Topic Editors

Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Gachon University, Incheon 21936, Republic of Korea
Prof. Dr. Ki-Hun Cho
Department of Physical Therapy, Korea National University of Transportation, Jeungpyeong 27909, Republic of Korea
Graduate School of Integrative Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam 13488, Republic of Korea
Dr. Hye-Rim Suh
Department of Physical Therapy, Baekseok University, Cheonan-si 31065, Republic of Korea

New Advances in Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy

Abstract submission deadline
10 December 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
10 February 2025
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1782

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical therapy and occupational therapy have seen remarkable growth in recent years due to technological breakthroughs, novel therapeutic approaches, and a deeper understanding of biomechanics. This Topic aims to be a platform for the dissemination of pioneering research, pushing the boundaries of traditional practices and fostering dynamic idea exchange.

Our focus includes diverse therapeutic approaches such as manual therapy, electrotherapy, exercise regimens, soft tissue mobilization, and taping methodologies. Authors are invited to explore these interventions' application methods and effects on patients with various conditions. We aim to provide practitioners with a comprehensive understanding of interventional efficacy in diverse clinical scenarios using empirical evidence and case studies.

We also seek submissions on innovative clinical measurement methods, encouraging insights into assessing patient progress, functional outcomes, and treatment efficacy using advanced technologies or interdisciplinary approaches.

Researchers worldwide are invited to contribute to topics like rehabilitation techniques, technological interventions, evidence-based practices, and interdisciplinary collaborations. Our goal is to showcase the advancements revolutionizing physical therapy and ultimately enhancing patient outcomes.

Join us on this journey to propel the field forward through collaboration and knowledge exchange. Your contributions will enrich academic discourse and directly impact global patient care. We eagerly await your submissions.

Best Regards,
Dr. Hwi-Young Cho
Prof. Dr. Ki-Hun Cho
Dr. Suk-Chan Hahm
Dr. Hye-Rim Suh
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • manual therapy
  • exoskeleton
  • taping
  • soft tissue mobilization
  • musculoskeletal disorders
  • neurological disorders
  • muscle activity
  • balance
  • gait
  • physical therapy

