Topic Editors

Institute of Geographic Science and Natural Resources Research, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Dr. Zhe Xu
State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environment Information System, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Dr. Zong Wang
The College of Forestry, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100107, China

Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation

Abstract submission deadline
25 August 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
25 October 2024
Viewed by
5614

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests are the most important carbon pool in terrestrial ecosystems and store 80% of terrestrial carbon stocks (forest vegetation) and 40% of belowground carbon stocks (soil, humus and roots). Thus, slight changes in forest carbon pools could lead to significant impacts on atmospheric CO2 concentration, which in turn has strong positive feedback on climate warming. However, proper management and vegetation restoration are thought to be able to store more organic carbon in forests and, thus, to be able to mitigate climate change. This Topic aims to understand the mechanisms behind forest carbon sequestration and control and to clarify their roles in climate change mitigation. We invite submissions of studies on forest C cycling and its associated climate change mitigation. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Forest carbon formation processes and underlying mechanisms;
  • Forest quality and sink enhancement technology;
  • Forest carbon sink measurement and monitoring methods;
  • Forest carbon sink and climate change mitigation potential predictions;
  • Temporal and spatial dynamic variation characteristics and research methods of forest ecosystem carbon storage;
  • Future evolution trend of carbon storage in forest ecosystems.

Prof. Dr. Tianxiang Yue
Dr. Zhe Xu
Dr. Zong Wang
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • forest ecosystem carbon storage
  • future evolution
  • remote sensing
  • vegetation restoration
  • organic carbon stabilization
  • forest function shift
  • forest carbon pool
  • demographic rates

