Sustainable Agriculture: Soil and Water Conservation

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2024 | Viewed by 4750

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Machines, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CZU), Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Praha 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic
Interests: soil science; erosion problems; tillage systems; soil fertility
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Guest Editor
ÚAPMV AF, Zemědělská 1, Building C, 61300 Brno, Czech Republic
Interests: soil

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agriculture is currently experiencing a whole series of changes. The global population has reached eight billion, and the sustainability of this situation must be addressed. The pressure on agriculture to ensure food sufficiency continues to rise. Related to this are new trends and technologies that need to be designed and verified. These factors undoubtedly include soil and water conservation. Soil and water conservation is the primary key to solving these questions. This Special Issue aims to describe experiences with the development and application of new methods for ensuring soil fertility, especially concerning soil and water protection while producing enough food for the entire world. We expect contributions from all continents, and we hope that through the mutual exchange of experiences, we will advance our field further to the benefit of all.

Prof. Dr. Petr Novák
Dr. Oldřich Látal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • agriculture
  • sustainable agricultural practices
  • soil conservation
  • water conservation
  • soil fertility

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 8217 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Analysis of Regional Vegetation Correlation with Climate and Phenology in the Midsection of Maowusu Sandland
by Zekun Li, Bing Xu, Delong Tian, Jun Wang and Hexiang Zheng
Water 2024, 16(5), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16050623 - 20 Feb 2024
Viewed by 858
Abstract
It is essential to monitor the dynamics of vegetation at different scales in space and time to promote the sustainable development of terrestrial ecosystems. We used the Google Earth Engine (GEE) cloud platform to perform a comprehensive analysis of the changes in normalized [...] Read more.
It is essential to monitor the dynamics of vegetation at different scales in space and time to promote the sustainable development of terrestrial ecosystems. We used the Google Earth Engine (GEE) cloud platform to perform a comprehensive analysis of the changes in normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) Mann-Kendall (MK) + Sen trend in the hinterland region of the Maowusu sandland in China over the last two decades. We performed bias-correlation studies using soil and climate data. Furthermore, we performed a partial Mantel test to analyze the spatial and temporal fluctuations of vegetation health-related indices. Additionally, we developed a logistic dual model of the phenology index using the Lenvenberg–Marquardt technique. The objective was to uncover the factors contributing to the regional shifts in vegetation dynamics. We provide a comprehensive analytic method designed to monitor vegetation over some time and forecast its future recovery. The findings indicate that over the past 20 years, more than 90% of the regional NDVI in the study area has exhibited a consistent and significant upward trend. This trend is primarily influenced by the adverse impact of temperature and the beneficial impact of precipitation. Additionally, long-term phenological indicators in the study area reveal that the vegetation’s growth cycle commences on the 125th day of the year and concludes on the 267th day of the year. This suggests that the shorter duration of the vegetation’s growth season may be attributed to the local climate and unfavorable groundwater depth conditions. levated temperatures throughout the next spring and autumn seasons would significantly affect the wellbeing of plants, with soil moisture being a crucial determinant of plant development in the examined region. This study presents a wide range of analytical tools for monitoring vegetation over a long period and predicting its future recovery. It considers factors such as vegetation health, phenology, and climatic influences. The study establishes a solid scientific foundation for understanding the reasons behind regional vegetation changes in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture: Soil and Water Conservation)
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16 pages, 1583 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Water Utilization on the Dynamic Total Efficiency of China’s Agricultural Production
by Ying Feng, I-Fang Lin, Ching-Cheng Lu and Hsiu-Hsiu Lin
Water 2023, 15(7), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15071266 - 23 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1406
Abstract
Water resources are very important to agricultural production. In recent years, the change rate of agricultural cultivated land area in China has been very low, so it is not easy to increase its area and improve production capacity. To measure the impact of [...] Read more.
Water resources are very important to agricultural production. In recent years, the change rate of agricultural cultivated land area in China has been very low, so it is not easy to increase its area and improve production capacity. To measure the impact of China’s water resources on agricultural efficiency from 2012 to 2016, this research applies the dynamic SBM model, conceives agricultural water as an external input, and uses the cultivated land area as an immutable intertemporal variable. The empirical results show that (1) the agricultural efficiency of Beijing, Heilongjiang, Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Shandong, Sichuan, Qinghai, and Xinjiang are not affected by agricultural water. (2) The average value of China’s overall agricultural efficiency increased from 0.834 to 0.910, indicating that agricultural water is a positive efficiency factor. (3) Jilin, Chongqing, Inner Mongolia, Shaanxi, and Hubei are the five administrative regions with the most improvement in agricultural efficiency. (4) Insufficient agricultural productivity is the main factor affecting agricultural efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture: Soil and Water Conservation)
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Review

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22 pages, 7047 KiB  
Review
A Critical Review of Innovations and Perspectives for Providing Adequate Water for Sustainable Irrigation
by Ahmed Abou-Shady, Muhammad Saboor Siddique and Wenzheng Yu
Water 2023, 15(17), 3023; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15173023 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1720
Abstract
Global climatic change intensifies the water crisis, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. In this regard, the provision of enough water for irrigation is a serious dilemma because the agricultural sector consumes the largest amount of water (70% withdrawal and 90% consumption). In [...] Read more.
Global climatic change intensifies the water crisis, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. In this regard, the provision of enough water for irrigation is a serious dilemma because the agricultural sector consumes the largest amount of water (70% withdrawal and 90% consumption). In this review, we have summarized recent innovations that have emerged as unconventional techniques to supply adequate water for irrigation purposes. We present the principles and basics of seven approaches: the Sahara Forest Project (SFP), water extraction from the air (WEA), aquifer recharge, the treatment of marginal water using a magnetic field, desalination and wastewater treatment (DWT), electro-agric technology (E-AT), and the Toshka Project. The SFP is currently being utilized in Aqaba, Jordan, and DWT is considered a common practice worldwide, whereas some of these innovations are still under investigation to ensure their feasibility for large-scale applications, such as E-AT. The Toshka Project is considered a wonderful idea that utilizes the water stored behind the High Dam in Lake Nasser, Egypt. Several approaches have been adopted to reduce the amount of water being used for irrigation, as the current amount of freshwater is insufficient for the requirements of increased agricultural consumption, particularly in hot, arid, and semi-arid regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture: Soil and Water Conservation)
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