part of its diversity has been confirmed only based on genetic information, as is the case of the genus Raddia. It includes nine species, all occurring in Brazil, but only R. portoi predominates in dry forests of the Northeast associated with the Caatinga phytogeographic domain. This species is morphologically close to R. angustifolia, which is known for a single location in the Atlantic Forest in Southern Bahia, and is considered to be threatened by extinction. Besides problems with taxonomic focus, actions for its conservation are complicated because it is not certain if it must be considered an independent species or included in the more widespread R. portoi. In this study, we used coalescent multispecies (MSC) theory approaches combined with genetic structure analyses in an attempt to delimit these two species. Different analyses were congruent and the species delimitation using MSC inferred distinct lineages supporting their recognition as two species. These results solved the taxonomic doubts and also showed the power of these approaches to delimit species as lineages, even in groups with weak morphological divergence and low genetic variability, and also impacting our knowledge for conservation purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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16 pages, 1028 KiB  
Article
An Updated Checklist of the Genus Capparis L. (Capparaceae) in Vietnam, including a New Species from Hon Tre Island
by Silvio Fici, Leonid V. Averyanov and Danh Thuong Sy
Plants 2022, 11(23), 3402; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11233402 - 06 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1542 | Correction
Abstract
The Indochinese Peninsula is a main center of speciation of Capparis, but the taxonomic treatment of the genus is still critical in this area. With regard to Vietnam, a discordant number of species was recorded by different authors during the last century, [...] Read more.
The Indochinese Peninsula is a main center of speciation of Capparis, but the taxonomic treatment of the genus is still critical in this area. With regard to Vietnam, a discordant number of species was recorded by different authors during the last century, whereas various new species have been recently described. An updated checklist of the intrageneric taxa occurring in the country is here presented, including a new species from the island of Hon Tre, Khanh Hoa Province. The genus comprises in Vietnam 37 species, 9 subspecies and 3 varieties, all belonging to Capparis sect. Monostichocalyx. The study area, with 10 endemic species, is confirmed as one of the hotspots of the genus. Three lectotypes are also selected. The new species here described and illustrated, C. oxycarpa, is related to C. pranensis, differing in the few-flowered subumbels, narrower sepals, smaller petals, longer filaments and smaller, apiculate fruit; its affinities with related taxa and conservation status are discussed, and data on its ecology and phenology are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Plant Systematics and Taxonomy)
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