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Climate
climate
3.7 5.2 2013 19.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Forests
forests
2.9 4.5 2010 16.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Remote Sensing
remotesensing
5.0 7.9 2009 23 Days CHF 2700 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
20 pages, 10594 KiB  
Article
Considering the Joint Impact of Carbon Density Change and Land Use Change Is Crucial to Improving Ecosystem Carbon Stock Assessment in North China
Forests 2024, 15(1), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15010055 - 28 Dec 2023
Viewed by 578
Abstract
Carbon density change and land use change are important factors in the spatiotemporal evolution of ecosystem carbon stock. Accurately assessing regional carbon stock and analyzing its relationship with land use patterns and carbon density change are of great value to regional ecosystem protection [...] Read more.
Carbon density change and land use change are important factors in the spatiotemporal evolution of ecosystem carbon stock. Accurately assessing regional carbon stock and analyzing its relationship with land use patterns and carbon density change are of great value to regional ecosystem protection and sustainable social and economic development. In order to effectively evaluate the carbon stock in North China, this study divided the target area into 5 sub-regions, and a variety of methods were used to calculate the carbon density in each sub-region over different time periods. The classic InVEST model was selected to evaluate carbon stock evolution under changes in land use and carbon density from 2000 to 2015. The results show that the carbon stock in North China in 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015 were 1.301 × 1010 t, 1.325 × 1010 t, 1.332 × 1010 t and 1.366 × 1010 t, respectively, with a cumulative increase of 6.506 × 108 t. As two main factors, the land use type change and carbon density change showed different influences on the carbon stock of different regions and different ecosystems, but the former had a greater impact in North China during 2000–2015. Converting farmland to forest and grassland and converting bare land to grassland increased carbon stock, while converting farmland to building land reduced carbon stock. In addition, the carbon density of most land use types in each sub-region increased from 2000 to 2015, which further caused the increase in carbon stock. The carbon stock in North China had a significant spatial pattern of high in the east and low in the west, and this distribution pattern is closely related to land use. This research can provide scientific reference for land use management decision-making and sustainable carbon stock function in North China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 8723 KiB  
Article
Trends in Atmospheric CO2 Fertilization Effects with Stand Age Based on Tree Rings
Forests 2023, 14(12), 2441; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14122441 - 14 Dec 2023
Viewed by 599
Abstract
The increase in global carbon emissions has intensified the effects of CO2 fertilization on the carbon cycle. CO2 fertilization is shaped by several factors, including the physiological differences among trees of varied forest ages and types, as well as the influence [...] Read more.
The increase in global carbon emissions has intensified the effects of CO2 fertilization on the carbon cycle. CO2 fertilization is shaped by several factors, including the physiological differences among trees of varied forest ages and types, as well as the influence of different climatic conditions. It is essential to investigate the differences in CO2 fertilization effects across diverse climate zones and delve into the association between these effects and forest age and type. Such exploration will deepen our knowledge of forest responses to environmental changes. This study used annual ring width data from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank, employing the generalized additive mixed models and the Random Forest model to discern the pattern of the CO2 fertilization effect concerning forest age in the Northern Hemisphere. This study also explored the variations in the effect of CO2 fertilization across unique climate zones and the disparities among various forest types within the same climatic zone. The results indicated a link between forest age and the CO2 fertilization effect: it tends to increase in sapling forests and middle-aged forests and diminish in mature forests. Warmer, drier environments had a more marked effect of increased CO2 on tree fertilization. Additionally, coniferous forests demonstrated a more substantial CO2 fertilization effect than broadleaf forests, and deciduous needle-leaf forests surpassed evergreen needle-leaf forests in this regard. This research is pivotal in understanding the shifting patterns of CO2 fertilization effects and how forests respond to atmospheric changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2825 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Characteristics and Environmental Interpretation of Vegetation Restoration in Burned Areas of the Dry Valleys of Southwest China
Forests 2023, 14(11), 2190; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14112190 - 03 Nov 2023
Viewed by 549
Abstract
Fire is a common natural disturbance in forest ecosystems and plays an important role in subsequent vegetation patterns. Based on the spatial sequence method, adopted as an alternative to the time successional sequence method, we selected burned areas in different locations in the [...] Read more.
Fire is a common natural disturbance in forest ecosystems and plays an important role in subsequent vegetation patterns. Based on the spatial sequence method, adopted as an alternative to the time successional sequence method, we selected burned areas in different locations in the Anning River Basin, which encompasses typical dry valleys. Quadrat surveys and quantitative classification were used to identify and classify the vegetation and distribution pattern and to carry out environmental interpretation during the natural restoration process after a forest fire. The results showed the following: (1) in the early stage of natural recovery after a forest fire disturbance, the vegetation community could be divided into seven community types, and Quercus guyavaefolia H. Leveille (Qg) was the dominant species in the community; (2) the vegetation samples could be divided into five ecological types, and the classification and distribution pattern of community types in this region changed most notably with altitude; and (3) a detrended correspondence analysis could be used to accurately classify vegetation community types, while a detrended canonical correspondence analysis could reveal the relationships between species and environmental factors. This study provides a scientific basis for guiding the restoration of ecosystem structural stability and biodiversity in burned areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 3310 KiB  
Article
Influence of Phoebe bournei (Hemsl.) Replanting on Soil Carbon Content and Microbial Processes in a Degraded Fir Forest
Forests 2023, 14(11), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14112144 - 28 Oct 2023
Viewed by 879
Abstract
Replanting is a widely used method for improving the health and carbon sequestration capacity of degraded forests. However, its impact on soil carbon pools remains controversial. This study investigated the effects of replanting broadleaf Phoebe bournei (Hemsl.) Yang in a typical degraded fir [...] Read more.
