Challenges and Opportunities Faced by Economic Development under COVID-19 Pandemic

A special issue of World (ISSN 2673-4060).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 10456

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of International Business, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung City 807618, Taiwan
Interests: international economics; industrail organization; agriculture economics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of International Business, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung City 807618, Taiwan
Interests: international economics; industrail organization; applied microeconomics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Marketing and Logistics Management, Yu Da University of Science and Technology, Miaoli County 361027, Taiwan
Interests: international economics; industrail organization; marketing strategy

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of International Business, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan City 710301, Taiwan
Interests: international marketing; leisrue marketing; trade show; internet marketing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue entitled “Challenges and Opportunities Faced by Economic Development under COVID-19 Pandemic” that will be published in World, which is a multidisciplinary and open access journal devoted to past, present, and future links between economic, political, social, and/or environmental issues. More information about the journal can be found at https://www.mdpi.com/journal/world.

The spread of the COVID-19 virus is a global health emergency involving the health authorities of all countries in an attempt to fight this new pandemic.

The pandemic has caused panic among people, and many governments have proposed control and preventive interventions such as closing cities and airports. Different intervention measures also have different degrees of impact on the economy and society. Countries such as those in Europe and the United States have adopted an epidemic prevention strategy of coexisting with the virus; Asian countries have adopted stricter control measures against the epidemic, such as China's zero-tolerance policy towards the virus.

Mutations of the virus are ongoing, and the impact of infection is still growing, despite the success of vaccine development. Furthermore, from a social and economic point of view, the impact is enormous.

Strict epidemic prevention and control can help reduce the risk of infection, but interpersonal isolation and economic closure have severely impacted social and economic activities. However, governments’ relief packages support people through economic difficulties, and policies to boost consumption have stimulated and driven economic recovery. The application of digital tools has become an alternative mode of operation for education, business, and social activities.

This Special Issue aims to publish evidence and observations in the field, covering, but not limited to, the following: economics; management; business; education; leisure; tourism; hospitality; humanities; society; public health; resource allocation; epidemic prevention policy; preventive measures; supply chain; logistics; risk; communication; case studies.

We welcome the submission of notes, reviews, original research articles, short communications, systematic reviews, and case studies targeting any of these core research questions, as the main goal of this Special Issue is to explore and address the core research issues in social science caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prof. Dr. Jen-Yao Lee
Dr. Chien-Shu Tsai
Dr. Chu-Chuan Hsu
Dr. Wen-Ke Liang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. World is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-Cov-2
  • Delta
  • Omicron
  • pandemic
  • epidemic
  • epidemic prevention
  • preventive measures
  • resilience
  • case management
  • relief
  • boost

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 3658 KiB  
Article
Access to the European Labor Market for Immigrant Women in the Wake of the COVID Pandemic
by Fatemeh Hamedanian
World 2022, 3(4), 957-978; https://doi.org/10.3390/world3040054 - 28 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3492
Abstract
Economic crises and instability during the COVID pandemic have led to a significant additional workload and uncertainty for women. The COVID virus has spread extremely rapidly, and mobility and migration are severely limited, at least in the short term. The virus has a [...] Read more.
Economic crises and instability during the COVID pandemic have led to a significant additional workload and uncertainty for women. The COVID virus has spread extremely rapidly, and mobility and migration are severely limited, at least in the short term. The virus has a significant impact on the health of people from those considered to be migrants and refugees and their access to the labor market. According to Eurostat, 1.4 million people who previously resided in an EU Member State migrated to another Member State, and almost half of this population are women. Migrating women are particularly exposed to a number of specific consequences of the pandemic. Migrant women are disproportionately the first to be laid off and the last to be rehired. This is due to gender discrimination and precarious working conditions, such as low wages, the greater burden of care work, and alternative employment costs, especially given the gender wage gap and the difficulty of accessing the formal economy. This study examines the challenges many migrant women experienced in accessing the Eurozone labor market during the COVID pandemic. Based on this primary objective, the theoretical perspective of this research relies on the segmented labor market theory. Within the framework of documentary research, this work has chosen the path of descriptive analysis to achieve the study’s objectives. The findings presented in an intersectional framework suggest that the impact on migrant women workers during the COVID pandemic is exacerbated by a segmented labor market rooted in a capitalist context and by gendered structures of racism in the European labor market. In a capitalist context, migrant women would be over-represented in the informal economy due to segmented labor market policies and the effects of gendered racism. As a result, they would be at the forefront of redundancies during the pandemic because of their difficulty accessing the European labor market. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1439 KiB  
Article
Territorial Impact and Responses to COVID-19 in South Africa: Case Studies of eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality and KwaDukuza Local Municipality
by Isaac Khambule
World 2022, 3(3), 513-529; https://doi.org/10.3390/world3030028 - 01 Aug 2022
Viewed by 3724
Abstract
Governments played an essential role in mitigating the social, political, health and economic impact and outcomes of COVID-19. Most literature limits the role of the state at the national level by focusing on the pandemic’s impact on economic growth, unemployment, poverty and state [...] Read more.
Governments played an essential role in mitigating the social, political, health and economic impact and outcomes of COVID-19. Most literature limits the role of the state at the national level by focusing on the pandemic’s impact on economic growth, unemployment, poverty and state responses. This approach neglects the role played by subnational governments in managing the pandemic. In response to this predicament, this article explores the territorial socio-economic impact of COVID-19 and the responses adopted by subnational governments through the case studies of eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality and KwaDukuza Local Municipality in South Africa. A territorial understanding of the pandemic and responses is important because of the spatial dimensions of the pandemic. Methodologically, the article utilises data from a survey conducted with informal workers in the two municipalities. The article shows the diverging impact and responses from the two municipalities, and how pre-existing socio-economic structures reinforced prevailing challenges. The article argues that a territorial understanding of the pandemic allows governments to adopt targeted interventions to enhance the effectiveness of responses to the different spatial dimensions of the pandemic. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1046 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Influence of Criteria Revitalization Strategy Implementation for the Hospitality Industry in the Post-Pandemic Era
by Tien-Chin Wang, Hsiu-Chin Hsieh, Xuan-Huynh Nguyen, Chin-Ying Huang and Jen-Yao Lee
World 2022, 3(2), 219-236; https://doi.org/10.3390/world3020012 - 02 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1988
Abstract
This study applies consistent fuzzy preference relations (CFPR) to evaluate the influential criteria of revitalization strategies (RS) for the hospitality industry in the post-pandemic (COVID-19) era in Taiwan. A real case applies CFPR in order to analyze the relationship between governmental implementation and [...] Read more.
This study applies consistent fuzzy preference relations (CFPR) to evaluate the influential criteria of revitalization strategies (RS) for the hospitality industry in the post-pandemic (COVID-19) era in Taiwan. A real case applies CFPR in order to analyze the relationship between governmental implementation and industrial expectations in Taiwan. The results indicate that “market revitalization”, such as the Taiwanese government’s implementation of various stimulus vouchers and coupons to encourage market consumption and revitalize the overall economy, is considered the most essential/important criteria for RS. This study strengthens the government sector by evaluating the heterogeneity of revitalization strategies best used to formulate the actions to pilot industries as a global contribution to fight the COVID-19 pandemic within a global crisis. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop