Topic Editors

Forschungszentrum Jülich, IBG-2: Plant Science, Wilhelm-Johnen-Straße, 52428 Jülich, Germany
Department of Life and Environmental Sciences (DiSVA), University of Cagliari, 09123 Cagliari, Italy

The Effect of Climate Change on Crops and Natural Ecosystems, 2nd Volume

Abstract submission deadline
31 March 2025
Manuscript submission deadline
31 July 2025
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3174

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the successful completion of Volume I of “The Effect of Climate Change on Crops and Natural Ecosystems” and the great interest in this research topic, we are pleased to announce the launch of Volume II. In this Topic, the influence of climate change on the growth, yield and quality of crops will be considered. This includes the influence of long-term climate changes as well as severe weather events such as periods of drought, heat and flooding due to heavy rain. Furthermore, methods and trials will be described to make crop production under field conditions more resilient to weather extremes. Answers to the questions related to this topic are essential for sustainable crop production in the future.

Dr. Arnd Jürgen Kuhn
Dr. Giuseppe Fenu
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • resilience
  • crops
  • weather extremes
  • plant growth
  • crop quality
  • adapted cultivation methods
  • field conditions
  • drought
  • heat
  • heavy rain
  • flooding

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 3.6 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Forests
forests
2.9 4.5 2010 16.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Plants
plants
4.5 5.4 2012 15.3 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Stresses
stresses
- - 2021 17.1 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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21 pages, 10108 KiB  
Article
Change Trend and Attribution Analysis of Reference Evapotranspiration under Climate Change in the Northern China
by Daxin Guo, Jørgen Eivind Olesen, Kiril Manevski, Johannes W. M. Pullens, Aoxiang Li and Enke Liu
Agronomy 2023, 13(12), 3036; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13123036 - 11 Dec 2023
Viewed by 724
Abstract
Reference evapotranspiration (ET0), an essential variable used to estimate crop evapotranspiration, is expected to change significantly under climate change. Detecting and attributing the change trend in ET0 to underlying drivers is therefore important to the adoption of agricultural water management [...] Read more.
Reference evapotranspiration (ET0), an essential variable used to estimate crop evapotranspiration, is expected to change significantly under climate change. Detecting and attributing the change trend in ET0 to underlying drivers is therefore important to the adoption of agricultural water management under climate change. In this study, we focus on a typical agricultural region of the Fenwei Plain in northern China and use the Mann–Kendall test and contribution rate to detect the change and trend in ET0 at annual and seasonal scales and determine the major contribution factors to ET0 change for the baseline period (1985–2015) and the future period (2030–2060) based on high-resolution gridded data and climatic data from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). The results indicate that the annual ET0 of the Fenwei Plain showed a significant decreasing trend in the baseline period but insignificant and significant increasing trends in the future period under the SSP245 and SSP585 scenarios, respectively. The annual ET0 of the plain under the SSP245 and SSP585 scenarios increase by 4.6% and 3.0%, respectively, compared to the baseline period. The change and trend in ET0 between the four seasons are different in the baseline and future periods. Winter and autumn show clear increases in ET0. VPD is the major contribution factor to the ET0 change in the plain. The change in ET0 is mainly driven by the climatic variables that change the most rather than by the climatic variables that are the most sensitive to the ET0 change. The change and trend in ET0 in the plain showed clear spatial differences, especially between the eastern and western area of the plain. To adapt to the impact of climate change on ET0, the irrigation schedule of the crops cultivated in the plain, the cropping system and management of the irrigation district in the plain need to be adjusted according to the change characteristics of spatial and temporal ET0 in the future. These results contribute to understanding the impacts of climate change on evapotranspiration in the study region and provide spatial and temporal references for adaptation in managing agricultural water use and crop cultivation under climate change. Full article
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13 pages, 1516 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Climate Change on California Rangelands and Livestock Management
by Steven M. Ostoja, Hyeyeong Choe, James H. Thorne, Pelayo Alvarez, Amber Kerr, Jennifer Balachowski and Julian Reyes
Agriculture 2023, 13(11), 2095; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13112095 - 04 Nov 2023
Viewed by 828
Abstract
On a global scale, rangelands occupy approximately half of the world’s land base surface; have a critical role in carbon sequestration and biodiversity; and support a diverse and critical economy, but at the same time, are under threat by many factors, including climate [...] Read more.
On a global scale, rangelands occupy approximately half of the world’s land base surface; have a critical role in carbon sequestration and biodiversity; and support a diverse and critical economy, but at the same time, are under threat by many factors, including climate change. California rangelands, which are no exception to these aforementioned characteristics, are also unique socio-ecological systems that provide a broad range of ecosystem services and support a >$3 billion annual cattle ranching industry. However, climate change both directly and indirectly poses significant challenges to the future sustainability of California rangelands and, ultimately, the management of livestock, which has important economic implications for the state’s agricultural economy. In this study, we examined the changes in overall climate exposure and climatic water deficit (CWD), which was used as a physiological plant water stress gauge, to evaluate potential impacts of climate change on various rangeland vegetation types across California. We used two downscaled global climate models, MIROC and CNRM, under the ‘business-as-usual’ emissions scenario of RCP8.5 at a mid-century time horizon of 2040–2069 and known vegetation–climate relationships. Using the models, we predicted climate change effects using metrics and spatial scales that have management relevance and that can support climate-informed decision making for livestock managers. We found that more than 80% of the area of the rangeland vegetation types considered in this study will have higher CWD by 2040–2069. We evaluated these results with beef cattle inventory data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture by county and found that, on average, 71.6% of rangelands in the top 30 counties were projected to be highly climate-stressed. We found that current proactive and reactive ranching practices such as resting pastures, reducing herd size, and rotational grazing may need to be expanded to include additional strategies for coping with declining plant productivity. Full article
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18 pages, 2208 KiB  
Article
How Weather and Fertilization Affected Grain Yield and Stability of Winter Wheat in a Long-Term Trial in the South Moravian Region, Czech Republic
by Lukáš Hlisnikovský, Ladislav Menšík, Przemysław Barłóg and Eva Kunzová
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2293; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092293 - 30 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 992
Abstract
We evaluated the impact of weather and fertilization treatments (Control, PK, NPK1, NPK2, and NPK3) on winter wheat grain yields in a long-term trial in Ivanovice, Czech Republic, established in 1956. A total of 15 seasons were evaluated. The mean, maximal, and minimal [...] Read more.
We evaluated the impact of weather and fertilization treatments (Control, PK, NPK1, NPK2, and NPK3) on winter wheat grain yields in a long-term trial in Ivanovice, Czech Republic, established in 1956. A total of 15 seasons were evaluated. The mean, maximal, and minimal temperatures in Ivanovice have been significantly increasing since 1961, with annual increases of 0.04 °C, 0.03 °C, and 0.05 °C, respectively. Precipitation has been decreasing annually by −0.54 mm (trend is insignificant). Four significant correlations between weather and grain yield were recorded. There were positive correlations between mean (r = 0.7) and minimal (r = 0.5) temperatures in November and negative correlations between mean temperatures in May (r = −0.6) and June (r = −0.6). The combination of naturally fertile chernozem soil and a beneficial preceding crop (alfalfa) enables sustainable cultivation of wheat, even without mineral fertilizers. The application of mineral nitrogen (N) significantly increases wheat grain yield and yield stability. Without mineral N or with high doses of mineral N, yield stability decreases. According to two response models (quadratic and quadratic-plateau), a reasonable dose of fertilizer is 107 kg ha−1 N for modern wheat varieties, corresponding to a yield of 8.1 t ha−1. Full article
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