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Journal of Personalized Medicine
jpm
3.4 2.6 2011 17.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Medicina
medicina
2.6 3.6 1920 19.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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10 pages, 2968 KiB  
Article
Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation with Taping on Wrist Spasticity, Strength, and Upper Extremity Function in Patients with Stroke: A Randomized Control Trial
by Kyoung-sim Jung, Jin-hwa Jung, Hwi-young Cho and Tae-sung In
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(8), 2229; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13082229 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 243
Abstract
Objective: Six months after the onset of stroke, over 60% of patients experience upper limb dysfunction, with spasticity being a major contributor alongside muscle weakness. This study investigated the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) with taping on wrist spasticity, strength, and [...] Read more.
Objective: Six months after the onset of stroke, over 60% of patients experience upper limb dysfunction, with spasticity being a major contributor alongside muscle weakness. This study investigated the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) with taping on wrist spasticity, strength, and upper extremity function in patients with stroke. Methods: In total, 40 patients with stroke were included and randomly divided into two groups: the TENS + taping (n = 20, age 52.4 ± 9.3 (range: 39 to 70)) and TENS (n = 20, age 53.5 ± 10.8 (range: 39 to 74)) groups. All subjects performed 30 sessions of task-related training, which included 10 min of postural control training and 20 min of task performance. Additionally, all subjects received TENS on the spastic muscle belly for 30 min before task-related training. In the TENS + taping group, taping was additionally applied to the forearm and wrist but not in the TENS group. The Modified Ashworth Scale was used to measure spasticity, and a handheld dynamometer was used to measure muscle strength. The Fugl–Meyer Assessment of Upper Extremity was used to evaluate the functional ability of the upper extremity. Results: In the TENS + taping group, spasticity and upper extremity function were significantly improved as compared to those in the TENS group (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference in muscle strength was observed between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the combination of TENS and taping for spasticity and function of the upper extremity was more effective in relieving the spasticity than TENS alone. Therefore, we suggest this combination as an additional treatment for spasticity and function of the upper extremity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy)
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13 pages, 1807 KiB  
Article
Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation with Gastrocnemius Strengthening on Foot Morphology in Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Yusik Choi, Sooyong Lee, Minhyuk Kim and Woonam Chang
Healthcare 2024, 12(7), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12070777 - 03 Apr 2024
Viewed by 319
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with gastrocnemius (GCM) strength exercise on foot morphology in patients with stroke. Herein, 31 patients with chronic stroke meeting the study criteria were enrolled and divided into two groups; 16 patients [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with gastrocnemius (GCM) strength exercise on foot morphology in patients with stroke. Herein, 31 patients with chronic stroke meeting the study criteria were enrolled and divided into two groups; 16 patients were randomized to the gastrocnemius neuromuscular electrical stimulation (GCMNMES) group, and 15 patients to the conventional neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CNMES) group. The GCMNMES group conducted GCM-strengthening exercise with NMES. CNMES group conducted NMES at paretic tibialis anterior muscle with ankle dorsiflexion movement. These patients underwent therapeutic interventions lasting 30 min/session, five times a week for 4 weeks. To analyze changes in foot morphology, 3D foot scanning was used, while a foot-pressure measurement device was used to evaluate foot pressure and weight-bearing area. In an intra-group comparison of 3D-foot-scanning results, the experimental group showed significant changes in longitudinal arch angle (p < 0.05), medial longitudinal arch angle (MLAA) (p < 0.01), transverse arch angle (TAA) (p < 0.01), rearfoot angle (RA) (p < 0.05), foot length (FL) (p < 0.05), foot width (FW) (p < 0.05), and arch height index (AHI) (p < 0.01) of the paretic side and in TAA (p < 0.05) and AHI (p < 0.05) of the non-paretic side. The CNMES group showed significant changes in TAA (p < 0.05) and FW (p < 0.05) of the paretic side and TAA (p < 0.05) and AHI (p < 0.05) of the non-paretic side. An inter-group comparison showed significant differences in MLAA (p < 0.05) and RA (p < 0.05) of the paretic side. In an intra-group comparison of foot pressure assessment, the experimental group showed significant differences in footprint area (FPA) (p < 0.05) of the paretic side and FPA symmetry (p < 0.05). The CNMES group showed a significant difference in only FPA symmetry (p < 0.05). An inter-group comparison showed no significant difference between the two groups (p < 0.05). Thus, NMES with GCM-strengthening exercises yielded positive effects on foot morphology in patients with stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy)
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12 pages, 748 KiB  
Article
The Approach of Physiotherapists in the Management of Patients with Persistent Pain and Comorbid Anxiety/Depression: Are There Any Differences between Male and Female Professionals?
by Michele Chiesa, Gregorio Nicolini and Massimiliano Buoli
Medicina 2024, 60(2), 292; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60020292 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 891
Abstract
Background and Objectives: Chronic pain is a prevalent condition that is frequently complicated by mood and anxiety disorders. The purpose of the present article is to identify differences in the management of patients with chronic pain and anxiety/mood disorders depending on the [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Chronic pain is a prevalent condition that is frequently complicated by mood and anxiety disorders. The purpose of the present article is to identify differences in the management of patients with chronic pain and anxiety/mood disorders depending on the physiotherapists’ gender. Materials and Methods: An ad hoc questionnaire was developed and sent to 327 physiotherapists by e-mail. The two groups identified by gender were compared by unpaired-sample t tests for continuous variables and χ2 tests for qualitative ones. A binary logistic regression was then performed with factors resulting as statistically significant in univariate analyses as independent variables and gender as a dependent one. Results: Female physiotherapists exhibited a higher level of confidence than male physiotherapists in administering continued physiotherapy for patients affected by Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) (p = 0.01), as well as for individuals who had previously engaged with a mental health professional (p = 0.01). Furthermore, female physiotherapists believed that pharmacotherapy was less associated with motor side effects (p < 0.01) and more frequently recognized the importance of training to identify affective disorders (p = 0.01) and the need for more education in mental health (p = 0.01). The binary logistic regression model confirmed that female professionals were less likely to work = freelance (p = 0.015) and were more confident in the receival of physiotherapy by patients with GAD (p = 0.05). Conclusions: Female physiotherapists compared to male ones seem to be more comfortable with patients affected by mental conditions and to be more aware of the need for training on mental health. Further studies are needed to confirm the results of the present study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic New Advances in Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy)
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