Advanced Engineering Design of Wastewater Treatment

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (27 February 2023) | Viewed by 6016

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment (SKLUWRE), School of Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, China
Interests: wastewater treatment; membrane separation; membrane bioreactor; crystallization; biofilm process; water reuse
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China
Interests: membrane fouling; membrane-based water treatment; membrane fabrication; drinking water treatment; water reuse; decentralized water treatment; iron and manganese removal; heavy metals removal
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water pollution control is one of the toughest challenges for humans. In addressing this problem, wastewater treatment plays a pivotal role. Recently, researchers have focused on different types of engineering of wastewater treatment with minimal cost and maximum efficiency. This Special Issue welcomes contributions on novel engineering designs that effectively treat wastewater, potentially including materials, technologies, processes, data analytics, etc. This topic in the field of wastewater treatment involves physical, chemical, and biological methods with an emphasis on engineering design, such as aerobic, anaerobic, electrochemical, membrane-based, and physical-chemical designs. Advanced designs for wastewater treatment with cleaner water, lower cost, fewer carbon emissions, and/or easier maintenance will be collected and shared.

This Special Issue welcomes original research papers, reviews, and tutorials on all aspects of the relationship between engineering and wastewater. Innovative advancements that upgrade lab-based discovery to field-based applications will be of particular interest. Papers containing engineering principles that are integrated with knowledge from other disciplines are also welcome. Environmental materials and technologies for monitoring, sensing, assessing environmental contaminants, and cleaner sustainable processes are encouraged.

Dr. Jinlong Wang
Dr. Xiaobin Tang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • engineering
  • technologies
  • wastewater
  • energy
  • water quality
  • emerging contaminants

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 5143 KiB  
Article
An Innovative Waterwheel-Rotating Biological Contactor (WRBC) System for Rural Sewage Treatment
by Jiansheng Huang, Xin Wen, Qian Tang, Deshao Liu and Shuangkou Chen
Water 2023, 15(7), 1323; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15071323 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1531
Abstract
The treatment of rural sewage has become an important part of environmental protection. In this study, a novel waterwheel-rotating biological contactor (WRBC) system, with intensified biofilm and high-shock load resistance, was applied to treat rural sewage. When the COD concentration of actual sewage [...] Read more.
The treatment of rural sewage has become an important part of environmental protection. In this study, a novel waterwheel-rotating biological contactor (WRBC) system, with intensified biofilm and high-shock load resistance, was applied to treat rural sewage. When the COD concentration of actual sewage fluctuated between 79–530 mg/L, the COD removal efficiency was 41.3–94.5%, and the NH4+-N removal efficiency always reach 100% with actual sewage. The TN removal efficiency changed between 14.3–86.2%, which was greatly affected by the water intake. The effluent TN concentration ranged from 5 to 14 mg/L, which meets the emission requirements. It maintained an absolute effluent stability when the change rates of influent loads (N or COD) varied from −60% to 100%. The biofilm morphology and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances were evaluated based on SEM and FTIR spectra. The results showed that the -NH2 group content increased compared with the inoculated sludge, and the biofilm formed more uneven compact clusters after the treatment of actual sewage. Based on 16SrRNA high-throughput sequencing techniques, the bacterial diversity and microbial community structure of the WRBC system over time was revealed. This study may help guide optimization strategies for more effective pollutant removal in rural areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Engineering Design of Wastewater Treatment)
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13 pages, 1013 KiB  
Article
Application of Response Surface Methodology on Brewery Wastewater Treatment Using Chitosan as a Coagulant
by Siphesihle Mangena Khumalo, Babatunde Femi Bakare, Emmanuel Kweinor Tetteh and Sudesh Rathilal
Water 2023, 15(6), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15061176 - 18 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1664
Abstract
Brewery wastewater (BWW) treatment seems to be challenging for conventional wastewater treatment processes. Hence, different processes (i.e., biological, physical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes) have been investigated; however, reports on parametric optimization using statistical tools are scant. In this present study, the potential [...] Read more.
Brewery wastewater (BWW) treatment seems to be challenging for conventional wastewater treatment processes. Hence, different processes (i.e., biological, physical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes) have been investigated; however, reports on parametric optimization using statistical tools are scant. In this present study, the potential application of chitosan as a biopolymer coagulant in decontaminating BWW was investigated. Operating conditions were optimised using the central composite design in response surface methodology (RSM) with 16 experimental runs. The effect of process variables, i.e., pH (4–8), chitosan dose (2–4) g/L and contact time (15–45 min) on the removal of turbidity, total organic carbon (TOC), and orthophosphates were investigated. Experimental results obtained were statistically analysed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and second-order polynomial response predictive models as functions of input variables with a significant regression coefficient of R2 > 0.95 at 95% confidence were obtained. At numerical optimum conditions of pH (8), chitosan dose (2 g/L), and contact time (43 min), validation experimental responses of 91% turbidity, 89% TOC, and 65% orthophosphate removals were obtained at a standard deviation of ±0.588, ±0.395, and ±3.603, respectively. The validation results at optimum conditions suggest that proper adjustment of pH, chitosan dose, and contact time is imperative for maximising the efficiency of chitosan in treating BWW. Moreover, the findings of the current study demonstrate that chitosan can be used as a viable bio-coagulant in BWW treatment prior to being discharged into water receiving bodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Engineering Design of Wastewater Treatment)
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12 pages, 1380 KiB  
Article
Treatment and Effective Removal of Metal Fine Particles from Waste Cutting Fluids by Flotation via Microbubbles and Skimming
by Kimio Fukami, Namiko Ogata, Kenji Yamamoto, Kazuki Kawamura, Iwao Mitani and Masaoki Sakamoto
Water 2022, 14(16), 2575; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14162575 - 20 Aug 2022
Viewed by 2332
Abstract
Cutting fluids (CFs) are chemical liquids or aqueous emulsions of mineral (or synthetic) oil widely used in metal-machining processes. They contain toxic organic compounds and petroleum products, and spent CFs contain numerous small metal particles derived from the processing of metal workpieces. The [...] Read more.
Cutting fluids (CFs) are chemical liquids or aqueous emulsions of mineral (or synthetic) oil widely used in metal-machining processes. They contain toxic organic compounds and petroleum products, and spent CFs contain numerous small metal particles derived from the processing of metal workpieces. The iron fine particles (IFPs) in CFs can diminish the quality and precision of machine products. Machining industries purchase large amounts of CFs, which they must treat appropriately and from which they must remove the IFPs; therefore, cost-effective ways to treat spent CFs are needed. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of collecting and separating the IFPs and treating organic matter in spent CFs using microbubbles (MiBs). We found that numerous IFPs with sizes of ~1 μm were suspended in spent CFs and that they could be very effectively removed by bubbling with MiBs and skimming the surface of the CFs. The lifetime of the CFs could be doubled via this treatment. The cost for treating spent CFs using MiBs was 12% lower than the cost of traditional treatment. These results strongly suggest that bubbling with MiBs is a cost-effective and eco-friendly way to treat spent CFs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Engineering Design of Wastewater Treatment)
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