Importance of Rivers, Lakes, and Reservoirs on Biology and Zoogeography of Fishes

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2024) | Viewed by 821

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Interests: endangered fishes; freshwater fish behavior; impact of introduced fishes; systematics and zoogeography of freshwater fishes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue on Importance of Rivers, Lakes, and Reservoirs on Biology and Zoogeography of Fishes provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge and research advancements in understanding the ecological, biological, and zoogeographical, dynamics of fishes in these freshwater systems. This Special Issue aims to shed light on the complex interactions among fishes, their habitats, and the factors influencing their distribution and abundance.

Rivers and reservoirs are very important ecosystems for fish habitats and avenues for dispersal; thus, the characteristics of these ecosystems, such as water flow dynamics, temperature gradients, and substrate composition shape the interactions and community structure of populations of fishes. This Special Issue also covers the effects of hydrological variability, such as floods and droughts, on fish migration patterns, reproduction, dispersal, and survival. Additionally, the issue explores the role of habitat complexity, including the availability of suitable spawning grounds, refugia, and food resources, in shaping community composition and diversity. Human activities, e.g.,  dam construction and channelization, may impact behavior, migration routes, and reportuctive success are may have  negative impact on fish behavior, migration rounts and reproductive success. Furthermore, the issue explores the consequences of pollution, overfishing, and invasive species on fishes, emphasizing the need for effective management strategies to mitigate these threats.

Studies on the novel research approaches and methodologies, showcasing advancements in ecological studies, the use of innovative technologies such as benthic electric trawls, remote sensing, acoustic telemetry, and genetic analyses to better understand movement patterns, habitat preferences, and population connectivity within and among networks of rivers, lakes, and reservoirs (but not limited) are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Jay Stauffer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drainage history
  • fish systematics
  • zoogeography
  • invasive species
  • connectivity

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

21 pages, 4063 KiB  
Article
Prey Supply and Predation as Potential Limitations to Feasibility of Anadromous Salmonid Introductions in a Reservoir
by Rachelle C. Johnson, Benjamin L. Jensen, Tessa J. Code, Jeffrey J. Duda and David A. Beauchamp
Water 2024, 16(8), 1157; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16081157 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 608
Abstract
Introducing anadromous fish upstream of migration barriers has frequently been proposed as a conservation strategy, but existing conditions and future changes to the ecosystems above barriers such as invasive species, climate change, and varying water operations influence the capacity to support such introductions. [...] Read more.
Introducing anadromous fish upstream of migration barriers has frequently been proposed as a conservation strategy, but existing conditions and future changes to the ecosystems above barriers such as invasive species, climate change, and varying water operations influence the capacity to support such introductions. In the Upper Skagit River, Washington, USA, introduction of anadromous salmonids above three high-head dams was proposed; however, the proliferation of invasive redside shiner Richardsonius balteatus fundamentally altered reservoir food web interactions, presenting potential challenges for the growth and production of introduced anadromous salmonids. By combining empirical measurements of zooplankton availability and temporal patterns in thermal structure of the reservoir with bioenergetics model simulations to quantify the rearing capacity of Ross Lake, we estimated the lake could support millions of sockeye salmon fry entering in spring after accounting for temporal consumption demand by the existing planktivore community dominated by redside shiner. The initial fry estimates varied according to the expected fry-to-smolt survival rate, and whether salmonids would be thermally restricted from prey in the epilimnion. This translated to estimates of 189,000 to 285,000 smolts leaving the following spring, and 7700 to 11,700 returning adults, using mean fry-to-smolt and smolt-to-adult survival rates from a nearby sockeye salmon population. We also estimated that predation potential could pose substantial mortality for lake-rearing sockeye or Chinook salmon, although it is expected to play a lesser role in limiting survival of species that only migrate through the reservoir. These results provide a case study and framework for examining bottom-up and top-down food web processes that influence growth and survival of introduced anadromous salmonids in reservoir habitats, thus guiding the direction of future feasibility studies in Ross Lake and other regulated rivers where introduction programs are considered. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop