Design and Management of Agricultural Drainage Systems

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2024 | Viewed by 2726

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot, China
Interests: water-saving irrigation; salinization control; efficient use of water and fertilizer; irrigation and drainage; water and soil resource regulation

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Guest Editor
High Efficiency Water-Saving Technology and Equipment and Soil and Water Environment Effect, Engineering Research Center of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Hohhot 010018, China College of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, China
Interests: irrigation district;irrigation strategy;irrigation decision-making; transport of water, fertilizer, and salt; coordinated control of irrigation and drainage
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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, China
Interests: water pollution; environmental pollution and control
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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Sciences and Technologies, Polytechnic of Coimbra, College of Agriculture, 3045-601 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: hydrology; soil water management; fertigation management
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agricultural adaptation to global changes, with a particular focus on soil conservation and water scarcity, involves new technical and managerial solutions to be applied to production systems and related ecosystems. Examples of such adaptations include the improvement of drainage designs to prevent soil salinization hazards, agronomic practices related to crop and soil management, water supply and on-farm irrigation management for water conservation, and soil care. This issue is emergent due to the higher demand for food production and the adverse impacts of climate change, involving higher soil salinization risks, less water available for agriculture, and all of the dependent ecosystem services, particularly in drier areas.

The forthcoming Special Issue will focus on the recent advancements in the conceptualization and management of agricultural drainage systems. This entails addressing the multifaceted issues surrounding farmland water and soil conservancy engineering processes, as well as the optimization of the efficient use of agricultural water, fertilizers, and energy inputs. These advances will contribute to elucidating some current questions and point out feasible solutions for specific real problems, particularly in water scarcity contexts.

Submissions on the following topics are encouraged: (1) Optimization of agricultural drainage designs. (2) Crop management under soil salinization conditions, referring to the selection of crop patterns, irrigation techniques, and drainage management. (3) Application of information technologies to achieve the intelligent management of agricultural drainage systems, aiming for optimal performance. (4) Improvement of the quality of agroecosystems based on best drainage practices. (5) Soil and drainage management, including the reuse of drainage water for irrigation, and salinization as well as health risk control

Prof. Dr. Haibin Shi
Dr. Qingfeng Miao
Dr. Weiying Feng
Dr. José Manuel Monteiro Gonçalves
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agricultural drainage
  • salinized soil
  • water and salt transport
  • model application
  • water-saving irrigation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 4528 KiB  
Article
Effects of Subsurface Drainage Spacing and Organic Fertilizer Application on Alfalfa Yield, Quality, and Coastal Saline Soil
by Shengwang Zhang, Jianwen Wang, Qian Yang, Erzi Zhang, Hiba Shaghaleh, Yousef AlhajHamoud and Qiu Jin
Water 2024, 16(8), 1144; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081144 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1394
Abstract
Subsurface drainage and organic fertilizer application are two important measures for improving saline–alkali soils, while the effects of different drainage spacings combined with organic fertilizer application amounts on alfalfa growth and coastal saline soil properties have seldom been evaluated. This study designed subsurface [...] Read more.
Subsurface drainage and organic fertilizer application are two important measures for improving saline–alkali soils, while the effects of different drainage spacings combined with organic fertilizer application amounts on alfalfa growth and coastal saline soil properties have seldom been evaluated. This study designed subsurface drainage pipes at four spacing distances, including 0 m (CK, without subsurface drainage), 6 m (S1), 12 m (S2), and 18 m (S3), and three organic fertilizer application amounts, including 3000 kg/ha (N1), 4500 kg/ha (N2), and 6000 kg/ha (N3), to observe the effects of different combinations of subsurface pipe spacings and organic fertilization amounts on alfalfa yield, quality, soil salinity, and nutrients. The results showed that the yield of alfalfa increased with higher fertilization amounts and smaller spacing between drainage pipes. The highest yield occurred in the S1N3 treatment, and the three batches reached 1268.5 kg/ha, 3168.0 kg/ha, and 2613.3 kg/ha, respectively, significantly (p < 0.05) higher than CK for all three batches. The increase in organic fertilizer amount resulted in an increase of 0.5–9.3% in the crude protein content, a decrease of 1.8–3.4% in the neutral detergent fiber content, and a decrease of 1.3–5.5% in the acid detergent fiber content for alfalfa plants. Under CK, the contents of quality indicators in alfalfa were the highest. For the drainage treatments, the quality indicator contents were overall at a higher level under S3. Subsurface drainage had a reduction effect on the salinity of all the 0–80 cm soils. For the surface soil, it was detected that smaller spacing was beneficial for reducing soil salt content, while higher fertilization amounts increased the salt content. S1 reduced the soil salt content by 36.3–46.1% compared to CK; however, N3 increased the salt content by 7.0–16.2% compared to the other two fertilization treatments. In addition, smaller spacing between the subsurface drainage pipes generally reduced the soil’s available nitrogen, and total nitrogen increased the C/N ratio but had no significant effect on the organic matter. It was concluded that the spacing between subsurface drainage pipes and the application amounts of organic fertilizer have remarkable impacts on alfalfa yield and quality, mainly by changing the soil salinity and nutrient status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Management of Agricultural Drainage Systems)
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17 pages, 6599 KiB  
Article
Water and Salinity Variation along the Soil Profile and Groundwater Dynamics of a Fallow Cropland System in the Hetao Irrigation District, China
by Cong Hou, Qingfeng Miao, Haibin Shi, Zhiyuan Hu, Yi Zhao, Cuicui Yu, Yan Yan and Weiying Feng
Water 2023, 15(23), 4098; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15234098 - 26 Nov 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 969
Abstract
Managing soil salinity has always been a difficult problem for agriculture. Balancing water and salt while maintaining crop quality and yield is a key issue for agricultural sustainability. The Hetao lrrigation District in China has a complex mix of cultivated and uncultivated land [...] Read more.
Managing soil salinity has always been a difficult problem for agriculture. Balancing water and salt while maintaining crop quality and yield is a key issue for agricultural sustainability. The Hetao lrrigation District in China has a complex mix of cultivated and uncultivated land which plays a crucial role in soil salinization processes. To investigate the dynamic properties of soil moisture and salinity, soil ions and groundwater, cultivated and fallow soils in the Hetao lrrigation District were analyzed, side by side, using a combination of field and laboratory tests, with data processed using univariate and multivariate statistical approaches. The results showed that soil moisture increased with increasing soil depth in both cultivated and fallow soils. Salinity showed an increasing trend in 2022 and 2023 from April to September. The soil ions were mainly sulfate in the cultivated soils and chloride in the fallow soils. The characteristic factors affecting salt accumulation in cultivated soils are Na++K+, Cl, SSC, SO42−, HCO3, and pH, and the characteristic factors affecting salt accumulation in fallow soils are Na++K+, Cl, SSC, HCO3, and pH. Water table depth varied with irrigation and precipitation and was strongly influenced by external environmental factors. Groundwater salinity remained stable throughout the study period. This study provides a theoretical basis for the prevention and control of soil salinization in arid and semiarid areas through the “dry drainage salt” measure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Management of Agricultural Drainage Systems)
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