Replanting is a widely used method for improving the health and carbon sequestration capacity of degraded forests. However, its impact on soil carbon pools remains controversial. This study investigated the effects of replanting broadleaf Phoebe bournei (Hemsl.) Yang in a typical degraded fir forest. Soil carbon content, nutrient levels, and microbial community structure and function were measured at 0, 5, 8, and 12 years after replanting. The degraded fir forests were originally limited in nitrogen and phosphorus. Phoebe bournei replanting significantly increased soil total carbon but reduced total nitrogen and phosphorus levels, resulting in increased soil carbon:nitrogen, carbon:phosphorus, and nitrogen:phosphorus ratios. Microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus were all significantly reduced, whereas microbial carbon:phosphorus and nitrogen:phosphorus ratios were enhanced. Enzyme activities related to nutrient cycling and carbon decomposition (acidic invertase, polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, urase, nitrate reductase, and acidic phosphatase activities) were significantly lowered by replanting. Microbial richness and diversity significantly increased, and microbial community composition changed significantly due to replanting. Structural equation modeling revealed the significant role of total phosphorus in microbial biomass, microbial community composition, and enzyme activity, highlighting it as the main factor accelerating soil carbon accumulation. Network analysis identified Leifsonia, Bradyrhizobium, and Mycolicibacterium members as key microbial players in the soil carbon cycle. In summary, P. bournei replanting exacerbated soil phosphorus deficiency, leading to a decrease in soil microbial biomass and changes in community structure, reduced nutrient cycling and carbon-decomposition-related enzyme activities, less litter decomposition, and increased organic carbon accumulation. These findings demonstrate the importance of nutrient limitation in promoting soil carbon accumulation and offer new insights for soil carbon regulation strategies in forestry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2160 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Nitrogen Addition Could Modify Degradation of Soil Organic Matter through Changes in Soil Enzymatic Activity in a Natural Secondary Forest
Forests 2023, 14(10), 2049; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14102049 - 13 Oct 2023
Viewed by 645
Abstract
Soil extracellular enzymes play a key role in mediating the degradation of soil organic matter, but little is understood as to how the pattern of soil extracellular enzymes could be altered by nitrogen (N) addition. In this study, the effects of N addition [...] Read more.
Soil extracellular enzymes play a key role in mediating the degradation of soil organic matter, but little is understood as to how the pattern of soil extracellular enzymes could be altered by nitrogen (N) addition. In this study, the effects of N addition (started from 2006, four treatments: control, 0 g N·m–2·yr–1; low N addition, 2.5 g N·m–2·yr–1; high N addition, 5.0 g N·m–2·yr–1) on soil extracellular enzymes and microbial biomass in a natural secondary forest of Northeastern China. The results showed that the activity of urease, sucrase, peroxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosidase decreased with N addition, and the activity of acid phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase increased significantly with N addition. Soil total N, temperature at 5 cm soil depth, pH value, microbial biomass carbon and microbial biomass N were the key factors affecting soil enzyme activity. In summary, the enzyme activity related to soil organic matter degradation shows a decreasing trend under N addition. The results suggest that the increase in N deposition will slow down the degradation of soil organic matter in natural secondary forest, which is more conducive to the accumulation of organic matter in the soil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 29263 KiB  
Article
Urban Carbon Price Forecasting by Fusing Remote Sensing Images and Historical Price Data
Forests 2023, 14(10), 1989; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14101989 - 03 Oct 2023
Viewed by 857
Abstract
Under the strict carbon emission quota policy in China, the urban carbon price directly affects the operation of enterprises, as well as forest carbon sequestration. As a result, accurately forecasting carbon prices has been a popular research topic in forest science. Similar to [...] Read more.
Under the strict carbon emission quota policy in China, the urban carbon price directly affects the operation of enterprises, as well as forest carbon sequestration. As a result, accurately forecasting carbon prices has been a popular research topic in forest science. Similar to stock prices, urban carbon prices are difficult to forecast using simple models with only historical prices. Fortunately, urban remote sensing images containing rich human economic activity information reflect the changing trend of carbon prices. However, properly integrating remote sensing data into carbon price forecasting has not yet been investigated. In this study, by introducing the powerful transformer paradigm, we propose a novel carbon price forecasting method, called MFTSformer, to uncover information from urban remote sensing and historical price data through the encoder–decoder framework. Moreover, a self-attention mechanism is used to capture the intrinsic characteristics of long-term price data. We conduct comparison experiments with four baselines, ablation experiments, and case studies in Guangzhou. The results show that MFTSformer reduces errors by up to 52.24%. Moreover, it outperforms the baselines in long-term accurate carbon price prediction (averaging 15.3%) with fewer training resources (it converges rapidly within 20 epochs). These findings suggest that the effective MFTSformer can offer new insights regarding AI to urban forest research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4725 KiB  
Article
Spatial Heterogeneity of Total and Labile Soil Organic Carbon Pools in Poplar Agroforestry Systems
Forests 2023, 14(9), 1869; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14091869 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 930
Abstract
Agroforestry systems are considered effective methods of carbon sequestration. In these systems, most of the carbon is stored in the soil, and the pattern of tree planting can influence the spatial distribution of organic matter input into the soil. However, limited information is [...] Read more.
Agroforestry systems are considered effective methods of carbon sequestration. In these systems, most of the carbon is stored in the soil, and the pattern of tree planting can influence the spatial distribution of organic matter input into the soil. However, limited information is available about the extent of this influence. In this study, the horizontal and vertical distributions of soil organic carbon (SOC) and labile fractions were investigated in four planting systems: a pure poplar (Populus deltoides cv. “35”) planting system, a wide-row (14 m spacing) poplar and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) agroforestry system, a narrow-row (7 m spacing) poplar and wheat agroforestry system, and a pure wheat field. The results showed that although the poplar system had the highest vegetation biomass (147.50 t ha−1), the agroforestry systems overall had higher SOC contents than the pure poplar system and wheat fields. Especially in the wide-row agroforestry system, the SOC, readily oxidizable carbon, and dissolved organic carbon contents were, respectively, 25.3%, 42.4%, and 99.3% higher than those of the pure poplar system and 60.3%, 148.7%, and 6.3% higher than those of the wheat field in a 1 m soil profile, and it also had the highest fine root biomass. However, the microbial biomass carbon content was highest in the pure poplar system. The SOC of the three poplar planting systems was spatially heterogeneous, with the highest values occurring at 1.5 m in the narrow-row systems and within the tree rows in the wide-row system, similar to the distribution of fine root biomass. Additionally, we found that the larger the diameter at the breast height of the trees, the greater their positive effect on SOC at greater distances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Forest Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop