Study of the Soil Water Movement in Irrigated Agriculture III

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1956

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: soil physics; flow and transport in soils; dielectric sensors; salinity; irrigation and drainage
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Guest Editor
Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: soil physics; agricultural meteorology; irrigation and drainage; salt transport in soils
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Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Natural Resources Development and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos Street, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: soil physics; plant soil–water interaction; flow and transport in soils; horticultural substrates; vadose zone hydrology; water resource management
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In irrigated agriculture, the study of the various ways water infiltrates soils is necessary. In this respect, soil hydraulic properties, such as moisture retention curve (SMRC), diffusivity, and hydraulic conductivity functions, play a crucial role, as they control the infiltration process and the soil water and solute movement.

The modeling and flow simulation of soil water movement depend on the appropriate description of the hydraulic properties and their measurements (in situ and in the laboratory). A comprehensive review of recent developments made in the various aspects of soil water movement in irrigated agriculture is welcome.

The above may be presented in a number of research topics that tackle one or more of the following challenges:

  • Irrigation systems and one-, two-, and three-dimensional soil water movement;
  • One- and three-dimensional infiltration analysis from tension and mini disc infiltrometers;
  • Dielectric devices for monitoring soil water content and methods for the assessment of soil water pressure head;
  • Soil hydraulic properties and their temporal and spatial variability under irrigation situations;
  • Saturated–unsaturated flow model in irrigated soils;
  • Soil water redistribution and the role of hysteresis;
  • Soil water movement and drainage in irrigated agriculture;
  • Salt accumulation, soil salinization, and soil salinity assessment;
  • Methods of soil salinity determination;
  • Effect of salts on hydraulic conductivity;
  • Soil conditioners and mulches which change the upper soil hydraulic properties and their effect on soil water movement.

Prof. Dr. George Kargas
Prof. Dr. Petros Kerkides
Dr. Paraskevi Londra
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • infiltration process
  • hydraulic properties
  • water and salt transport in irrigated soils
  • modeling water flow
  • disc infiltrometer
  • dielectric sensors
  • soil salinity

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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14 pages, 644 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Methods Predicting Advance Time in Furrow Irrigation
by George Kargas, Dimitrios Koka, Paraskevi A. Londra and Leonidas Mindrinos
Water 2024, 16(8), 1105; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081105 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 595
Abstract
In the design of furrow irrigation, and in general in surface irrigation, the reliable estimation of the advance time at the furrow end (tL) is a key issue for improving the efficiency and uniformity of irrigation. In this study, three methods [...] Read more.
In the design of furrow irrigation, and in general in surface irrigation, the reliable estimation of the advance time at the furrow end (tL) is a key issue for improving the efficiency and uniformity of irrigation. In this study, three methods are used for estimating the tL, and their results are compared with the experimental data of fifteen different furrows from the international literature. These methods are as follows: (a) the Valiantzas equation, (b) the method presented by Walker and Skogerboe, based on solving the volume balance equation by the Newton–Raphson iterative procedure and (c) the method of Philip and Farrell. The first two methods assume that the infiltration is described by the Lewis–Kostiakov equation and the extended Lewis–Kostiakov equation, respectively, while in the case of the Philip and Farrell method, the infiltration is described by the Philip equation and the Lewis-Kostiakov equation. The results showed that in most cases of the first two methods, the absolute relative error value of the predicted time tL was less than 10%. The Philip and Farrell method using the Lewis–Kostiakov infiltration equation underestimates the time tL and fails especially in the case where the volume of the surface water is not negligible compared to the total volume of water entering the system. The Valiantzas method is recommended because it was simpler and easier to use and showed greater prediction accuracy of tL, resulting in better planning of irrigation systems and contributing to water saving, which is currently a big issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of the Soil Water Movement in Irrigated Agriculture III)
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15 pages, 2888 KiB  
Article
Effects of Freeze–Thaw Cycles on Soil Nitrogen Transformation in Improved Saline Soils from an Irrigated Area in Northeast China
by Siyu Nie, Xian Jia, Yuanchun Zou and Jianmin Bian
Water 2024, 16(5), 653; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16050653 - 23 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 957
Abstract
Freeze–thaw cycles (FTCs) occur during the nongrowing season, and residual nitrogen (N) increases the risk of N loss with melting water. To study the effect of FTCs on soil N, rice fields in improved irrigated saline soil in northeast China were selected as [...] Read more.
Freeze–thaw cycles (FTCs) occur during the nongrowing season, and residual nitrogen (N) increases the risk of N loss with melting water. To study the effect of FTCs on soil N, rice fields in improved irrigated saline soil in northeast China were selected as the research subjects. Water content (10%, 20%, and 30%), different N fertilizer levels (180 and 220 kg/ha), and multiple FTCs of soil samples were used to clarify the effects of N fertilizer application and water content on N efficiency. The results indicate that, after the third FTC, the soil ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) level increased significantly. NH4+-N increased with an increase in the initial soil moisture content and decreased with fertilizer levels. Nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) decreases with increasing initial soil moisture. The inorganic N increased significantly compared with that in the unfrozen stage, indicating that FTCs promote soil N mineralization. However, high fertilization rates inhibit mineralization. Analysis of variance showed that NO3-N is sensitive to the N application rate, water content, and salinity (p < 0.05). FTCs and artificial fertilization are the factors that affect N mineralization (p < 0.05). The research results are significant for preventing nitrate leaching and soil acidification during spring plowing and providing a scientific basis for fertilization systems and water environment pollution in improved saline soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Study of the Soil Water Movement in Irrigated Agriculture III)
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